Hooking Last Gen MBP up to Plasma Screen?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Ahheck01, Jun 24, 2007.

  1. Ahheck01 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2006
    #1
    I've got a very nice Panasonic 42" Plasma with connections out the wazoo. I'd like to connect my Macbook pro (Got it just before the last revision :( ) to it in a way that would allow me take full advantage of the Plasma's "native resolution". Is this possible? Which connectors should I use? DVI to S-video, or CMDA, or what?

    Thanks,

    -Evan
     
  2. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #2
    If you want to take advantage of the full resolution, don't use s-video or composite video. Use DVI or VGA. You may need an adapter cable for your MBP.
     
  3. taylorwilsdon macrumors 68000

    taylorwilsdon

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2006
    Location:
    Bay Area
    #3
    DVI to DVI (or HDMI) is the only way to get a native resolution except VGA (d-sub), but that isn't a digital signal so it should only be a last resort. S-video is behind VGA, its an analog connection that will only provide up to 480p, which is not even HD. I have no idea what you mean by CMDA. However, be warned that plasma screens are considered the absolute worst for computer use. If you're going to be doing anything except playing DVD's or watching TV from the Macbook Pro over the Plasma, don't bother. It looks awful.
     
  4. kolax macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    #4
    I've found plasma's are a lot nicer for displaying as computer screens. They are smoother - LCD TV's are often very sharp, where Plasma's are blended. I often use Plasma TV's at work for demonstrating things on a large screen, and I much prefer the colour output and smoothness rather than the rigidness of an LCD.

    As already said, best way to connect it is DVI to HDMI (be prepared to pay up to $80 for the cable..HDMI connectors don't come cheap).

    I'd recommend being about 5 feet away from the screen for best performance and less strain on the eyes.
     

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