How are you disabling ads in Safari 8?

Discussion in 'OS X Yosemite (10.10)' started by thadoggfather, Jun 17, 2014.

  1. thadoggfather macrumors G3

    thadoggfather

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    #1
    curious!

    Not a fan of ads.

    Also, any one else find it cheesy the new version magically re-enables pop ups and I had to switch it off again?
     
  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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  3. thadoggfather thread starter macrumors G3

    thadoggfather

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    #3
    Can you elaborate?

    adblocker noob on previous Mavs version of Safari.
     
  4. sean5900 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 29, 2012
    #4
    AdBlock is working just fine for me on Safari 8. If you did a upgrade I noticed it disabled all my extensions the first time I launched Safari, but it brought up a dialogue box and told me. If you did do a upgrade check your extensions under preferences and make sure its turned on.
     
  5. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #5
    Run dnsmasq on the machine to act as a DNS cache server. Build a custom DNS route list for sites whose ads you want to block. Have the IP address resolve as 127.0.0.1. Have pixelserv serve a single 1x1 transparent GIF that responds to every request with that pixel on port 80. The whole setup is faster than an ad block extension, better than a host file block, and gives your internet a slight boost in speed.
     
  6. thadoggfather thread starter macrumors G3

    thadoggfather

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    #6
    Thanks! Works beautifully again!
     
  7. nick19 macrumors member

    nick19

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    Jun 4, 2014
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    London, UK
  8. asvob macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2014
    #8
    This is a really good way to get rid of ads, and it isn't too hard to deploy. AdBlock extensions will also increase your browser's RAM consumption, not only overhead from the extra javascript and layout data, but each iframe can take over 4MB extra overhead, due to how the adblock extension works (injects a large stylesheet into each frame that has filters for every advertisement it knows of).

    As a test, load a page with a lot of frames such as this Vim Color test page: http://vimcolorschemetest.googlecode.com/svn/html/index-c.html and try it with and without adblock, then compare the memory consumption.

    For most, this is rarely a problem :)
     
  9. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #9
    I can't take credit for it, it was brought to my attention by a coworker. As an extra bonus, you can have dnsmasq be a DNS caching server for your entire local network. This solution also works very well on mobile devices such as iOS and Android. I have it running on my iPhone and have it setup to cache and redirect the cellular DNS traffic. Works extremely well on networks with a high ping time.
     
  10. kemo macrumors 6502a

    kemo

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2008
    Location:
    Behind ProtonVPN
    #10
    Hey, this sounds very good. I was trying to get it running but I'm still getting issue get the pixelserv running. I have been searching for any guide but I have found nothing how to install this solution on Mac. If you can describe in a few steps what's required to get it working on Mac, it would be really helpful.

    Thanks!
     
  11. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #11
    MacRumors doesn't like ad block bypass howtos, so this will be brief. Pixelserve will only work if nothing else is using TCP port 80. It must run with root permissions to be able to bind to that port. It will run without a problem with the stock perl included with Mac OS X Leopard and newer. I personally have it set to run as a LaunchDaemon as root (not really good for security, but eh).
     
  12. haravikk macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    #12
    I use GlimmerBlocker, it requires Java to run so it's maybe not quite as lean as a DNS server, but it does handle the same kind of ad-blocking rules as in-browser plugins use, but affects all browsers, (no need to install for all browsers) and you can use a single GlimmerBlocker instance on your network if you want by directing all traffic to it.

    I do agree that a proper DNS cache would be faster overall; I wonder, has anyone developed one that can be configured automatically (and periodically updated) to block known advertising domains? That seems like it would be the best solution, rather than having to manually enter a domain to block every time you see an ad you don't like.
     
  13. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Inside
    #13
    Mine setup pulls done a weekly list, properly formats it, whitelists a few things, pushes it to a few remote systems, restarts dnsmasq, and flushes the DNS cache. There's even a manual way that works by taking input in the form of an instant message. The whole thing works very well.
     

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