How are you representing white ink on T-shirts files?

Discussion in 'Design and Graphics' started by tobefirst, Nov 8, 2011.

  1. tobefirst macrumors 68040

    tobefirst

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #1
    I've done probably 50 t-shirt designs over the years, and have always represented any white ink areas with a magenta spot color and a note in the files that that is to be printed white (similar to how I would draw die lines or perf lines in a non-printing spot color and mark as die or perf).

    However, I'll be working with a new printer in the coming weeks and figured I should probably already know how it is officially done if I'm not doing it correctly already. I've never had any issue doing it this way, but I'm curious if there is a better, more accepted way of doing this.

    So, design community, how are you preparing your files when using white ink?
     
  2. UTclassof89 macrumors 6502

    UTclassof89

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    #2
    That's exactly how I do it too. Never had a problem or a printer ask for another method.
     
  3. MurrayRL macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2010
    #3
    I have been doing T-shirt designs since the Mac IIci days and that is exactly how I have always done it. As long as it is a spot colour and not a CMYK magenta all will be sweet.
     
  4. tobefirst thread starter macrumors 68040

    tobefirst

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #4
    Thanks, guys. I appreciate the confirmation of what I'm doing. If anyone else wants to chime in, the more the merrier. Thanks!
     
  5. davedee65 macrumors regular

    davedee65

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #5
    Over the years I've designed and supplied 100's t-prints to printers in the UK and overseas and have always set my artwork up with a background layer as the garment colour and then shown white as a spot white. This has always worked well for me especially when dealing with printers in China or India where any slight chance of misunderstanding needs to be removed!!

    But if your way has always worked for you then I don't see any reason to change as long as your printer is clear about how you supply the artwork.

    Cheers
    D
     
  6. Jim Campbell macrumors 6502a

    Jim Campbell

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2006
    Location:
    A World of my Own; UK
    #6
    Never done a t-shirt for external print, but I did have to do a series of polybag designs for subscription copies of a magazine and, like everyone else, just did a clearly defined single spot. Because the BG colour was transparent, I couldn't use spot white on the BG as davedee65 does.

    Cheers

    Jim
     
  7. SAdProZ macrumors 6502

    SAdProZ

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2005
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #7
    If you're using Adobe Illustrator go to View > Show Transparency Grid.

    Make sure your white is a spot color: Select any white object and go to Select > Same > Fill Color (Now everything that has a white fill will be selected). Now create a New Swatch and select "Color Type: Spot Color".

    Your printer should be good with this, but don't forget to send them a proof of the design. I usually make a mockup design of the shirt with actual background and send it to them so that the printer and I are on the same page.
     

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