How can I achieve this without post-processing? (photos included)

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by 66217, Oct 15, 2007.

  1. 66217 Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #1
    So I took this photo, but it looks strange compared to the second one, in which I used Aperture to change the contrast.

    How can I achieve this without the need of post-processing? Do I need a filter for this?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. overanalyzer macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Location:
    Boston, MA USA
    #2
    Looks like a polarizing filter might have helped cut down the glare.
     
  3. vanmacguy macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2007
    Location:
    Not where you live.
    #3
    A slightly longer shutter speed would achieve the same effect. The original photograph is a touch under exposed hence the grey instead of the black.

    Cheers.
     
  4. pdpfilms macrumors 68020

    pdpfilms

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2004
    Location:
    Vermontana
    #4
    You mean overexposed (over= too much light, under=not enough). So what you have to do is set your camera to underexpose the image... If it's an SLR, increase the shutter speed. If it's a point and shoot with adjustability, set exposure to -1 or however that system works.
     
  5. Butthead macrumors 6502

    Butthead

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    #5
    I do not believe the image is overexposed, see the histogram attached---histogram for RGB is the same.

    Somewhere in this forum is a thread on histogram interpretations, with a link to a site that shows just this kind of photo with no shadows or highlights, I'll look for it.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. baby duck monge macrumors 68000

    baby duck monge

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2003
    Location:
    Memphis, TN
    #6
    You would probably have better luck if you adjusted the levels instead of the contrast (though that's still PP). Your histogram shows us two things: 1) you have not lost information to shadow or highlight, and 2) you have nothing near a white or black point.

    While you do not want your histogram to fall of the edge, you do want to come close to the edge. If you readjusted for white and black, all the gray would go away. Not something I can really tell you how to do in-camera, but I would rather start with your histogram and fix it than risk losing too much info from the start.
     
  7. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #7
    Do you mean this one?

    I'll try adjusting the image differently to see if it improves.


    And maybe tomorrow I'll try and take at the same hour a similar photo. To see how can I make the photo look like the second one without post-processing

    I'll try adjusting the shutter speed, etc. and I would tell you how it went.

    Thanks,:)
     
  8. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #8
    What metering mode did you use?

    It is possible that you could use centre weighted metering, point the camera away from where you want to shoot (probably more at the sky in this case), meter (half-press) and then re-frame to shoot.

    Or use exposure compensation to force the camera to use the metering information differently to get the exposure you want.
     
  9. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #9
    It was center weighted. And with -0.7 exposure compensation.

    I'll try your first advice.

    As for the exposure compensation, which value should help me the most?
     
  10. M@lew macrumors 68000

    M@lew

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #10
    Shooting RAW? I think you pretty much have to post process. If you really don't want to, I'd meter the sky and reduce the exposure about a stop like other people have said.
     

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