how can I give permission 777

Discussion in 'macOS' started by iradhwan, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. iradhwan macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2009
    #1
    Hi every one

    Could any one please give me how can I give the permeation number 777 to the files?
     
  2. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
  3. iradhwan thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2009
    #3
    Thank you but I don't know how I need to give this permeation to several files,
    could you please tell me how
     
  4. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #4
    1) It's permission. Not what you are typing.

    2) You are going to need the full Unix path to the file(s). This will start with /

    3) Open the Terminal and type:

    Code:
    chmod 777 <path to file>
    
    Replace <path to file> with the full Unix path to the file you want to change. Hit return and then type the same for the second file and so on.
     
  5. iradhwan thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2009
    #5
    hmmmm I'm so stupid could you please give me more details .

    thank you again and sorry for noise you

    Note if you need to use me mac no problem for me I'll enable screen sharing
     
  6. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #6
    Right. Let's try and ignore the Unix path thing for the moment. If you can see the files in the Finder then open the Terminal, type (without the ") "chmod 777 " (the last space is important) and drag the first file from the Finder to the Terminal window. This will put the full Unix path there. Hit return and it will change the permissions (if you have access to do that: you may not). Do that for each file you want to change. I honestly can't make it any simpler than that.
     
  7. LPZ macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    #7
    Here's a simple way. Open Terminal (in Utilities) and type the following (but don't press return). Include a space after the final 7.

    Code:
    chmod 777
    Then select all the files that you want to give permission 777, drag them into the Terminal window, and drop them there. The paths to those files will be appended to the chmod command.

    Then click on the Terminal window to make it active, and press return. That should do it.

    [EDIT] I see someone else has suggested the same!
     
  8. iradhwan thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2009
    #8
    :rolleyes::rolleyes: I'm rally tired today I'll read this tomorrow carefully and talked to you thank you for help
     
  9. iradhwan thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2009
    #9
    ohhhhhhhhhhhhhh it is very good thank you thank you thank you
     
  10. PurdueGuy macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    #10
    After reading all this, be VERY careful what you are doing.
    Why do you need to be messing around in Terminal, and changing file permissions, if you don't know how any of it works?
     
  11. Hal Itosis macrumors 6502a

    Hal Itosis

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    #11
    Good question. [technically, there are a few items for which (sudo) chmod 777 would cause the OS to malfunction. (i speak of setuid executables).]

    Some folks need to learn the hard way i guess.
     
  12. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #12
    To the OP, if you're having this much trouble with trying to get chmod a file, I'd recommend you becareful. Altering permissions on the file system could have some grave affects on your system.

    Its ok to learn some new ways of doing things, we were all n00bs at one point. I suggest you get a unix book or learn through the man pages if you want to increase your knowledge on terminal commands/interacting with the shell
     

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