how determine which ram is compatible with late 2009 macbook (white)

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by weedeemer, May 18, 2015.

  1. weedeemer macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 18, 2015
    #1
    Hi everyone,
    I have Googled about ram compatibility, but found no specific answer. What really determines ram compatibility? I think it has something to do with specific memory controller on the board and some 'little' chip beside it. And what I find interesting I that - the same 'little' chip must be on the RAM module. (probably standardized chip or just 'generic' or just some numbers, code, etc..)
    So, can someone provide more information so we can make a table (geek stuff) to help others.

    And, I would appreciate information about specific MacBook model (late 2009, - 6.1) so I don't have to open it and search for a needle in the haystack:)
    Where I live, 'mac certified' ram module has double or even triple price than regular.

    Thank you!!
     
  2. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #2
    PC3-8500 DDR3 SO-DIMM 1066 MHz Type RAM

    8gb if your running snow leopard or earlier

    16gb for any o/s after
     
  3. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #3
    This, except max supported RAM on his model is 8GB (2x4GB). Won't support 16GB.
     
  4. weedeemer thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 18, 2015
    #4
    I have upgraded to Yosemite(first is was snow leopard), but, max ram is limited by memory controller and another parameters...

    Another question, is there any difference between latency numbers when we are talking about performance. (higher speed modules have higher cl... But when they run on lower speed than declared, does latency stays like declared or it can be/is changed?)
     
  5. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #5
    I'd just stick with putting the correct speeds in (1066MHz). There have been so many issues with different speeds and stuff, from just general sluggish performance to kernel panicking/won't even post. Not worth taking the risk.

    If you need some links to the correct RAM, please let us know where you're based (US/UK) and I'm sure we can get an Amazon link up for you.
     
  6. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #6
    "Apple only officially supports a maximum of 4 GB of RAM in both lines. However, site sponsor Other World Computer has discovered that the "Late 2009" (MacBook6,1) model actually is capable of supporting 8 GB of RAM. Likewise, OWC has determined that the "Mid-2010" (MacBook7,1) model actually supports 8 GB of RAM running Mac OS X 10.6 "Snow Leopard" and 16 GB of RAM running OS X 10.7.5 "Lion" or higher and the latest EFI update."

    My mistake I didn't look at his model identifier
     
  7. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #7
    No need to worry Gav, no damage done :)
     
  8. weedeemer, May 18, 2015
    Last edited: May 18, 2015

    weedeemer thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 18, 2015
    #8
    Ok :) but, which ram?
    i.e. if i buy no-name brand (cheap) - what should i pay attention to? Chip manufacturer, some codes printed on the chip? I really don't know how to express what i mean. (how to formulate question right... I'm not a native English speaker so that might be the problem)

    Probably the original question should be like:
    What determines which ram chip is 'acceptable' by the board ....by the specific memory controller or any other chip that is on the mainboard
     
  9. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #9
    Any generic ram fitting the above specs will function fine.
     
  10. ApolloBoy macrumors 6502a

    ApolloBoy

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2015
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #10
    I would just go for a name brand. I tried doing a 16 GB upgrade once on my mid-2010 MacBook which used generic sticks and I got kernel panics up the wazoo. Right now I've got a couple of 4 GB Corsair sticks in it and it works perfectly fine with those. I've also had luck with Crucial and Hynix.
     
  11. brdeveloper macrumors 68020

    brdeveloper

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2010
    Location:
    Brasil
    #11
    It's not that other modules won't work, but the best match would be 2x4GB 1066 MHz, 1.5V, CL7 modules (if I'm not wrong, the "normal" latency of 1066 modules is CL9, but the bundled 2GBs of RAM were CL7).

    In my late-2009 I have "unbranded mac-compatible" CL7 2x4GB 1066 modules (bought from a chinese seller on Ebay; it works flawlessly for about 4 years). In my 2010 Mac Mini I use 2x8GB 1333MHz Corsair Value modules with SPDs rewritten to be recognized as 1066MHz modules.

    Both of them are far from being "officially compatible" modules, but they work very well... I can't remember of any crash pattern or something.
     
  12. Dimwhit macrumors 68000

    Dimwhit

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    #12
    I always go to Crucial.com and use their tool advisor. As a plus, it's good RAM for a good price.
     

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