How do I know the recommended settings for a game?

Discussion in 'Mac and PC Games' started by MacBH928, May 18, 2018.

  1. MacBH928 macrumors 68030

    MacBH928

    Joined:
    May 17, 2008
    #1
    I have 2015 MBP and downloaded the Mac version of Left4Dead, the game resolution defaulted to 800x600 . I have a hard time accepting thats the best my MBP can do on a 10 year old game. Its so pixelated it looks like you are playing MineCraft.

    Any one knows how can I find out what are the best settings for my computer? (Without stressing the hardware and burning the CPU, I used to get 90C/194F temps on my older macbook)
     
  2. wubsylol macrumors 6502

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    Nov 6, 2014
    #2
    "Recommended" settings rarely provide the best play experience. Increase the settings incrementally until you reach the sweet spot of visuals vs performance.

    Temps wise; that's about what you should expect from an Apple portable.
     
  3. Irishman macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    #3

    Yeah, something's not right, as I'm running a late 2012 21.5" iMac, and have played Left 4 Dead 2 on it for many years, and routinely get 85 fps at the Ultra settings, at 1920 x 1080p. See this thread from back in December of 2016: https://forums.macrumors.com/threads/the-60-fps-thread.2022206/

    I think you might be confused by default settings on a game, and recommended settings. Have you turned on the frame counter in Steam yet, so that you can measure and display your fps?

    If not, go back and run the game again, and write down the average framerate you see. Also, you didn't say if you're having any framerate issues with the game. Is it playing smooth? If so, the turn the settings as far up as you can, until you experience stutters in the game.

    Then, after your little experiment, come back and update us with what you've found.
     
  4. MacBH928 thread starter macrumors 68030

    MacBH928

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    May 17, 2008
    #4
    On laptops its a different story. you can maximize your desktop, but on laptops pushing the hardware can damage the internals due to the tight enclosure, high heat, fans, batteries...etc The fans get really loud and you can feel the heat from outside the aluminum case. It won't explode but it will degrade the life of the components big time.
     
  5. Irishman macrumors 68030

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    #5

    If you're too worried about damaging your MacBook to try my suggestions, then I'm not sure how we can help you.
     
  6. MacBH928 thread starter macrumors 68030

    MacBH928

    Joined:
    May 17, 2008
    #6
    I am sorry, I just meant that I am not looking for the maximum output my hardware can handle... I was looking for the safe zone that won't damage my macbook. The horror stories of the flimsy Apple hardware does not help either, they are not built to last.
     
  7. Irishman macrumors 68030

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    Nov 2, 2006
    #7
    Sure they are. Turn up your settings and have fun.
     
  8. ricmcgmr macrumors member

    ricmcgmr

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    Feb 16, 2015
    #8
    I know people like Feral spend a lot of time figuring out recommend settings for their games, but I have the feeling most just flip a coin. Especially those old Valve games.

    Just do what I do, I set the game at 1280x800 on my MacBook and medium settings and see how it goes. If too slow, I will go down to low, if too fast, I'll try a higher resolution!
     
  9. MacBH928 thread starter macrumors 68030

    MacBH928

    Joined:
    May 17, 2008
    #9
    Thank you for your advice,
    My point is that sometimes your hardware will support a higher setting but might damage the internals in the long run. I doubt those tight stuck components in this thin case will survive a lot of heat. As I mentioned earlier, my older macbook runs up to 90C/194F. That can't be good.

    I was told CPU temp. in desktops average around 40-65C.
     
  10. wubsylol macrumors 6502

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    Nov 6, 2014
    #10
    Unless you want to run at 640x480 potato mode, the settings you choose are going to have zero impact on your overall temps. The GPU is going to max out regardless; your performance will just be higher/lower depending on the setting.

    Unless you plan on keeping your system for 20+ years, you aren't doing "long term damage" to your system by running at high temps.
     
  11. MacBH928 thread starter macrumors 68030

    MacBH928

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    May 17, 2008
    #11
    This does not sound right, are you saying if you run 4K or 720P the hardware will be pushed to its maximum limits either way?
     
  12. garnerx macrumors 6502

    garnerx

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    Nov 9, 2012
    #12
    It isn't right. If you have vsync turned off then some games might allows the GPU to run flat out, generating 1000 fps or something silly. Just turn vsync on and it won't happen.

    The normal way to find optimum settings is by turning as many things up as possible until the framerate becomes unacceptable, but if you wanted to tune it for low temperatures I guess you'd start turning up settings until you hit whatever arbitrary temperature threshold you've decided won't melt your Mac.

    A bit of a waste of time having a nice computer if you're not prepared to let it get warm, though.
     
  13. Irishman macrumors 68030

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    #13

    Yup, I can echo my success in that strategery. :)
     
  14. MacBH928 thread starter macrumors 68030

    MacBH928

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    May 17, 2008
    #14
    The question is, how warm is safe?
    I heard people argue for both sides claiming no matter how hot it gets it won't damage the computer, others say hitting warm tempretures will deteriorate your computer faster
     
  15. Irishman macrumors 68030

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    Nov 2, 2006
    #15
    You're obsessing. We can't help you not to obsess. :)

    I'm not sure why you even bought a MacBook if you're that worried about temps while running games. Why not sell it and get a desktop Mac?
     
  16. garnerx macrumors 6502

    garnerx

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    #16
    That's just plain ridiculous. Buy a console.
     
  17. Irishman macrumors 68030

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    Nov 2, 2006
    #17

    I'm afraid that even that won't solve his problem. The fan on our PS4 runs non-stop. Super-loud. We still play it. Over 2 years with no crashes or problems.
     
  18. garnerx macrumors 6502

    garnerx

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    Nov 9, 2012
    #18
    But at least his Mac will stay nice and frosty.

    I've got a 2009 MBP that gets red hot just streaming videos these days. Such is the fate of all laptops - eventually it's hopelessly out of date and struggles to run modern stuff and you wonder why you wasted all that time obsessing about keeping it in pristine condition.
     
  19. MacBH928 thread starter macrumors 68030

    MacBH928

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    May 17, 2008
    #19
    well just so you know I am not paranoid its a real issue I looked up:
    https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/56972/what-are-the-maximum-temperatures-for-my-macbook-pro
    http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-2283643/normal-safe-cpu-temps-volts-macbook-laptop.html
    https://www.reddit.com/r/macgaming/comments/5ksmgb/safe_temperatures_on_macbook_airs/
     
  20. garnerx macrumors 6502

    garnerx

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    Nov 9, 2012
    #21
    Well, if three people on the internet said so I guess it must be true. I will make sure my 9-year-old Macbook never gets above 60C again.

    There are several good suggestions for what to do in the rest of this thread that you've opted to ignore, so at this point I think you're just having a laugh :)
     
  21. virtualking macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2018
    #22
    Recommended setting are the one which are minimum required but you can modify or up the settings as per your need
     
  22. h9826790 macrumors G4

    h9826790

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    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #23
    This temperature does't applicable to iMac.

    iMac is a desktop, but still with some laptop hardware, and the cooling system is not better than a laptop. The CPU can still easily run to ~100C.

    For modern Intel CPU, anything below 100C is actually very safe. And it's super hard to kill a CPU by overheating. The CPU will get into thermal throttling when over a specific assigned temperature. If the cooling system completely failed, and the CPU temperature still going up. It will command the computer for a thermal shutdown. And this is nothing more than a protection, up to this point, the CPU still not damaged yet.

    TBH, 90C sounds high, but that's for human being, not for an Intel CPU. For CPU, 90C may be still in turbo boost mode. Which means the CPU believe itself still has thermal headroom to run faster. Definitely nowhere near any thermal damage temperature.

    HOWEVER, that's only true for the CPU itself. The safe temperature for the surrounding electronics (on the PCB) is unknown. But in general, anything up to 105C should not be a problem (This is a very common max temperature for VRM on a modern motherboard or the Northbridge chip in the old days).

    For your info, there are 2 type of fans for the PS4 (original model), one (Nidec) is much quieter than the other one (Delta).

    My PS4 come with the Delta fan, that jet noise annoying me for years. And once I replace it by the Nidec fan, the fan noise reduce to a much more reasonable level. It never spin up to level 4. Spin up to level 3 much much later and only really when necessary, once loading reduced, will drop back to Level 2 straight away. Also, the noise signature (the pitch) is not that annoying.

    You can almost always find something on the internet to support your point of view. However, the majority of users just happily using that Mac up to 100C and says nothing on the net (because the Mac just work, and they don't even bother to check the temperature).

    Anyway, I own a real desktop Mac, the Mac Pro, which comes with a huge heatsink. And Apple decide to let the fans only run at about 20% to keep the noise level at an almost inaudible level. With that fan profile, my CPU ran at 80-85C (T-diode temperature) 24/7 for many years now. And it still working. And guess what? Intel's official max for my CPU is just 67.5C (T-case). For 2015 MBP CPU (e.g. 4980HQ), the official max temperature is 100C (T-junction)
     

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