How do I stop Mac from prompting me (to input admin password) when installing?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by MythicFrost, May 1, 2009.

  1. MythicFrost macrumors 68040

    MythicFrost

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Australia
    #1
    I'd like to know how to stop Mac from prompting me with the 'Enter an administrator account and password' dialog, I'd just like to install things, I do have a 'Managed' account (with Parental controls), but how do I stop that? is there a setting???

    Kind Regards
    Me
     
  2. Jethryn Freyman macrumors 68020

    Jethryn Freyman

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2007
    Location:
    Australia
    #2
    It will prompt you for the password when logged in as either a standard account or administrator account. If you log in as the root user, it won't prompt you, but it's not a good idea, as it gives every application unlimited access to your system. A simple programming error could damage system files, and you'll be far more vulnerable to trojans and such.
     
  3. MythicFrost thread starter macrumors 68040

    MythicFrost

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Australia
    #3
    Hmm, I see, I've allowed all access for me to Read & Write in my main Hard drive.. and also the applications folder, is that bad?

    Kind Regards
    Me
     
  4. hector macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2006
    Location:
    Cheltenham, UK
    #4
    I have never (in 5 years of being a mac user) been prompted to enter my password when not installing something I chose to.
    Are you saying that a trojan would ask my permission for me to install it, and then I would think 'hmm I didn't choose to install this?' and not enter my password?

    If so, does this mean that I have never had a single breach of security in half a decade?
     
  5. ihabime macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2005
    #5
    Yes, that's the definition of a trojan, something that tricks you into installing it because you think it's useful software or in the case of the recent iWork malware it was malicious code added to torrented copies.

    That's why trojans are much harder to defend against than viruses, your machine can be rock solid secure, but it doesn't mean anything if someone with an admin account isn't careful what they install.
     
  6. Jethryn Freyman macrumors 68020

    Jethryn Freyman

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2007
    Location:
    Australia
    #6
    Exactly this.

    You can't defend against trojans, if you can install an application onto your computer, you can install a trojan. A trojan is just a simple application.
     
  7. ppc750fx macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    #7
    Yes.

    Regards,
    Me

    -------

    No. It's fine -- you have nothing to worry about...

    Regards,
    Everyone who wants to use your Mac
     
  8. MythicFrost thread starter macrumors 68040

    MythicFrost

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Australia
    #8
    So I should do what to fix it?

    Kind Regards
    Me
     
  9. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    Georgia
    #9
    Programs only ask for a password when installing files to a system folder such as the System or the root directory Library. There are many other system folders and files at the root directory but they are hidden.

    So for a virus to be effective it needs to install into those areas thus asking for your password. Since by default the administrator accounts do not have write access to these files/folders just read. Entering your password temporarily gives you permission to write as well.

    Maybe an Applescript could be written that monitors for the password dialogue to automatically input the password then OK the dialogue. I would not know if this is possible though. You want to have a password set because for some reason having a blank password makes sudo (superuser/root) commands not work in Terminal.

    You can do as Jethryn Freyman suggested and enable the root user and login that way to "fix this". But you just open yourself up to problems as mentioned. I would not do this. I would only use the root account when I am tweaking a lot of System files and don't want to be bothered with a lot of other maintenance to make the files usable by the system again. Even with that said I still do not use the root user and instead opt to input chmod/chown commands into Terminal to set permissions then run Disk Utility.

    Enabling the root user


    You will have to login at the loginscreen and have it set for you to type in both the username and password.
     
  10. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    #10
    Well, you said you gave yourself those permissions, so just undo what you did. Seems like there may have been a reason you were given a managed account.
     
  11. Dunmail macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Location:
    Skipton, UK
    #11
    The original post suggested that the OP had a managed account with parental controls and that he'd like to install applications. This suggests that he cannot enter an admin username/password combination. How then has he managed to enable read-write access on the whole hard drive for which root access is required?

    I think more information is required here.
     
  12. synagence macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    #12
    The best trojans for the mac will now be subtly embedding into the installers of popular software on the torrents ...

    Its the easiest entry vector ... you still get the app you downloaded and installed and it even works perfectly ...... you just get a little quiet hidden extra that you didn't bargain for

    This is why Windows Vista introduced User Account Control .... a means to bug the user to convince the OS that what it was installing was intentional ... even MS admitted they made it deliberately annoying
     
  13. ppc750fx macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2008
    #13
    Neither UAC nor sudo nor Apple's admin privileges dialog box will stop users from installing trojans.

    You can't protect against stupidity.

    UAC wasn't added in an attempt to stop trojans. It was added in an attempt to balance the backwards compatibility requirement of "everyone is an admin" with the least-privileged principle of security. It's a half-ass compromise, but MS couldn't do much more without breaking stuff in a big way.
     
  14. MythicFrost thread starter macrumors 68040

    MythicFrost

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Australia
    #14
    I ask because, I can't remember exactly if I changed the main hard drive security settings or not, is there a way to set it to it's default?
    I don't want to disable write access if it wasn't initially disabled...

    Kind Regards
    Me
     
  15. Jethryn Freyman macrumors 68020

    Jethryn Freyman

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2007
    Location:
    Australia
    #15
    Go to Disk Utility and repair permissions.
     

Share This Page