How do you address a police academy student?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by 63dot, May 15, 2008.

  1. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #1
    I am newly in law school, again, and the police academy in a nearby town has been going through renovations so they share the same building as the law school.

    The police academy seems very militaristic and the students address all lawyers and law students as "sir" or "madam"

    In some states lawyers are officers of the court with judges, and other states include bailiffs, stenographers, and law students as court officers

    Is there a certain etiquette for a law student or lawyer to respond to a police academy student when they say hello "sir" or hello "madam"?

    It's kind of scary with the force the academy students address their professors and legal personnel and sometimes when they are marching down the hall in formation every single student makes this military sounding salutation

    ...do you say hello, or salute, or what ?
     
  2. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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  3. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #3
    i have never been in the military, so what does that mean?

    i really have no clue
     
  4. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #5
    In Australia we address them as "mate" until they graduate - then when they're full fledged police officers we call them "mate."


    I'm serious. We don't call them "officer" unless they start to get official.
     
  5. StealthRider macrumors 65816

    StealthRider

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    #6
    If it's anything like how we do things, it'll sound something like this (if I'm wrong, let me know):

    The cadet/candidate/midshipman/whatever will say something to the effect of:

    "Good morning/afternoon/evening, sir/madam/ma'am."

    The proper response for you, then, would be:

    "Good morning/afternoon/evening."

    Keep it simple :)
     
  6. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #7
    thank you so much, i was so scared since i know one day, if i am speeding, in my small town of 1,900 people, it will be me calling them sir or madam and any time a cop has ever pulled me over, i treated them like the president of the universe :)

    and the california highway patrol, just by their power, and a lot from the tv show "chips", have an almost godlike aura about them...many people i know are either fascinated and/or frightened of them

    those funny gold helmets, for chp motorcycle officers, are certainly an icon without equal in california

    ok, the red bikinis of female lifeguards ranks higher :)

    btw...i have far more respect for cops than any lawyers or judges...i just don't see "spin" with cops, just if i broke the law or not, and i like that honesty

    i just want to start off on the right foot...our town is literally that small

    so i will say "good morning", "good afternoon", or "good evening"
     
  7. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #8
    Here if you got pulled over it would go:

    PO - "Good afternoon sir/madam"

    You - "Yeah G'Day mate"

    PO - "In a bit of a hurry today"

    You - "No officer, I wasn't speeding"

    PO - "Bullsh*t you weren't, I saw ya"

    You - "You did not, you're drunk"

    PO - "Sir, I can assure you I am sober, speaking of which would you mind counting to ten while I administer a breath test"

    You - "Nup, get f*cked copper!!!"

    You then speed off into the distance while the copper gently shakes his head smiling and muttering to himself "Huh, fair enough, the little smartarse got me there."
     
  8. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #9

    i love it...i have to stay quiet and not laugh loudly since wifey is sleeping :)

    i could say, "you catch 'em, i and i set 'em free, copper!"
     
  9. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #10
    Address them as "Little fella" or "boy". They love that.
     
  10. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

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    #11
    I'm pretty much just guessing here, but it sounds like maybe they're practicing being respectful and deferential to those in authority. Somebody probably told them to do it. Ticking off a DA, judge or non-uniformed officer will be potentially career-limiting someday.

    Don't salute back. It's not the military, you're not their officer and you'll just look like a dork. Try to accept it graciously. Smile and nod in acknowledgement. It's always acceptable to address another adult as "ma'am" or "sir," so feel free to do that as appropriate, but don't feel like you have to match them sir-for-sir.

    Or, you know, I could be totally off. The behavior is common enough you feel like asking about it, so maybe try asking one of your mentors there at the school how the relationship works.
     
  11. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #12
    If there's anything I learned from Al Borland, it's that a two-fingered salute is never out of fashion.
     
  12. EricNau Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

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    #13
    I believe their official title is cadet, which is usually how they will introduce themselves (e.g. "Good afternoon, I'm Cadet Wilson").

    Although, if you're responding to their greeting, a smile and simple response (e.g. "Good afternoon") would be perfectly acceptable. ...Don't salute.

    If you ever strike up a conversation with one of them, it never hurts to ask. :)
     
  13. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

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    #14
    California freeways have taught me the same thing about one-fingered salutes. :D
     
  14. Iscariot macrumors 68030

    Iscariot

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    #15
    Is San Fran traffic as bad as L.A. traffic?
     
  15. djellison macrumors 68020

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    Pasadena CA
    #16
    If they have a gun - 'Sir' or "Ma'm'

    If they don't - 'Kid'

    :)

    Doug
     
  16. Chundles macrumors G4

    Chundles

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    #17
    They've all got guns here, still call them mate.
     
  17. RedTomato macrumors 68040

    RedTomato

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    #18
    Ask one of your lecturers or professors or any staffer. No doubt they all know about it and have been having their own discussions. Best to ask a few different ones to make sure you get a range of opinions.

    Also why not ask some of the police academy students themselves? People are surprisingly responsive to someone asking them a question about something they've just done.

    PAS: Good MORNing SUR!

    You: Good morning.

    PAS: ...<swish> .. <click> .. <thud>..

    You: One moment please?

    PAS: Sure thing SUH!

    You: I'm new here / I've noticed a lot of people here calling me sir / saluting. I'm never sure how to respond. Would you mind explaining it to me?

    PAS: NO PROBlem. Just <bla bla bla bla>

    You: Thank you very much for your time, and good luck. Good bye.

    PAS: NO PROBlem SUH! Good-BYE!
     
  18. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #19
    Suggest only using sir and ma'am. Drop the madam bit.
     
  19. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

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    #20
    funny that? official -> officer…

    Here if you got pulled over it would go:

    haha mate… sooo loving you right now!…

    or it could go

    Constable: "Good afternoon sir/madam"

    You: "G'Day mate"

    Constable: "In a bit of a hurry today? You just ran a light"

    You - "Nah sorry mate, I never ran a light"

    Constable: "Bullsh*t you weren't, I saw ya!"

    You - "WTF as if mate… were buddies here!"

    Constable: "Alright then let me check your Driver's Licensce "

    Constable: "Nup, get f*cked copper!!!"

    You then speed off into the distance while the copper gently shakes his head smiling and muttering to himself "Huh, fair enough, the little smartarse got me there
     
  20. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

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    #21
    I've never had to drive in L.A., so I can't say for sure, but my understanding is generally no. It has its moments, to be sure.
     
  21. Gray-Wolf macrumors 68030

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  22. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #24
    that makes sense

    the first time i heard it in a political sense was with madeline albright as the press often referred to her as madam secretary, and never, "hey you, lady secretary of state" :)

    the second time i heard it in a political fashion, it was when nancy pelosi became speaker of the house of representatives, and she became madam speaker...i always grew up hearing mr. speaker and i remember an interview with a senator that said, "the president runs the usa (in a ceremonial sense), but the speaker runs WASHINGTON

    i have been reading a book on washington protocol and while some of the military stuff was somewhat foreign to me, the protocol around congress people, ambassadors, and other leaders was downright strange, down to bizarre seating arrangements and memos

    there have been many jokes about how vp dick cheney was the real boss, and george w bush being the "yes man", but that may or may not be true, but in constitutional law, the speaker of the house can almost act as master of the universe...kind of strange since the usa wanted to discourage anybody being close to a monarch, and thus limited the power of the president and spread all power evenly over many people with no real point person

    over the years, the speaker of the house, some say during the long democratic white house reign from '33-'53 expanded the speaker's power...today, nancy pelosi, known for being outspoken and sometimes not representative of the middle of the road, is feared and highly criticized by many in the middle and on the right...so instead of madam....he he...i am sure some congress people have other titles for her :)
     
  23. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #25
    ok, that's it folks...best answer of all :)

    where i live, small town usa, the young adults go to police academy *at the junior college which is still under construction/remodel, then they spread their wings right before and immediately after they graduate working on the state parks land which used to be an army base, and then they make it to a city nearby

    what's funny is the in between stage, when they just graduated and are riding the patrol cars and motorcycles on the state parks land...he he...so many of the male officers are desperately trying to grow a mustache and more times than not, it's like 14 year old peach fuzz, and to make matters worse, they all take to a #1 buzz cut, so they look like chickens that have just been hatched

    my good friend used to be chief or assistant chief at the army base federal police station and he would get a lot of interns right after school before they got placed in a city, and his stories were hilarious...he loved to cross dress and his wife helped him pick out clothes, yes in women's clothes - like fbi head j edgar hoover but never at work, and the young, newly minted officers were terrified of him since he had his macho side, too and i doubt any of the officers under him ever knew :)

    and for chief "i won't mention his name", the salutation is definitely "madam"
     

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