How do you ISO?

How often do you use Auto ISO?

  • All Auto, all the time

    Votes: 2 3.4%
  • Mostly Auto

    Votes: 20 34.5%
  • 50/50 Auto/Manual

    Votes: 5 8.6%
  • Mostly Manual

    Votes: 12 20.7%
  • Only Manual

    Votes: 19 32.8%

  • Total voters
    58

mollyc

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Aug 18, 2016
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I bought a Z6 the other day. I haven’t even used it yet but set some custom settings and I turned off auto ISO. So confusing to me. :eek:
 
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mollyc

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Aug 18, 2016
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Love to hear how you get on with it.
I’ll report back in a week or two!

First try at mirrorless? Can you reuse all your old lenses?
Yes first mirrorless. The EVF looks like I’m playing a video game. Will take a bit to get used to.

And I got the adapter as part of the kit but I also got the native z mount 24-70 f4. So I can still use my existing lenses (although I lose the weight advantage then).
 
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Darmok N Jalad

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Sep 26, 2017
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I’ll report back in a week or two!



Yes first mirrorless. The EVF looks like I’m playing a video game. Will take a bit to get used to.

And I got the adapter as part of the kit but I also got the native z mount 24-70 f4. So I can still use my existing lenses (although I lose the weight advantage then).
Well, I hope you enjoy it. I found I am a mirrorless person, but the EVF is a must!
 
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bunnspecial

macrumors 604
May 3, 2014
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Kentucky
Same here. I always use full stops for ISO, I guess it’s a mild OCD thing. Same with aperture generally but I’m more flexible with it and will go to f9, f13 etc if I have the perfect shutter speed dialled in for my shot.
There again, my mindset when working with digitals often reflects the mechanical film cameras I work with.

"In-between" apertures don't really bother me that much since, in many cases(as I mentioned) film speed is fixed for the roll and also on many cameras the shutter can only be changed in full stop increments. By contrast, the aperture is USUALLY stepless, even though it will typically have full stop clicks. Of course, my old C Hasselblad lenses are the exception, as I can only get half stops on the aperture and full stops on the shutter speed.

Of course, there are also plenty of exceptions to this. The Nikon F2 is fully mechanical but also stepless from 1/90 to 1/2000 and also from 2 seconds to 10 seconds, although I doubt its accuracy at 1/2000(and speeds slower than 1 second use the self timer, which is not as tightly regulated as the shutter timer). Electronic aperture priority Nikons from the 70s and 80s are also stepless in Aperture Priorty. Given a stepless shutter speed, I will often keep the aperture where I want it and let the shutter speed fall where it wants as long as it is fast enough(or slow enough) for the scene. I'll also mention that if I get brave and use a camera like the FA, I never use it in shutter priority or program since-with the way these systems work-you will get a correct exposure but probably NOT actually get the shutter speed OR aperture you selected/were told by the camera when the shutter fires.
 
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Darmok N Jalad

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Only manual. Was thinking of some cases where I might put a cap on max ISO range and let it choose the setting within the range, but have not actually implemented such strategy so far.
Simply trying to keep ISO @ min possible.

Found this graph to be useful as well: http://photonstophotos.net/Charts/PDR.htm#Sony ILCE-7RM3
That’s a nifty tool. I found that dpreview also does a good job of mentioning upper ISO limits on their camera reviews. Seems like we smaller sensor shooters need to be more mindful of higher ISO than our full frame friends. :)
 
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Mark0

macrumors 6502
Sep 11, 2014
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I wonder which ISO gives the best DR if that is dependent at all?

On the original question. I set the Aperture and AUTO ISO most of the time.
Generally it is the native ISO for the camera. In my X-T2 it was ISO 200. On my Canon 5D it was ISO 100. On my X-T3 it is ISO 160.
 

Darmok N Jalad

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Interesting results. I figured we'd have a Manual heavy result, but there's a pretty strong mostly Auto component. I remember changing from a Nikon D5300 partially because it lacked an Auto mode, but now that I've had a few years to mess with feature-rich cameras and really understand the relationships, it probably wouldn't have bothered me as much. Ah, tools in the hands of amateurs!

I still remember film cameras and my parents talking about "film speed." Talk about manual mode....
 
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Ledgem

macrumors 68000
Jan 18, 2008
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Thanks so much! Where can I find this information for my canon 6D M2?
Photons to Photos is a nice website run by a fellow who does a lot of testing of various cameras. Your 6D Mk2 is in his database (I made a link for you here); based on that graph, the absolute best dynamic range occurs at around 160. It seems like you don't get a significant drop in dynamic range until you go above ISO 400, but even then it maintains decently until ISO 1600 or so, when the dynamic range begins to drop off more steeply.
 

Mark0

macrumors 6502
Sep 11, 2014
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Thanks so much! Where can I find this information for my canon 6D M2?
I’m not sure but I imagine it will be 100. I remember reading years ago (about my old original 5D) that the ISO should be used in full stops for best results, for example: 100, 200, 400, 800 etc rather than using the incremental ISO’s such as 125, 250, 320 etc (I cant even think of others as I never use ISO that way!) the exception is my X-T3 as it has a base native ISO of 160, so I’m fine with it!
 
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bunnspecial

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May 3, 2014
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I still remember film cameras and my parents talking about "film speed." Talk about manual mode....
There again, when you use both, it's easy to get into the mindset/practice of ISO being your least manipulated value.

With that said, I do occasionally do stand development of B&W film in Rodinal. This is a great "lazy" way to develop film since you basically just load it up and leave it alone for an hour or so(this gives you a great, low contrast negative, but Rodinal tends to give very grainy results). With stand development, though, you CAN actually change the EI of the film from frame to frame, and within reason all will develop more or less correctly, although the best results are usually still from exposing at EI=ASA.

The chemistry behind this happening is interesting. It's a well recognized phenomenon that any developer will suffer "local exhaustion" at areas that received more light, meaning that the developing rate pretty dramatically drops off because the developer basically gets used up. Conventional developers are periodically(every 30 seconds or 1 minute) agitated(usually the tank is inverted a few times) to bring fresh, unexhausted developer to the film service. Stand development is NOT agitated at all, and you use a very dilute solution of high activity developer. What this means is that overexposed frames very quickly exhaust the developer near them and development essentially stops there, subject only to the rate of diffusion of "fresh" developer to the surface. By contrast, frames with less exposure keep going, since the developer doesn't get exhausted at those sites as quickly.

There again, though, it's not an every day technique since there are downsides to doing it this way.
 
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swissbob

macrumors member
Apr 24, 2019
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Love to hear how you get on with it.
I added a Z7 to my D500.

With the Nikon F to Z Adapter all lenses work flawlessly. The AF is very fast with Z and F Mount lenses.

The Camera feels very reliable and the XQD Cards are incredible fast.
Unfortunately there is no battery grip and only 1 card slot.

I use both Auto iso and Manual Mode. It depends from the circumstances.

Let me know If you have any questions.
 

Apple fanboy

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Feb 21, 2012
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I added a Z7 to my D500.

With the Nikon F to Z Adapter all lenses work flawlessly. The AF is very fast with Z and F Mount lenses.

The Camera feels very reliable and the XQD Cards are incredible fast.
Unfortunately there is no battery grip and only 1 card slot.

I use both Auto iso and Manual Mode. It depends from the circumstances.

Let me know If you have any questions.
Thanks. I’m not really in the market for a new camera at the moment.

I’m fine without a battery grip. Last time I had one was for my D300, but I mostly left it at home.

One card slot would could concern me. But in reality it’s more of a safeguard than something I’ve ever had to rely on.

I think I’ll stick with my D750/D7100 combo for a while. See what happens in the industry in the next few years.
 
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swissbob

macrumors member
Apr 24, 2019
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I think I’ll stick with my D750/D7100 combo for a while. See what happens in the industry in the next few years.
That‘s a very good combo:)

I had the combo D800E with the D7100, worked great.

The handling of the Z7 is a bit tricky, If you put it on a 200-500 nikkor:D
 

Robotti

macrumors regular
Oct 16, 2014
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I remember changing from a Nikon D5300 partially because it lacked an Auto mode, but now that I've had a few years to mess with feature-rich cameras and really understand the relationships, it probably wouldn't have bothered me as much.
But there is an Auto iso adjustment in D5300, with the minimum and maximum iso control and shutter speed limit control.
 

mollyc

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Aug 18, 2016
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I didn't opt to get the Z6 solely for the weight savings. I knew with F mount lenses that would be negligible. I will say that the camera with the kit 24-70 f/4 lens *is* much smaller and easier to carry for the day. So from that perspective, as a versatile day trip kit it does fit the bill.

I like the larger focal point coverage (nearly 90% of the frame). I like the joystick for moving the focal points (I missed that from my Canon days) although I think that's in newer Nikon dSLR bodies than I own. I like the in body stabilization (I can handhold to 1/30). The battery life so far isn't a problem for me.

I am struggling with figuring out backlit studio images, but this is not something I shoot often. And I'm only working on it because I read it is a limitation specifically to EVF. It's not something I really worry about though as I don't often shoot directly into a flash.

I still don't need auto ISO though. :)