How do you know if it will meter??

12991

macrumors member
Original poster
Feb 3, 2007
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robbieduncan

Moderator emeritus
Jul 24, 2002
24,597
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Harrogate
When you say meter do you really mean auto-focus? I'm a Canon user myself but my understanding is that the D40 will only auto-focus when the lens has a focus motor in it as Nikon decided to remove the motor and screw drive from the body.
 

12991

macrumors member
Original poster
Feb 3, 2007
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No, i meant meter...

Canon user, gosh

jk... but i meant meter
 

robbieduncan

Moderator emeritus
Jul 24, 2002
24,597
60
Harrogate
OK then. A very tiny amount of Google research gives a chart on this page which indicates which lenses will meter via the acronym in the lens name.

So, for example, the first lens you link to claims to be AF-D. A quick look at the chart shows it will meter.
 

12991

macrumors member
Original poster
Feb 3, 2007
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thanks... I googled it as well, but i couldnt find it. I guess every varying search brings different results
 

OreoCookie

macrumors 68030
Apr 14, 2001
2,680
69
Sendai, Japan
Except for the second lens, they will all meter. All autofocus lenses allow for metering while only very, very few manual focus lenses will do that on your body (e. g. the PC Nikkor).

Interestingly enough, except for the Sigma 50 mm, none of the other lenses are macro lenses! On the other hand, since you have a D40, you will need an internal focus motor of AF-S to be able to autofocus with that body.
 

ChrisA

macrumors G4
Jan 5, 2006
11,641
406
Redondo Beach, California
How do you know if a lens will meter with the Nikon D40...
Very simple answer: If the lens has electronic contacts on the mount it will meter with the D40. This means all autofocus types of lenses will meter.

The D40's problem is not with the meter. It is with auto-focus. The body lacks a motor and therefore can only autofocus with lenses that have their own built-in motor.

I use a very old manual focus 60mm macro lens. It does not meter with my D50. But then in a way it does because I can take a test shot and look at the histogram display. It's hard to think of a better light meter than a histogram. A lot of times I'll use a studio strobe system and there is no way other then full manual even with an AF-S lens. I simply set aperture for the DOF I want, the shutter depending on how much ambient light I want mixed in and then adjust the strobe power based on the histogram display.
 

Digital Skunk

macrumors 604
Dec 23, 2006
7,855
354
In my imagination
All Nikon glass that is AF-S will meter. If it isn't AF-S it doesn't have an integrated motor and will not AF on the D40.

Metering will occur with any lens sans manual focusing ones that don't have the electronic contacts that connect them to the camera.
 

ChrisA

macrumors G4
Jan 5, 2006
11,641
406
Redondo Beach, California
Im currently buying a macro lens for my D40, and i was hoping to buy a cheaper model, as the ones specifically for the D40 are wayy too expensive.
None of those you listed are very good. They are all zoom lenses with a "macro" setting. This just means they will focus "close". What you want is a fixed foal length "prime" macro lens. Any Nikon lke this will be dead sharp with better resolution then the digital sensor can record. Nikon made these for years with manual focus then made many with autofocus. The MF lenses will sell used now for $100 or less. Any except the "pre AI" will work. Not many of those old early 1960's lenses still around and if you do find a pre AI lense it can be converted to AI, even DIY if you are very bave.

If cost is a real problem buy a et of diopters. These look like filters and screw on the lens. Many of these are poor quality but both Nikon and Canon make some good quality diaopters. I would recommend buying only those brands