How?-Faster Ethernet Transferring Speed

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by rekhyt, Apr 3, 2010.

  1. rekhyt macrumors 65816

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    #1
    My friend and I decided to use ethernet wires to transfer files on our Macs instead of USBs last month.

    We soon found a limitation of 10MB/s on the wires. I searched to see if there was 100MB/s ethernet wires but had found none; However, I had found there was such technology as the Gigabit Ethernet (?), but it requires a card.

    Is the 10MB/s limitation from the MacBook/Pro or from the wire?

    Thanks,
    R
     
  2. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

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    #2
    100Mb = 12.5MB

    Speed of internet and Ethernet is in bits while your Mac shows speeds in bytes. If your Mac/cable can't support more than 100Mb/s, then 10MB/s is normal
     
  3. Tower-Union macrumors 6502

    Tower-Union

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    #3
    What year is your Macbook Pro? And what year/make/model is the other computer? Both computers -SHOULD- have Gigabit ethernet in them. If one of them has 100 MegaBIT ethernet though then your stuck - you can only go as fast as the slowest computer.
     
  4. rekhyt thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #4
    Hmm... I thought 100MB equaled in reality, 100MB/s.

    MacBook Pro (Unibody 2009.), and my friend's is a MacBook Pro 13". How fast should we be getting with an ethernet wire?
     
  5. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #5
    Mb is megabits. MB is megabytes, there are 8 bits in a byte, so 100Mb=12.5MB. And that's the absolute maximum, you'll never hit it in reality.

    Depends on the ethernet cable. I'm guessing you weren't using a Cat5e cable because both of those have gigabit ethernet, or 1000Mb/s, for a max theoretical transfer rate of 125MB/s.
     
  6. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

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    #6
    Even then, that's the data transfer rate of the protocol, not your actual data. Your data is wrapped in packet headers, checksums, and other control information which forms some overhead in the transfer.

    Also, for similar reasons, transferring lots of smaller files is slower than transferring one big file, even if the total amount of data is the same.
     
  7. rekhyt thread starter macrumors 65816

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    #7
    How would we increase our transferring speed? We had been basically using normal LAN wires that are usually used when you get a router, so I guess that was one factor that could have imposed the limitation.

    Would acquiring a Cat5e cable speed up the transfer?
     
  8. jpyc7 macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Actually, even if your Mac is capable of Gigabit ethernet, it might not be configured for it. So first, go into your Network Settings, select your Ethernet interface, then click the Advanced button. Then pick the Ethernet tab. There you can see the settings, including the Speed and Duplex. Basically make sure it is set to the highest speed. You may need to physically disconnect the cables and reconnect for the cards to renegotiate the settings.

    On my Mac, it would appear my default is 100 Mbps, which is fine since I am connected to the Internet via a DSL modem.
     
  9. Tower-Union macrumors 6502

    Tower-Union

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    #9
    Also your router is probably 100MB, so if your running through there you're bottle necking yourselves. Just connect the two computers together directly with one wire.
     
  10. KirstenD macrumors newbie

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    Aug 15, 2011
    #10
    Lot of people have gone faster... Me no, but I do regulary transfer 3-15 Gb files at work over 100 mbit ethernet
     
  11. guzhogi macrumors 68030

    guzhogi

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    #11
    Also depends on whether you're connecting the computers directly with the same cable or going through a switch.

    If going directly between with a single cable, make you get what's called a crossover cable. It makes things easier.

    If you're going through a switch, make sure the switch is capable of Gigabit speeds for fastest speeds.

    Either way, I would suggest Category 6 (or even better, 6a) cabling. Maybe a little more expensive than 5e, but they're made with higher standards. I'm not sure how much of a difference they'll make, but I personally like having the highest quality available.

    As others have mentioned, there is a difference between MB (upper case B) and Mb (lower case b). Basically, 1 MB = 8 Mb.
     

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