How good is iOS at controlling/security?

Discussion in 'iOS 6' started by Bankaimadness, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. Bankaimadness macrumors 6502

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    #1
    I know that when I download an App on an Android, it tells you what it is going to access on the phone.

    What about in iOS? Can Apps still find out information about the phone itself? Like the phone number and stuff?
     
  2. Beeplance macrumors 65816

    Beeplance

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    #2
    Apps will require your permission when they are accessing any of your information or location services. These controls can be found under the "Privacy" menu in Settings. IMO, security for iOS is quite good, compared to Android.
     
  3. mentaluproar macrumors 68000

    mentaluproar

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    #3
    It has a strong a core, but is an enormous target for hackers.
     
  4. Daveoc64 macrumors 601

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    #4
    iOS does not have as many user facing privacy options as Android does.

    There's quite a lot that developers can access without permission, and the things listed in Post #2 were only introduced in iOS 6.
     
  5. sohaloh macrumors regular

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    #5
    I think iOS has amazing core security, around which the whole OS is built. Not only do you need to give permission to every app which requires it, it will ask you multiple times before sharing your information. The user above is wrong in the fact that these settings were always present just in the same place under the privacy tab now. There are many corporate and enterprise deployments of iPhones which kinda shows how good it is in the security department.

    If you're a computer geek and want to get into the nitty gritty's of iOS security, you could consider reading this indepth article by apple.

    http://images.apple.com/ipad/business/docs/iOS_Security_May12.pdf
     
  6. Daveoc64, Nov 9, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012

    Daveoc64 macrumors 601

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    #6
    Good for you!

    Permission for what?

    You shouldn't be asked multiple times for any of the "permissions" - except potentially Location in web browsers. As pointed out, Android has permissions for just about everything, so you can't ever say that iOS is better in this regard.

    No I am not.

    They (permissions for contacts, calendar, reminders, Bluetooth Sharing and Photos) were introduced in iOS 6.0

    I bet you wouldn't say the same thing about Windows...

    Sure, I bet Apple would be critical of their product's security.
     
  7. sohaloh macrumors regular

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    #7
    Lol, dunno why you got so offended. If you're disputing iOS's security as compared to android you're wrong. iOS has adequate security for an average user as well as for more advanced users. The whole point is you don't have a million options in your face which you as a user have to keep track off, and also the absence of a vetted appstore. Android is inherently insecure for multiple reasons. First off is google play, there has been more than one occasion of malware on google play. The platform allows installing apps from third party sources, cracked apps, websites etc. which makes it easier for your device to be compromised. Access of third party apps to core system functionality like the launcher, keyboard, browser etc. Apps can run indefinitely in the background, cause wakelocks, use GPS. The bootloader can easily be unlocked, easy access to root priviledges. Busybox, and other tools can even be installed on an unrooted phone. 2nd Init hacks, fastbooting custom kernels. Besides that if you don't allow access to google data collection when setting up the phone, you cant use google services. CarrierIQ on android was a huge problem too. I can think of even more reasons why android is less secure. Basically if something wants to exploit you on android its much easier if you don't know what you're doing.

    And just because an application states what it has access to before installing is not a very good measure of how secure a system is. iOS security is fine and the article I linked to wasn't apple boasting about how good the security it, its just an explanation of secure boot, SHSH signing, why they dont allow downgrades, hardware and software security. Its an interesting read.

    If you're wondering, I use ubuntu on my computer and have had an android phone for 3 years. I know everything there is to know about android. I personally think iOS is more secure for an average user. If you have any interesting points to make I'd be happy to listen.
     
  8. Daveoc64, Nov 9, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012

    Daveoc64 macrumors 601

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    #8
    My problem is simply that I don't like when people post incorrect information.

    You posted incorrect information, so I corrected it (specifically the part about permissions in iOS 6).

    Posting incorrect information like that, adamantly passing it off as a fact, makes me less likely to think everything else you write is credible - prove me wrong!

    The chances of installing malware are slim to none.

    I'm sure most people would agree that the benefits of being able to install any App that you want far outweighs the potential risks.

    Apps can replace those things, they don't "access" them.

    Explain how this is a security problem

    How is this a security problem?

    Explain how this is a security problem. Then explain why it isn't on iOS.

    No more so than with iOS

    How is this a security problem?

    It wasn't in iOS?

    You haven't given a tangible reason so far!

    You aren't explaining why these things are security problems. You're listing Android features, or potential hacks that you can choose to use to add more functionality that may have security downsides.

    Why not?

    Yet you ignore that other platforms like Windows, Android, Blackberry etc. have had these features and more for longer than iOS has.

    You can't act in an authorative manner about computer security on the internet without being able to justify what you're saying.
     
  9. sohaloh, Nov 9, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012

    sohaloh macrumors regular

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    #9
    The OP asked about the current security/privacy features on iOS. Everyone on this thread explained how these settings were present in the privacy tab. Since iOS 6 is the current version there's no point mentioning the drawbacks of older software.

    Says you.

    Right being able to install anything outweighs the risk of compromising security.

    Yeah so a 3rd party keyboard which requires access to the internet and contacts before getting installed and which can log your keystrokes, addresses, credit card info is not a security threat? A 3rd party browser which can be set as default is not a security threat? Suppose you install a crappy browser and someone sends you a malicious email with a link which opens up in that unpatched browser with a vulnerability.

    So an app which can wake up on its own, and run beyond its assertive times send and do whatever it wants is not a security problem?

    You can set which apps use GPS individually in iOS. You can see which apps are using GPS currently or in the past 24 hours. On android, you either turn off GPS as a whole or uninstall the app you think is using your location services. There is no way to determine when an app used GPS, or when GPS is on how many apps are accessing that information. Couple that with apps running indefinitely in the background with 3rd party apps you think arent a security threat, god knows who has your location data.


    Since when can you unlock the iOS bootloader?


    It's a privacy problem. In iOS you can opt out of sending diagnostic and usage information. You can opt out of ad tracking, you can opt out of location based iAds. So what just because I don't want google to access my location and track me, I cant use gmail, maps, navigation on my phone? They force you to opt in or lose functionality. Is there any log of what information gets sent to google like there is in the diagnostics and usage info in iOS?

    No, your mistaking this with apples own collection of information which was the problem, not carriers hijacking your phone with code and bloatware.

    Thats exactly what I was trying to explain. These are features if you know what you are doing and they have major security downsides not something someone who is concerned about security should take lightly.

    Because it gives you no control. So you either don't install the application, or submit to every thing it needs access to. With iOS I can install an app, choose which functionality I want it to have access to. Suppose I want to play a game which requires my location. I can just say no and play that game without allowing it access. How do you do that on android? You can't. You just don't install it.

    And I'm not acting like anything I simply linked an article to how security and privacy worked on iOS. You are the one who is getting sore. You talk about user facing security option's on android? What exactly are those might I ask and how is android, windows, or blackberry security relevant to this thread?
     
  10. Daveoc64 macrumors 601

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    #10
    So you're basically saying that iOS is more secure because it lets you do fewer things.

    Hardly a winner.

    You are assuming that all third party software is malicious, yet that's absolutely not the case - on any platform.

    That makes your points flawed.

    The fact remains, the OP cannot actually tell what an App can/will do on an iOS device with the same level of granularity as an App on Android.
     
  11. zbarvian macrumors 68010

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    #11
    The main argument boils down to this: which ecosystem has anti-virus programs? It ain't iOS. Malware has gotten into the Play Store time and time again, and poorly coded apps can drain battery or be harmful. I don't need to know the nitty-gritty, I can't ever recall an issue with the App Store or iOS apps behaving similarly.
     
  12. Daveoc64 macrumors 601

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    #12
    Of course, but the number of people that downloaded those Apps is minuscule.

    If your concern is privacy, and you're savvy enough not to download malware, then Android is more verbose in telling you what an App can and cannot do.

    If you want to know that an Offline game has requested permission to connect to the internet, Android will tell you that. iOS cannot.
     
  13. zbarvian macrumors 68010

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    #13
    I'd rather not spend time worrying about software permissions of third-party apps I've downloaded, I can trust the App Store. The same can't be said for the Play Store.
     
  14. Daveoc64 macrumors 601

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    #14
    What makes you think that?

    It's very difficult to actually tell what an App is actually doing on a device.

    Apple can't see the source code.

    They've let several Apps in (Tethering Apps, Emulators, Apps that collect and transmit Contacts without permission) that are strictly against their rules, because they had no way of detecting what the App was actually doing. The Apps went out of their way to conceal what they were doing.

    They've made it harder for Apps to misuse Contacts, but it's still entirely possible for an App to do things that users would be unhappy with.
     

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