How good is the Canon Elura 100 video quality?

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by 66217, Aug 8, 2007.

  1. 66217 Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #1
    I've been searching for so long that I am getting more doubtful if I should buy a High Definition camcorder, or should I stick with a normal one (like Elura 100).

    The video I want to make is for business purposes. It would be displaying in the store, and we are thinking of buying 50" TVs. But if the Elura 100 has good enough quality, we would like to save the extra $500 that a HDD would cost.

    So the question is, would the Elura 100 be enough for this? Would it look grainy?

    Or does the screen size does not matters?:eek:

    Thanks,:)
     
  2. dodong macrumors member

    dodong

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    #2
  3. KJdanReuben macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 22, 2007
    #3
    I have the Canon Elura 100 and absolutely love it! The biggest screen that I have displayed a movie on is our 42" plasma at the house...video quality was beautiful! I believe it would do just fine.
     
  4. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #4
    Do you know where can I find sample videos of an Elura 100? Or a similar camcorder?

    I found some videos at www.canon.com from the HV10 and HV20, which seem to be really nice cameras. And I would like to compare them, to see the difference.

    Thanks for the replies.:)
     
  5. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #5
    I have an Elura 100 and we love it. As for your specific questions ...

    1. I've hooked it up directly to our 46" 1080p LCD and it looks pretty good. Unless you really look closely, you won't see too much pixelation or artifacts.

    2. I really have no basis for a comparision, but you really need good lighting for this camcorder. In low/lower light situations, the video is really grainy. The built-in LED lamp is not very useful, as it A) has a short "casting" distance, and B) projects a very harsh white/blue light.

    I am, by no means, an expert on video shooting, so maybe my results with low lighting is due to not using the right settings, etc. YMMV.

    But for the $300/400, it's hard to beat. Video taken outside in the sunlight is very vivid and clear.
     
  6. 66217 thread starter Guest

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    #6
    What do you consider low light? Would a room without sunlight be OK? It do has light, but nothing compared to an outside situation.
     
  7. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #7
    OK, when I'm talking low light, I mean you are indoors with comfortable amount of light. Maybe one or two lamps (75W each) with shades.

    For example, I caught my baby's early steps in the hallway. There are three separate light fixtures with small candlabra bulbs. I was standing in our bedroom, which was pretty dark. (probably not the best lighting combination) The video was pretty grainy, so I've revised my set-ups.

    What I try to do when I'm filming inside, is to turn on all of the lights in the room and the surrounding ones. This usually casts enough light into the room and the resulting video is pretty good.

    Honestly though, pretty much any entry-level camcorder is going to suck with low light situations. There's no accessory shoe on the Elura 100, so that may be a deal breaker for you.
     
  8. hogmog macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Thames Valley, UK
    #8
    I have the MVX460 (the UK/European equivalent of the 100) and am impressed with the video quality, its ease of use, and the extra functionality over and above other camcorders in the price range. However there is a but. The MVX460 and the Elura 100 have a motor/tape transport noise problem - I have had mine replaced twice (and it still whines) and Canon refuse to accept there is a problem despite numerous postings on the web to the contrary! So have been lumbered with a machine which has a whining backing track to my video shoots. Fortunately when recording lectures I can use a radio mic so there is more of me on the tape than the motor. If I had known of the problem before hand would have a) bought from a bricks & morter store where I could have tried out before signing on the dotted line OR b) forgone some of the functionality and bought a Sony or Panasonic (used several of these and no noise problems). So, whilst it hits all the right spots in terms of quality and functionality it is fatally flawed - though it is possible to get a whineless one but it may take some hunting down.
     

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