How hard is it to defraud Amazon?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by jordieshapiro, Sep 11, 2007.

  1. jordieshapiro macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2007
    #1
    Okay so this is a little random.

    There's a deaply discounted apple product that has struck my curiosity on Amazon. The seller is new and has no feedback listed.

    Buying things that are too cheap online from unauthorized sellers is something we all know not to do BUT Amazon claims it offers 100% protection. They'll reimburse you if the product never comes, as well as if the product is not exactly what was advertised. I'm wondering, what is the process for selling on Amazon? What info do they ask of you to be assured your not going to take the money and run. Anyone?
     
  2. thegrifman macrumors regular

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    Kennesaw, GA
    #2
    Are you asking because you want to try and sell hot air? I'm sure they check out sellers fairly thoroughly....at least I would hope so.
     
  3. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    #3
    Link to the listing? Or copy and paste it? The vagueness makes it harder to judge whether its a scam.
     
  4. jordieshapiro thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 2, 2007
    #4
    I know I used a provocative title. But I swear, I am the potential buyer. I'm just concerned that I'm going to throw down $2000 and then spend weeks pleading my case to Amazon and stressing about getting it back.

    What I basically want to know is, with Amazon's buyer protection is it completely safe to make a risky purchase. And do they ask more information from a seller than just his cell number and email address?

    Hopefully, I can get some good responses by morning.
     
  5. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    #5
    I would email Amazon and verify their price protection/alert them of a potential fraudulent seller.

    What are you trying to buy, by the way?
     
  6. jordieshapiro thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 2, 2007
    #6
    If you don't mind, I'd rather keep the item anonymous until I decide whether to snatch it up or not.

    I'll give you some of my info as an offer of authenticity.

    Jordie Shapiro
    editor/videographer
    brooklyn NY
    www.jordieshapiro.com
    jordieshapiro@mac.com

    I've bought a lot but never sold a thing online, and I have no aspirations to scam anyone ever. I'm just curious about the mechanics of places like Amazon, and how they can be sure a buyer is truly safe
     
  7. jordieshapiro thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #7
    Alerting Amazon is a good idea.

    I'll come back here tomorrow. Show what the item was, and let you if anything came of it
     
  8. Maui macrumors 6502a

    Maui

    Joined:
    May 18, 2007
    #8
    The answer to your original question is "it depends." It depends on a lot of things, including what type of seller you are talking about -- merchant with an Amazon e-commerce website vs. someone who clicked "sell yours", etc.

    Amazon has a lot of information online about your question, including a good description of their guarantee policy. Start here.

    And, as with anything online, buyer beware.
     
  9. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    #9
    Sounds good. Don't worry dude, I'm not looking to buy it, just curious. Some things (like .Mac for example) may show up dirt cheap sometimes. That's the only reason I asked, because then we could have clarified this if it was something along those lines.
     
  10. aaronw1986 macrumors 68030

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    Oct 31, 2006
    #10
    If you're concerned...why take a chance?
     
  11. jordieshapiro thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 2, 2007
    #11
    The seller is not associated with any retail outlet. It's just a dude. In Alabama. With a couple of cheap, random production items.
     
  12. jordieshapiro thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 2, 2007
    #12
    I am concern, and yet I still want to take a chance.

    This is where it gets interesting. We all can identify the kind of "too good to be true" online deals, and we all know to steer clear of them. But as sites like Amazon start taking the responsibility on themselves to make sure their sellers are legit, maybe its time we adjust our notion of online safety.

    Amazon claims to have my back if I want to do something stupid. So maybe its worth the risk.
     
  13. killerrobot macrumors 68020

    killerrobot

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    #13
    IMO, as others have said, call amazon and double check that the purchase would be covered and that he is a valid seller, etc.

    But, if you're willing to take the risk, be willing to accept the consequences good or bad.
     
  14. taytho macrumors 6502

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    Location:
    KC, MO
    #14
    i would say that if you have the money to possibly do without for a bit.... go for it. The buyers always get the hose on these deals. You would probably get your money back but no guarantees on speed
     
  15. jackc macrumors 65816

    jackc

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    #15
    You're probably asking for a bureaucratic nightmare. They're not just going to hand over $2000 once you send them an email.
     
  16. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

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    #16
    I think you've answered your own question. ;)
     
  17. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    #17
    Congratulations - you are exactly the type of buyer who the scammers love to feed on.
    I'm going to seriously question that assumption.
    Read the fine print, qualifications and exclusions before assuming it is the case. Is this seller authorized or verified or whatever qualified for protection to be offered? Does this sale meet all criteria for protection? (One is thatyou must pay through Amazon Payments, no other way) Even so, all the seller has to do is ship you an empty box with a signature on delivery, and sure, you have a "Materially Different" claim, but you could be fighting it until you're old and grey.
     
  18. jackc macrumors 65816

    jackc

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    #18
    Also keep in mind that people post things under the wrong item, either deliberately or accidentally. A lot of times I've looked for a used text book, and the low price will be for the study guide or a different version, listed under the other listing. This allows them to have the low price, sometimes they'll explain in the description, sometimes they don't and you've got to figure if the price is too good to be true it's probably the wrong one.
     
  19. kellen macrumors 68020

    kellen

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    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #19
    I don't see the real risk here. Pay with a credit card, you will be covered. I ordered a mac mini from amazon through macmall for 150. Well it ended up being an iPod nano. I called amazon and they said that if I didn't get it as advertised, then I would be would be covered by their a to z program. Couple that with my credit card being able to do a charge back if it wasnt as advertised, I think there is not that much to worry about.

    Good luck!
     
  20. jonnylink macrumors 6502

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    Jul 15, 2007
    #20
    Make up your mind so you can let us know what this dang mystery product is!!! :)
     
  21. GavinTing macrumors 6502

    GavinTing

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    Singapore!
    #21
    Make sure it is the exact version though...

    You really shouldn't be so secretive.. It's like asking if a particular Made-In-China food is alright to eat, but not say which one :rolleyes:
     
  22. jordieshapiro thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Sep 2, 2007
    #22
    So a lackluster conclusion,

    The product was a Canon HDV camcorder, being sold for 2500, (about a G below market).

    I ended up talking to the seller on the phone, after a couple of email corispondings. He seemed like a nice guy BUT um,

    In 2 different emails he listed two different last names. No combination of which I was able to find through yellow pages or google. Same with the production companies he said he worked for. The one that did exist never heard of him. The one thing about him, I did believe was that his first name was Kareem.

    And even after all this I'm thinking, well this guy seems really sketchy, but that doesn't mean he doesn't have the camera. Maybe this was a simple case of his posse having held up a truck.

    As I was getting more and more weirded out, I never stopped being polite. I accepted his explanation of one of the last names he gave me was his middle name. He answered right on the beat. Maybe in the end, I asked too many questions. I tried to get him to do the deal through a site called www.escrow.com where he doesn't get paid until I inspect the item. He has stopped returning my phone calls.

    Oh well. The good news is, I still love cheap **** and I go on record as having learned nothing from this experience.
     
  23. GavinTing macrumors 6502

    GavinTing

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    Location:
    Singapore!
    #23
    Excellent. May you loose 2500 before learning something ;)


    And since when did Apple make Canon HDV camcorders?

     
  24. jonnylink macrumors 6502

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    Jul 15, 2007
    #24
    In the end learning nothing is all that counts :D
     
  25. Maui macrumors 6502a

    Maui

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    #25
    Glad we all took our time to answer your question then. I'll have to remember your username next time you ask for help. :D
     

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