How is the screen with lots of sunlight?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by kat.hayes, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. kat.hayes macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    #1
    I'm thinking of getting a new iMac and placing it on a desk that will have windows behind me and to the left. How does the screen of the new iMac look when there is lots of natural light hitting it? Is this a bad idea?

    Thanks.
     
  2. mpantone, Dec 12, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2013

    mpantone macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    #2
    Not a stellar idea, regardless of the computer brand (Apple or someone else). Too much strain on the eyes.

    A lot of ergonomic work guidelines are based on creating the best environment first, before worrying about specific corrective equipment or workarounds. For example, if a workplace is very noisy, the top priority would be to find a way to eliminate the noise source before finding earplugs.

    Negative factors in workplace ergonomics typically span multiple activities, not just one discrete task like computing. A pair of earplugs might help alleviate the noise while you're reading and writing, but they aren't helpful while you are talking on the phone, having a conversation in the office with a colleague, or videoconferencing with your computer.

    That's why it's important to create a pleasant baseline working environment from the start.

    That said, there is antiglare film that can be applied to computer monitor screens to alleviate the worst glare should you not have the option of repositioning the monitor for better viewing. Some of these antiglare films are precut for your specific computer model. Other film kits require the user to trim the sheet with a utility knife before application. Note that even a good antiglare covering would not alleviate excessive backlight in a video conference with a screen-mounted webcam.

    Of course, antiglare film on your monitor screen or earplugs will only help you. They won't help the person working next to you (should you be in a multi-person facility). If you're alone in a home office, do whatever you want, you don't really need to think about anyone else (until you have visitors).

    The better option would be to find some window coverings (shades, drapes, blinds, etc.) to manage light penetration. Since these are usually adjustable, they can be altered over the course of a day to compensate for varying light conditions that are a natural part of the earth's rotation. The downside is that they need to periodically adjusted due to the prevailing conditions.

    Anyhow, good luck.
     
  3. kat.hayes thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011

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