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How long do SSD's last?

jwolf6589

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Had a 500GB SSD installed in my Mac yesterday and its now lightning fast! MS Office apps open in seconds instead of a minute. Installing updates, rebooting, and such is now super fast! How long will this SSD last? Spinners can last awhile or they can die in 3-5 years it depends. I hope SSD's last allot longer.
 
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vertical smile

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It depends on how much they are used, but your SSD will probably outlast the computer.

When going from a HDD to a SSD, you should enable TRIM support if you have not already, it is pretty easy to do, just look it up online on how to do it.

Also, if your SSD ever does do bad, either from being defective or from excessive use, they usually just stop working completely, like they won't mount at all. HDDs usually have warning signs long before they completely go black, SSD won't have any warnings.
 
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jwolf6589

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It depends on how much they are used, but your SSD will probably outlast the computer.

When going from a HDD to a SSD, you should enable TRIM support if you have not already, it is pretty easy to do, just look it up online on how to do it.

Also, if your SSD ever does do bad, either from being defective or from excessive use, they usually just stop working completely, like they won't mount at all. HDDs usually have warning signs long before they completely go black, SSD won't have any warnings.

TRIM Support: Yes

He did enable this. Not sure how it was done, but I believe it was done from Terminal. Can you explain? Thanks..
 
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vertical smile

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TRIM Support: Yes

He did enable this. Not sure how it was done, but I believe it was done from Terminal. Can you explain? Thanks..
Depending on the OS, it can be enabled via Terminal. I am pretty sure that Mojave TRIM can be enabled via Terminal, but I have not used it yet.

TRIM is a command that will inform the SSD know which which blocks of data that are no longer used and wipes it. It makes things faster and extends the use of the SSD.
 
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jwolf6589

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Depending on the OS, it can be enabled via Terminal. I am pretty sure that Mojave TRIM can be enabled via Terminal, but I have not used it yet.

TRIM is a command that will inform the SSD know which which blocks of data that are no longer used and wipes it. It makes things faster and extends the use of the SSD.

Strange why Apple does not do this by default.
 
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goslowjoe

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Mmm, an SSD could last years, or die in the blink of an eye. I lost a 500GB Crucial SSD in a Mac Mini last year with absolutely no prior warning. Yet in three other devices, two Macs and one Windows PC, similar Crucial SSDs are running flawlessly.

I am still miffed about the loss of the SSD that was not even six months old. The process to return the unit to the supplier was such a schlep that I just wrote it off. Thankfully Time Machine was my rescue and no information was lost.
 
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vertical smile

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Why does a SSD need this and a HDD does not?
They are different technologies. The way data is stored on an SSD is totally different than HDD, the HDD would not benefit from TRIM at all.

Mmm, an SSD could last years, or die in the blink of an eye. I lost a 500GB Crucial SSD in a Mac Mini last year with absolutely no prior warning. Yet in three other devices, two Macs and one Windows PC, similar Crucial SSDs are running flawlessly.

I am still miffed about the loss of the SSD that was not even six months old. The process to return the unit to the supplier was such a schlep that I just wrote it off. Thankfully Time Machine was my rescue and no information was lost.
SSDs do go bad, just probably not the rate of HDDs.

In a way, I think it is worse when SSDs go bad due to not having any warning at all, so backing up is really important for SSDs.

With many newer Macs having non-removable storage, I wonder if failing SSDs will end up being the cause of trashing many Macs in the future.
 
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Fishrrman

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I told you to do this more than a year ago (or it seems), jwolf.

Do you understand now why I was recommending it?
 
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jwolf6589

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I told you to do this more than a year ago (or it seems), jwolf.

Do you understand now why I was recommending it?

I do know. Boy is my Mac much faster! My goodness. Even Office apps open up super fast! Boot up is in seconds etc..
 
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timidpimpin

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The larger the SSD = the longer it will live.

About two years ago I bought a Samsung EVO 850 250GB, and think it's one of the best hardware purchases I have ever made. I just wish I would have gotten a 500GB.

Also, keep the SSD as empty as possible. This is proven to make them both perform better and last longer.
 
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treekram

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Re: TRIM
The NAND chips used in SSD's require that a previously written block be erased before new data is written on it. TRIM facilitates the erasing of blocks on the NAND once data is deleted, thus the next time data is written, only a write has to be done, not an erase and write. For HDD's, data is just written, it doesn't have to be erased before the write.

NAND chips have finite useful lives based on how many erase/write cycles they can go through. Obviously, you can have premature failure of the NAND chip or the other components on the SSD. The current high-end TLC NAND chips (the most commonly used type of NAND chip) have absurdly high endurance rates. The newer-technology QLC NAND chips don't have the same level of endurance, but it's higher than what a lot of SSD's had just a few years ago. The average life of the better TLC SSD's from the better SSD companies bought today will likely be technologically obsolescent before it fails.
 
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vertical smile

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My Mac is now as fast as my new PC at work with Win 10.
I do know. Boy is my Mac much faster! My goodness. Even Office apps open up super fast! Boot up is in seconds etc..

SSDs can bring new life to old Macs.

Years back, I think 2010, I bought my parents a used Mid 2007 iMac. It was perfect for them, as my Mac Mini G4 they were using was showing its age at the time. They used it for many years, but my father was complaining about it starting to be slow, slow boots, websites not working.

Maybe like 2 years ago, he got tired of dealing with the slow iMac, and he asked me for recommendations for a new Mac. I told him that I would upgrade to a SSD to see if he can get a few more years out of the 2007 iMac before spending money on something else.

Last year, I replaced the HDD with a SSD and upgraded the OS to El Capitan, and it was like a new machine to my father. He has said on many occasions how much faster the iMac is now.

Unless you have a need for a large amount of storage, I would always recommend a SSD over a HDD, especially as a boot drive.


Why does a SSD need this and a HDD does not?

Re: TRIM
The NAND chips used in SSD's require that a previously written block be erased before new data is written on it. TRIM facilitates the erasing of blocks on the NAND once data is deleted, thus the next time data is written, only a write has to be done, not an erase and write. For HDD's, data is just written, it doesn't have to be erased before the write.

NAND chips have finite useful lives based on how many erase/write cycles they can go through. Obviously, you can have premature failure of the NAND chip or the other components on the SSD. The current high-end TLC NAND chips (the most commonly used type of NAND chip) have absurdly high endurance rates. The newer-technology QLC NAND chips don't have the same level of endurance, but it's higher than what a lot of SSD's had just a few years ago. The average life of the better TLC SSD's from the better SSD companies bought today will likely be technologically obsolescent before it fails.

This answer is better than what I could have said.
 
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BigMcGuire

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Really should read this. I spent a few days reading everything I could on SSD lifespan and endurance. They'll last longer than most people will ever use them for. And the drives used in this study were 240GB.

I was given 2 80GB Intel SSDs that were used as an OS and gaming drive for many many years by a friend. I then used them for an OS and gaming drive for ... many many years. They have over 8 years of use and still show 96% life left, both of them.

Now, of course, they're unused because I have 500GB Samsung EVO 850 ssds that I got for free from someone else that didn't want them (99% life left). Work lets me play with 1TB Samsung Pro 850 disks. :D

Highly recommend DriveDx.
 
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BigBoy2018

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They are different technologies. The way data is stored on an SSD is totally different than HDD, the HDD would not benefit from TRIM at all.


SSDs do go bad, just probably not the rate of HDDs.

In a way, I think it is worse when SSDs go bad due to not having any warning at all, so backing up is really important for SSDs.

With many newer Macs having non-removable storage, I wonder if failing SSDs will end up being the cause of trashing many Macs in the future.

This. Its my biggest issue with current Macs being released. Up until the 2016 macbook pros, the ssd was replaceable. Now all macs come with a non replacable/removablessd. I think thats a horrible move by Apple.
 
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timidpimpin

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Speaking of TRIM... it often won't be auto-enabled on non-Apple SSD's. Like my Samsung EVO 850.

These terminal commands will enable/disable it.

To enable:

sudo trimforce enable

To disable:

sudo trimforce disable

TRIM is a helpful tool, and improves performance a tad when writing on previously written areas, but it certainly isn't a must. I know guys that have been using SSD's for years and never use TRIM.
 
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827538

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Why does a SSD need this and a HDD does not?

Because a HDD can simply write over old data.
An SSD must wipe the old data before writing to those same cells. So TRIM deletes the old data to keep your SSD running optimally.

As for how long they last, it depends on usage/cell type (SLC/MLC/TLC/QLC)/controller/heat etc etc.
But generally they last a long time and are more reliable than HDD's, especially in mobile devices as they are basically immune to shock and vibration.

I've been using SSD's for some time now and I've yet to have one go bad. I've had numerous HDD's fail for me over the years. Just use it and enjoy it, in all likely-hood it will far outlast your PC.
 
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jwolf6589

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Because a HDD can simply write over old data.
An SSD must wipe the old data before writing to those same cells. So TRIM deletes the old data to keep your SSD running optimally.

As for how long they last, it depends on usage/cell type (SLC/MLC/TLC/QLC)/controller/heat etc etc.
But generally they last a long time and are more reliable than HDD's, especially in mobile devices as they are basically immune to shock and vibration.

I've been using SSD's for some time now and I've yet to have one go bad. I've had numerous HDD's fail for me over the years. Just use it and enjoy it, in all likely-hood it will far outlast your PC.

By the way I am using a Mac not a PC.
 
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harriska2

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Mar 16, 2011
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My PC has an SSD from 2011 and it is almost full (thanks iTunes backup) and only 250gb. It is still alive, I don't know why. I replaced a spinner with this SSD and it was like a completely new machine. Our 2013 iMac just got a new 1tb SSD the other day and I noticed all the beach balling has gone away. Almost like a new computer. $#%&#$% Fusion drive.
 
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timidpimpin

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By the way I am using a Mac not a PC.

To be fair... a Mac is as much a PC as a Windows machine. When the term "personal computer" was first made it meant a computer that could fit on a small table for personal use. This is compared to the ones that took up whole rooms at the time.

The term has been morphed by many into meaning a Windows machine. The proper terms to differentiate them are Mac and Wintel, and both are PC's.
 
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Apple_Robert

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Sep 21, 2012
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In the middle of several books.
When you do system updates, you may have to enable TRIM support again. If you don't want to mess around in terminal when needed, there is a app called "Trim Enabler" ($14.99) that will monitor the health of your SSD, enable TRIM for you, and also inform you when it needs to enabled again, and turn it back on for you. It is a very good app and the developer is a member here. I used it on my late 2011 MBP (when I had it) and I am also using it on my late 2014 Mac mini.
 
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