how long does a full charge take

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by lakaiordie, Jul 13, 2008.

  1. lakaiordie macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2008
    #1
    i guess im doing what you call a calibration, charging the phone from dead to a real full charge. i think its only been about 2hrs. but its showing the plug in the battery and not the lightning bolt. but is it doing a trickle charge now?

    how long should a full charge take? i think i might leave it plugged in while i go to sleep and unplug it in the morning before i go to work around 7am. im sure that wont harm it, right?
     
  2. lakaiordie thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2008
  3. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #3
    I am testing it right now.
    I should be able to tell you by morning how long it takes an iPhone 3g to charge from 0 battery life.

    (Unless somebody else has an idea)
     
  4. NiroshanMan macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    #4
    It took me roughly 2.5 hours to charge from fully dead all the way.
     
  5. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #5
    First thing to note- The iPhone 3g wont turn on until it reaches ~5-10% battery life. So it's better to use an external battery pack before the phone dies- which is what I did.
     
  6. alexboy45 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    #6

    this should help

    http://www.apple.com/batteries

    Standard Charging
    Most lithium-ion batteries use a fast charge to charge your device to 80% battery capacity, then switch to trickle charging. That’s about two hours of charge time to power an iPod to 80% capacity, then another two hours to fully charge it, if you are not using the iPod while charging. You can charge all lithium-ion batteries a large but finite number of times, as defined by charge cycle.

    A charge cycle means using all of the battery’s power, but that doesn’t necessarily mean a single charge. For instance, you could listen to your iPod for a few hours one day, using half its power, and then recharge it fully. If you did the same thing the next day, it would count as one charge cycle, not two, so you may take several days to complete a cycle. Each time you complete a charge cycle, it diminishes battery capacity slightly, but you can put notebook, iPod, and iPhone batteries through many charge cycles before they will only hold 80% of original battery capacity. As with other rechargeable batteries, you may eventually need to replace your battery
     

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