How Magic Keyboard w Numeric Keypad compared w Das's, Corsair's & Logitech Craft? Your'sFlex or not?

Does your Magic Keyboard with Numeric Keypad bend over time?

  • Yes after 1 month of use

    Votes: 1 10.0%
  • Yes after 2-4 months of use

    Votes: 2 20.0%
  • Yes after 4-6 months of use

    Votes: 2 20.0%
  • Yes after 6-8 months of use

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes after 8-10 months of use

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes after more than 10 months of use

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No even after using it for 4 monhts

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No even after using it for 6 months

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No even after using it for 8 months

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No even after using it for a year

    Votes: 5 50.0%

  • Total voters
    10

hajime

macrumors 603
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,065
835
Hello, I have not looked for a keyboard for four years. The last time I checked here was that Apple did not want to make a wireless keyboard with numeric keypad.

I just went to Apple website and saw this keyboard. Is it wireless? How is the comfort level? Do the keys feel like those pre-MBP 2016 ones or 207-2018 butterfly ones?

Does it also work well in Windows and Linux?
 

sergioarista

macrumors member
Jul 7, 2010
49
13
Hello, I have not looked for a keyboard for four years. The last time I checked here was that Apple did not want to make a wireless keyboard with numeric keypad.

I just went to Apple website and saw this keyboard. Is it wireless? How is the comfort level? Do the keys feel like those pre-MBP 2016 ones or 207-2018 butterfly ones?

Does it also work well in Windows and Linux?
I Have always found apple keyboards comfortable to use, this one is no exception, however I find it too large to use with the Magic Trackpad as it sits too far to the right, I personally prefer the one without numeric keypad.

They keys are halfway between the pre 2016 and the current ones, and yes, they work well with windows/Linux
 

hajime

macrumors 603
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,065
835
Thanks. How is the comfort level compared with that of the Magic Keyboard? In the specs, it states that it has "scissor mechanism beneath each key..."
 

wlossw

macrumors 65816
May 9, 2012
1,064
953
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
I switched from the old wired Apple Keyboard with numeric keypad to the magic version with numeric keypad about 6 months ago. It’s a great keyboard. Much more travel than the laptop version. Still nice and firm. Some people find the keyboard flexes too much for them. It’s also very pricey.

All told I love it.
 
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hajime

macrumors 603
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,065
835
Thanks. I am considering this keyboard along with:

Corsair K63 Wireless Mechanical Gaming Keyboard (I don't play games but I like wireless keyboard and possibly Cherry keys.)

Logitech Craft Advanced Wireless Keyboard with Creative Input Dial

Das Keyboard 4 Professional Soft Tactile MX Brown Mechanical Keyboard (only wired version is available)

Anybody tried these to make a comparison?
 

mdbradigan

macrumors regular
Oct 28, 2014
122
224
Nashville, TN area
Thanks. I am considering this keyboard along with:

Corsair K63 Wireless Mechanical Gaming Keyboard (I don't play games but I like wireless keyboard and possibly Cherry keys.)

Logitech Craft Advanced Wireless Keyboard with Creative Input Dial

Das Keyboard 4 Professional Soft Tactile MX Brown Mechanical Keyboard (only wired version is available)

Anybody tried these to make a comparison?
Keyboards are astoundingly subjective, so hard to say what is "better" - people have vastly disparate viewpoints on this. (see any recent MBP post).

I have a CM Storm quickfire with cherry mx browns, and own the Magic Keyboard. I like them both, but VASTLY prefer the former, simply because I like mechanical switches. The Magic is great, I don't dislike it all, and I have used it to write and program for months at a time.

If I had to get any of those on your list then I, personally, would get the Das Keyboard 98 times out of 100, if that helps at all.
 

Regime2008

Suspended
Oct 3, 2017
720
798
Basshead in ATL
Thanks. I am considering this keyboard along with:

Corsair K63 Wireless Mechanical Gaming Keyboard (I don't play games but I like wireless keyboard and possibly Cherry keys.)

Logitech Craft Advanced Wireless Keyboard with Creative Input Dial

Das Keyboard 4 Professional Soft Tactile MX Brown Mechanical Keyboard (only wired version is available)

Anybody tried these to make a comparison?
Apple mouse and keyboard is horrible compared to those listed. If you want speed and accuracy, go with one of the mechanicals that you listed.
 

hajime

macrumors 603
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,065
835
Keyboards are astoundingly subjective, so hard to say what is "better" - people have vastly disparate viewpoints on this. (see any recent MBP post).

I have a CM Storm quickfire with cherry mx browns, and own the Magic Keyboard. I like them both, but VASTLY prefer the former, simply because I like mechanical switches. The Magic is great, I don't dislike it all, and I have used it to write and program for months at a time.

If I had to get any of those on your list then I, personally, would get the Das Keyboard 98 times out of 100, if that helps at all.
It seems that Das users like their keyboard very much. What so special about this keyboard? I cannot find Corsair's wireless keyboard on display but I don't like other Corsair's keyboards on display. The keys wobble too much and I don't especially like the space bar.

I do prefer to have a white, silver or pink keyboard though.
 

slythfox

macrumors newbie
Oct 17, 2017
3
0
Does it also work well in Windows and Linux?
I have the magic keyboard (no numeric keypad) and magic trackpad 2. I like the chiclet keyboard feel and I think the trackpad is nice under macOS.

So far as I can tell the keyboard works in Windows and Linux only when wired and the function keys don't work as you would expect (e.g. volume control). If you're looking to pair the keyboard with the trackpad know that I was unable to get the trackpad to the behave well in either Windows 10 or Linux (e.g. vanilla Fedora). (Expect no scrolling, right/context click, multi-touch, and 3d touch.)

Some 3rd party keyboards offer dual OS modes such as for switching command/control location or changing how the function keys work. I had originally decided that I could live with a wired keyboard and had chosen the CODE keyboard for this reason but it was DOA. Overall, I can live with the keyboard since I am mostly in macOS these days and I like it's small size. That trackpad though...
 
Last edited:

mdbradigan

macrumors regular
Oct 28, 2014
122
224
Nashville, TN area
It seems that Das users like their keyboard very much. What so special about this keyboard? I cannot find Corsair's wireless keyboard on display but I don't like other Corsair's keyboards on display. The keys wobble too much and I don't especially like the space bar.

I do prefer to have a white, silver or pink keyboard though.
For me, personally, the only thing I really care about is the tactile feedback. Das' keyboard are phenomenal in this regard. Lovely cherry switches, excellent metal frame, just pure quality.

I suggest, if going mechanical, go wired. If you want a wireless keyboard, go with Apple Magic Keyboard or perhaps something like Logi's K750. These are fairly inexpensive, and work pretty well. I've used them both, and gone through 2 Logis, and one Magic - the keys gave out or the battery did.

As someone who types a massive amount all day every day, I'll never go back to either one of them. They're not "junk", necessarily. But they aren't going to last as long, feel as good, or be as pleasant to use as a real, wired, mechanical keyboard.

As with all things, ymmv.
 
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vkd

macrumors 6502a
Sep 10, 2012
915
313
I think I must be a light typer or something. Whichever way up, I find it amusing that another person who types all day every day a massive amount of text and in their case they are burning through loads of keyboards, keys giving out, batteries dying, whilst here I am in exactly the same scenario with the same Magic keyboard for 10 years or so and it is still as good as new.
 

hajime

macrumors 603
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,065
835
For home use, does the Apple Magic Keyboard with Numeric keypad flexes as complainted by some users?
 

pasadena

macrumors 6502a
Sep 12, 2012
812
173
Seattle, WA
I have the magic keyboard (no numeric keypad) and magic trackpad 2. I like the chiclet keyboard feel and I think the trackpad is nice under macOS.

So far as I can tell the keyboard works in Windows and Linux only when wired and the function keys don't work as you would expect (e.g. volume control). If you're looking to pair the keyboard with the trackpad know that I was unable to get the trackpad to the behave well in either Windows 10 or Linux (e.g. vanilla Fedora). (Expect no scrolling, right/context click, multi-touch, and 3d touch.)
I just got a magic keyboard with numeric pad a couple of days ago with my new iMac. I use Win 10 in bootcamp and just managed to get the keyboard to work without the cable. Up until now, it showed as paired in the bluetooth settings but never connected and never worked. I reinstalled the bootcamp drivers a couple of times, went back to the bluetooth settings, removed a duplicate keyboard that showed in there, turned the keyboard on and off, waited a minute and boom, connected. I'm typing this on it, without cable.

Still can't get the special functions on the Fn keys to work, though. Yet.
 

monokakata

macrumors 68000
May 8, 2008
1,901
417
Ithaca, NY
For home use, does the Apple Magic Keyboard with Numeric keypad flexes as complainted by some users?
Mine does, although it's not something you feel as you're typing. Instead, over time, it begins to bend down at the center.

I couldn't get any satisfaction from Apple (they said it was my fault) so I just put it on my thigh and bent it back into shape. Then I put some athletic tape on the bottom in the center, and I thought that had fixed it. But no. I've had to bend it back two more times.

Everything else about the keyboard I like, very much.
 

monokakata

macrumors 68000
May 8, 2008
1,901
417
Ithaca, NY
So, it flexes even under normal home use?
I wouldn't use the term "flex."

Here's all I can say: I'm a writer and a book designer and I'm at my keyboard many hours every day, typing, and not with a hammer.

Over time, the damn thing bends down at the center of the QWERTY section. I know when this has happened, because the thin pads then will not catch (because the center is in contact with my desk) and the KB slides around. Then I bend it back.

I'm far from the only one who's experienced that -- do a forum seach here.
 
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hajime

macrumors 603
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,065
835
I wouldn't use the term "flex."

Here's all I can say: I'm a writer and a book designer and I'm at my keyboard many hours every day, typing, and not with a hammer.

Over time, the damn thing bends down at the center of the QWERTY section. I know when this has happened, because the thin pads then will not catch (because the center is in contact with my desk) and the KB slides around. Then I bend it back.

I'm far from the only one who's experienced that -- do a forum seach here.

Typical of Apple these days. Intentionally selling things that can break easily and with some old technologies. Then, makes us chase and buy the next version.

When I owned the Apple II, I could walk in an Apple dealer (typically no other customer) and got undivided attention from the sales. Last week, I waited for over 15 minutes and got ignored by those sales because they were busy serving customers of iOS devices. Only one Apple sales was in the computer section serving non-technical rich customer from the East who bought iPhone, iPad and MBP at the same time. Ridiculous.
 
Last edited:
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TheIntruder

macrumors 65816
Jul 2, 2008
1,234
765
I wouldn't use the term "flex."

Here's all I can say: I'm a writer and a book designer and I'm at my keyboard many hours every day, typing, and not with a hammer.

Over time, the damn thing bends down at the center of the QWERTY section. I know when this has happened, because the thin pads then will not catch (because the center is in contact with my desk) and the KB slides around. Then I bend it back.

I'm far from the only one who's experienced that -- do a forum seach here.
The sad thing is, Apple knows how to make a good keyboard.

The old Extended I and II were built like tanks, and could be taken apart and cleaned. Solid steel backbone and mechanical switches. I could pull out the one I bought with my SE, and it would still work great, if I had an ADB-to-USB adapter. I picked up a II at a thrift store as a backup, and it would as well.

They later made a cheaper AppleDesign keyboard that was decent, even if it used rubber dome tactile switches.

Then came the translucent era and Apple completely lost the plot. Those keyboards had a mushy action that got worse with age; the action would get sticky, and key strikes wouldn't consistently register. They were followed by the clear-casing keyboards that could not be disassembled, and proudly displayed every bit of detritus they collected between the key caps.

Salvation finally came in the form of the Wired Aluminum Keyboard that debuted with the Al iMacs. The key action is pretty good, it has a heft (Apple boasted they were made via the cuttings from iMac casings), and durable. I'm typing this on a 10-year old example.

It had a good run, but Apple shunted it to the EDU market/service part in favor of the Magic Keyboard. Compare the two side by side and it's clear they aren't built to the same standard. The aluminum in the MK is but a thin veneer and doesn't stand up to rigors of usage.

When I pick up a new Mac later this year, it looks like I'll have to look elsewhere, again, for a good keyboard.
 
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theluggage

macrumors 601
Jul 29, 2011
4,702
3,564
Hello, I have not looked for a keyboard for four years. The last time I checked here was that Apple did not want to make a wireless keyboard with numeric keypad.

I just went to Apple website and saw this keyboard. Is it wireless? How is the comfort level? Do the keys feel like those pre-MBP 2016 ones or 207-2018 butterfly ones?

Does it also work well in Windows and Linux?
Not sure that anybody has answered all these questions:

- Yes, its wireless (bluetooth) rechargeable via a (supplied) USB-A to Lightning cable. If you want wireless because you're running out of USB sockets, you might want a USB charger... but it goes for weeks on a full charge and you can use it while its charging (Magic mouse designers, take note...)
- Keys are technically still "scissor" mechanisms - they have considerably more travel than the new MBP "butterfly" keys, but noticably less travel (and a slightly 'harder' feel)
- Comfort level is subjective - I prefer the key feel and slightly steeper slope of the previous wired keyboard/w/keypad.
- Windows: obviously, the difference between ctrl/alt/windows keys, but Parallels, Boot Camp, Synergy etc. have options to help with this.
- Linux: I've found that Apple-layout keyboards are a royal pain with the newer Linux distros (Ubuntu etc.) that have dumbed down some of the user-friendly keyboard options and assign all sorts of shortcuts and "macro" ket functions to the GUI. There are well-documented tweaks to get going in command-line mode, but I've never been able to get things working perfectly in GUI mode.

NB: The latter has nothing to do with the Magic keyboard - its an Apple layout thing, especially here in the UK where the Apple "British" layout has a load of annoying differences in the placement of punctuation keys c.f. the British PC layout. Getting a '#' in Linux was fun because (on an Apple UK keyboard) it needs the "option" key...

Frustratingly, this keyboard was the absolute best that I've found at inter-working with multiple operating systems, with switchable keyboard layouts:

https://www.logitech.com/en-gb/product/k375s-multidevice-keyboard?crid=27

...but I found the feel really inferior to the Apple keyboards (to be fair, its a relatively cheap keyboard). I don't know if the "Craft" has inherited its features.
 

hajime

macrumors 603
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,065
835
I think the base of the magic keyboard with numeric keypad is flat. How can it bend over time?

I wonder if those sold in 2018 still have this issue. Is the space gray issue free?
 
Last edited:

ignatius345

macrumors 68030
Aug 20, 2015
2,856
3,829
Thanks. I am considering this keyboard along with:

Corsair K63 Wireless Mechanical Gaming Keyboard (I don't play games but I like wireless keyboard and possibly Cherry keys.)

Logitech Craft Advanced Wireless Keyboard with Creative Input Dial

Das Keyboard 4 Professional Soft Tactile MX Brown Mechanical Keyboard (only wired version is available)

Anybody tried these to make a comparison?
The Corsair and the Das are mechanical keyboards and will have way more key travel than the Apple. Not sure about the Logitech, but I'd guess it's closer to the Apple. I have a Cherry brown keyboard (a KUL). It's a pretty light switch, not too loud and has a nice tactile feel. I personally moved on to the Happy Hacking Pro Keyboard which I've been using for about 3 years and absolutely love.

If you really want to judge keyboard feel, you have to try them out. Easy with the Apple one, harder with the mechanical ones, but maybe you can find a place that has them on display.
 
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hajime

macrumors 603
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
6,065
835
You are right. The only way to find out is to try all of them for about a week.
 
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