How much longer do I have

JLH81

macrumors member
Original poster
May 10, 2016
68
6
I have an early 2015 MB Pro. Ideally, how much longer do I have with this machine (performance wise, upgrades, etc.)? Currently, it seems quick enough for me, but I know it's starting to age. I would love some thoughts/opinions. Thanks! My specs are as follows:

Model Name: MacBook Pro

Model Identifier: MacBookPro12,1

Processor Name: Intel Core i5

Processor Speed: 2.7 GHz

Number of Processors: 1

Total Number of Cores: 2

L2 Cache (per Core): 256 KB

L3 Cache: 3 MB

Memory: 8 GB

Boot ROM Version: 180.0.0.0.0

SMC Version (system): 2.28f7
 

d0nK

macrumors 6502
Nov 4, 2011
390
171
UK
What do you use it for? Video, audio work? Just social media?

I still use my late 2011 i7 15" mbp for heavy audio work and it's blazing. I did put in 16GB of RAM, a 512GB SSD boot/application drive and 1TB spinner data drive though. <- Because that was when Apple let you upgrade it yourself!

I do know that the 2015 model is still desirable for a lot of professionals, because of all the ports it uses, that Apple removed in the 2016 model.
 

JLH81

macrumors member
Original poster
May 10, 2016
68
6
I use it for work, social media, and Microsoft Office. I am guessing a couple of more years? How out of date are my specs?
 

d0nK

macrumors 6502
Nov 4, 2011
390
171
UK
I use it for work, social media, and Microsoft Office. I am guessing a couple of more years? How out of date are my specs?
Looking at your usage, as long as you have an SSD in there you should be good and fast for another 10 years, lol.

SSD is key really. But you didn't post your hard drive spec.
 

JLH81

macrumors member
Original poster
May 10, 2016
68
6
Looking at your usage, as long as you have an SSD in there you should be good and fast for another 10 years, lol.

SSD is key really. But you didn't post your hard drive spec.
I have a 256 SSD
[doublepost=1548898973][/doublepost]How long will I be able to get the yearly OS updates though?
 

d0nK

macrumors 6502
Nov 4, 2011
390
171
UK
How long will I be able to get the yearly OS updates though?
Isn't the 2015 still compatible fully with the latest OS?
You'd have to predict the future to know what Apple will change next.

I still use El Capitan because the latest OS's aren't fully compatible with my older machine (Metal support).
El Capitan is solid and reliable for my audio work and I still get updates (security, iTunes, Safari, etc) so I'm happy.
 
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JLH81

macrumors member
Original poster
May 10, 2016
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I have no clue if it's still fully compatible? I have thought about upgrading to a newer machine and selling this one. However, with the keyboard issues and what not, it is probably smarter to just hang onto this one.
 

PROFESS0R

macrumors 6502
Jul 30, 2017
256
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My 2007 MBP is still going strong. I replaced it because I do advanced regression modeling and it was getting a bit long in the tooth for that. This said, it still works wonderfully for Microsoft office and web surfing.

Try not to buy in to the artificial demand apple tries to create by releasing new versions of OSX. In my opinion, very few of the release changes in OSX are must have features.

I would recommend you keep what you have until it breaks, or until YOU identify a need that it does not satisfy.

Joe
 

d0nK

macrumors 6502
Nov 4, 2011
390
171
UK
I have no clue if it's still fully compatible? I have thought about upgrading to a newer machine and selling this one. However, with the keyboard issues and what not, it is probably smarter to just hang onto this one.
That's what I'm doing. I'm waiting for Apple to make the keyboard reliable before I upgrade, then I'm getting it. Hopefully in the 2019 model. But I have a 2011 model whose 6750m gfx chip failed (replacing the chip this week and will sell when 2019 mbp comes out) and I do heavy audio work with it so I kinda need an upgrade.
 

JLH81

macrumors member
Original poster
May 10, 2016
68
6
Thanks, guys! We have a 2010 that is still running strong as well. However, the spinner HD in it really needs to be swapped out for a SSD. I will have to do that in the near future.
 

d0nK

macrumors 6502
Nov 4, 2011
390
171
UK
Thanks, guys! We have a 2010 that is still running strong as well. However, the spinner HD in it really needs to be swapped out for a SSD. I will have to do that in the near future.
The really great thing about the older mbp's is that you CAN stick an SSD in there :)
 
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kohlson

macrumors 68020
Apr 23, 2010
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Model Identifier: MacBookPro12,1
I have the model just before this. Late-2013 15-MBP 11,3. I use it to edit HD and 4K on FCPX and Resolve. Learning After Effects, too. Running HS, and I expect to update to Mojave at next dot release. While I don't expect it to last "forever" the end is not in sight.
 
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Diazepam

Suspended
Nov 24, 2018
77
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My 2007 MBP is still going strong. I replaced it because I do advanced regression modeling and it was getting a bit long in the tooth for that. This said, it still works wonderfully for Microsoft office and web surfing.

Try not to buy in to the artificial demand apple tries to create by releasing new versions of OSX. In my opinion, very few of the release changes in OSX are must have features.

I would recommend you keep what you have until it breaks, or until YOU identify a need that it does not satisfy.

Joe
Well said ^

Yeah, I am still using my mid-2009 Macbook Pro, which works fine for watching movies, web browsing, etc. and runs Sierra. Until recently, I was using it for programming using XCode, and it even worked fine for that. I put in an SSD and upgraded RAM to 8GB. In fact, until 2 years ago, I was totally fine running Snow Leopard (i.e. 8 OS versions old at this point) for my basic usage.

Despite that, I went ahead and bought a 2018 Macbook Pro because I needed it to get make progress with my programming. And the build quality and reliability has not proved to be all that great.

Like Professor said, most new features are overhyped and made out to be a need when in fact they are just conveniences that run the risk of adding more complexity and/or bugs you don't need.

I'd keep the 2015.
 

Cashmonee

macrumors 65816
May 27, 2006
1,168
832
My 2007 MBP is still going strong. I replaced it because I do advanced regression modeling and it was getting a bit long in the tooth for that. This said, it still works wonderfully for Microsoft office and web surfing.

Try not to buy in to the artificial demand apple tries to create by releasing new versions of OSX. In my opinion, very few of the release changes in OSX are must have features.

I would recommend you keep what you have until it breaks, or until YOU identify a need that it does not satisfy.

Joe
The problem is security updates. If your 2007 is still running El Capitan, it isn't receiving security patches anymore. I personally would not use it online.

For the OP, that machine will last about as long as you want it to. You may feel the RAM being cramped at some point, but honestly outside of professional work, it seems like we have plateaued with RAM usage for a normal user. 8 GB was what my midrange 2013 came with, and honestly even though I have 16 GB on my 2018, I don't need it and probably never will.

As you have guessed, the only limiting factor will be parts and macOS updates. Since it was manufactured up until 2018, it will become vintage in 2023 and obsolete in 2025. Vintage machines do not receive service from Apple unless you are in Turkey or California. Obsolete cannot receive service from Apple anywhere. Parts for both may be harder to come by. OS updates usually go for 7 years or so from release, so it should receive OS updates until 2023 (though it is possible it could be cut off sooner or go longer). Each OS receives security updates for 2 years after it was replaced. So at current release rates, assuming the 2015 gets a full 7 years of OS updates you would be looking at no longer receiving security updates around 2025, maybe 2027. At the point the machine does not receive security updates, I would suggest retiring it.

TL;DR: You should have until at least 2025 before it no longer gets security updates at which point it should probably be retired from use.
 
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Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
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OP wrote:
"I have an early 2015 MB Pro. Ideally, how much longer do I have with this machine (performance wise, upgrades, etc.)?"

I, too, have a 2015 MacBook Pro, which I purposely chose over the newer 2016 design. Best Mac-buying decision I ever made.

You have a keyboard that feels better and is far, far less likely to fail.
You have a full complement of "legacy ports" -- NO dongles!
You have a display/case cover that is stronger and probably won't suffer from "FlexGate".

I dislike the path that Apple has chosen to go with their 2016-and-later MBPs, and have no interest in owning one.
I will keep the 2015 going as long as I can "keep it going".

I suggest that you think about doing so, as well.

OP also wrote:
"I use it for work, social media, and Microsoft Office. I am guessing a couple of more years?"

Oh, come 2023-2024 you might start considering something new... ;)
 

MultiFinder17

macrumors 68020
Jan 8, 2008
2,016
710
Tampa, Florida
For productivity tasks, you'll be good to do for a while more!

I'm a middle school Robotics teacher, and I use as my main machines a 2010 iMac and a 2012 MacBook Pro, both of which serve me perfectly well. You don't need the latest and greatest to be productive for many tasks :)
 

TGM85

macrumors member
Aug 29, 2005
71
66
To paraphrase the great man himself:

'The early 2015 MacBook Pro is a splendid computer and will remain so for a long time to come. Not to worry.'

I have the same machine and fully intend to use it into the early 2020s.
 

2tallyAwesome

macrumors regular
Jan 16, 2007
194
52
I have a 2014, and purchased a 2018 because I felt it was about time.

I much prefer the 2014, and it's still going strong. I leave the 2018 plugged in at my desk for work (audio technology), and use the 2014 for everything else. While the 2018 is technically faster, I don't really notice it because the 2014 was handling large/intricate Logic sessions just fine. In fact Logic crashes way more often with the 2018 (still trying to figure out why).
 

AnonMac50

macrumors 65816
Mar 24, 2010
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Considering the 15” 2015 were sold until 2018, I would guess they’d be supported by OS upgrades until at least 2023-2025. I would think the 13” model would probably be until then too. I use my 2013 15” for pretty heavy duty stuff, and the way it’s going, I wouldn’t be surprised if it keeps going for many years.
 
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ChrisChaval

macrumors 6502a
Aug 30, 2016
553
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I still use El Capitan because the latest OS's aren't fully compatible with my older machine (Metal support).
El Capitan is solid and reliable for my audio work and I still get updates (security, iTunes, Safari, etc) so I'm happy.
I am sorry but AFAIK El Cap does not receive any security updates any more, not even for safari ..

I still run a Mac mini late 2009 from time to time, the last supported OS for this machine is El Cap, this is how I know

the last security update for El Cap is 2018-004 and dates back to July 2018
[doublepost=1549312510][/doublepost]
I have an early 2015 MB Pro. Ideally, how much longer do I have with this machine (performance wise, upgrades, etc.)?
Judging from my experience you may see 2 more years of OS upgrades and on top of that another 2 years of security updates

that would put your machine on life support at around 2023

the performance I get from my late 2009 Mac mini still is plenty with 8 Gb of RAM and an internal SSD

Those machines could run a whole lot longer if Apple just would let them
 
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