How much should I be able to bench?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by bc008, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. bc008 macrumors 68000

    bc008

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    #1
    well, for the past week or so ive been playing with the weights we have in our basement.

    i was wondering how much should someone who has never lifted weights before, is 14 years old, 160 lbs, 5'6 - 5'7 be able to bench?
     
  2. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #2
    I'd start with a 10 kg on each side.

    If you don't know what that means, then put 20 or 25 lbs on each side. :p
     
  3. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #3
    Someone who is 14 and around 160 lbs. should make sure he knows what he's doing before lifting weights.
     
  4. Daveman Deluxe macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

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    #4
    I agree with rdowns. You really should not bench press at all without a spotter, and in general you ought not to lift weights at all without at least some expert advice. Preferrably somebody to supervise you until you yourself are experienced.

    Also, you probably should not focus on how much you "should be able" to bench. Everybody is different. When I started lifting weights at about your age, I was benching 85 pounds. When I gave up due to lack of time, I was around 145. But other people at my age were benching more or less. This is why an experienced partner helps--he/she can help you find out what an appropriate amount to lift is for you. It also depends on whether you are looking to gain more strength or more endurance. There are a lot of variables.
     
  5. ravenvii macrumors 604

    ravenvii

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    #5
    Just start with 45 lbs (the bar without any weight added) and work your way up. Add about 5 lbs to the bar every time you lift. This is the safest way to ensure that you do not overdo it.

    And if you never lifted before, the above advice is doubly good because you should get your form in shape before you start stacking on the weights.
     
  6. maceleven macrumors 6502

    #6
    your max should be at least 160 , but you should be able to do 3 sets of 10 with about 120 lbs or more
     
  7. revenuee macrumors 68020

    revenuee

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    #7
    you are as strong as you need to be.

    at 14 --- i started with a weight of 135 and was able to bench 65 lbs ...and then went up to weight of 150 and was able to bench 145 within 3 months

    when i don't lift the first few times i can bearly lift anything ... and then it quickly come back

    but the idea is that just because others our age and weight can do it ... doesn't mean you need too -- at 14 heavy lifting is not the best idea --- everything is still growing --- a lot

    not to say you CAN'T do it ... lots of people do and are fine ... but the risks are there to be aware of
     
  8. WillMak macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 29, 2005
    #8
    After three months you should hitting at least 110 lbs. From three - 9 months you should be hitting at least 145. And then from a year - two year after that you should be at 180. These are the marks you should be hitting for reps.
     
  9. twoodcc macrumors P6

    twoodcc

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    #9
    and where did you dream this up?

    there is no way to know that. he might not be able to do 70 pounds since he's never lifted. or he may be able to do over 100. but 160 on the first day ever? i don't think so

    just start with the bar, like others have said. if you can, get a partner. see how many times you can do the bar. if its easy, don't go up the first day. do it 30 times if you can. you have tons of time to go up in weight later
     
  10. ravenvii macrumors 604

    ravenvii

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    #10
    If you want to get serious, try Rippetoe's program.

    Day A
    3x5 squat
    3x5 bench press
    1x5 deadlift

    Day B
    3x5 squat
    3x5 standing military press
    5x3 power clean

    Do those three times a week (in non-consecutive days). Like, on monday do day A, wednesday do day B, friday do day A, then following monday do day B, following wednesday do day A, and so on.

    Begin with just the bar itself, and work up from there. It's better to start light than to start heavy, and you WILL eventually reach your limit, pretty quickly too.

    For squats and deadlifts, up about 15-20 lbs per workout, for bench and military, up about 5-10.

    Sounds simple, and it is. But it'll get you off on a great start. It's effectiveness will wear off after a year or so, then after that you can maintain, or look for more advanced programs.
     
  11. maccam macrumors 6502a

    maccam

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    #11
    Hmm... I'm 6' 1", 260lbs. 15 years old and I can bench a good 260lbs.
    So one word, PIP SQUEAKS!!!
     
  12. imac/cheese macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    Whew. They grow them big in Wisconsin! Must be all that cheese.
     
  13. bartelby macrumors Core

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    #13
    That's two words.


    At 14 your skeleton is still growing. Putting too much pressure on joints and bones could lead to problems in later life.
     
  14. devilot Moderator emeritus

    devilot

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    May 1, 2005
    #14
    Thank you for saying that.

    Yes, that was my thought, too. There's always time to go up, but if you injure yourself first...


    And no a spotter or partner will NOT cut it.

    You need a trained professional-- a coach or trainer. Someone who knows all about this. Seriously.
     
  15. MarkCollette macrumors 68000

    MarkCollette

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    #15
    Personally, I don't use a barbell at all for bench press. I use dumbells. It's much safer, since you can't get trapped underneath, and it works out muscles that the barbell won't. I can lift a lot more with a machine than I can with the dumbells, but the point is not to have some high number to tell others, the point is to be strong and look good.
     
  16. Daveman Deluxe macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

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    #16
    MarkCollette brings up a good point: free weights will give you a better workout than machine weights. That's because machines do all of the balancing for you. It takes a lot more of your energy and gives you more exercise overall to do a bench press with a bar or dumbbells because you have to work to keep the bar in the proper position horizontally in addition to lifting it vertically. The upside to machines is that they take care of a lot of the "good form" aspect of things.

    Back when I was benching 145 lbs., I could easily do 180 on the machine. It makes a big difference.
     
  17. gadgetgirl85 macrumors 68040

    gadgetgirl85

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    Mar 24, 2006
    #17
    If you want to strengthen your abs/core try benching with dumbbells on one of those fitballs. MUCH harder!
     
  18. bc008 thread starter macrumors 68000

    bc008

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    #18
    well, my bro spotted me (hes been lifting weights for the past 6 years). I have been doing it with the bar, and 5 pounds on both sides (55 lbs) its funny looking at that, thinking you should be able to lift a lot more, but after i lifted that about 8 or 9 times my arms hurt bad!

    this wasnt really a "how strong should i be thread" but more of a "how much should i bench before i hurt myself"

    these are "free weights" also. one more thing, how often should i lift? my bro said every other day so i can give my muscles time to relax.
     
  19. RedDragon870503 macrumors 6502

    RedDragon870503

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    #19
    I'm 175 and 20.

    Bench; 325... Squat 435...

    Always remember; the four most important parts of lifting: Squats, Bench, Pull ups, and Squats.

    To answer the OP and get off my horse... Your body weight is always a great benchmark for a beginner.
     
  20. MarkCollette macrumors 68000

    MarkCollette

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    #20
    I target 12 reps, since I'm trying to get stronger, and not show off. And make sure that the pain is just sore muscles, and not injury pain. Other than that, just add weights as long as it feels ok. No one else can tell you how much you should be lifting.
     
  21. Daveman Deluxe macrumors 68000

    Daveman Deluxe

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    #21
    Every muscle group should have a full 48 hours to rest and rebuild themselves between workouts. People who work out every day do so in such a way as to target specific muscle groups on one day, then others on the next day.
     
  22. Poopface Morty macrumors regular

    Poopface Morty

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    #22
    I started lifting around 14, and I regrettably started by using a machine. Barbells are good if you want to look cool and you want "OK" results, but dumbbells are far better for you. You have a greater range of movement to go through, and moving two independent weights challenges your coordination far greater than a barbell bench will.


    Best thing I can say is the best workout is the one your body hasn't adapted to yet. Doing different lifts and mixing up your routine will force your muscles to work harder, and will encourage growth. Mix it up with incline dumbbell presses, where the bench is at an incline, to standard bench dumbbell presses, do some decline ones, and do alternating dumbbell presses, where you hold both over your head, and lower one and press that back up, and do the same thing for the other arm. Dumbbells are safer to work with than barbells, since you won't need to be so dependent on a spotter, and will help a lot more.

    At 14, I would start with 25 pound dumbbells on bench, 15 on decline/incline, and work your way up from there. If it sounds small, just remember, everybody has to start somewhere.
     
  23. ravenvii macrumors 604

    ravenvii

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    #23
    No deadlift?

    Fail.
     
  24. Leareth macrumors 68000

    Leareth

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    Vancouver
    #24
    At 14 you ought to focus more on how many times rather that how much.

    Do not put too much weight stress on skeleton.

    80-100 pound max in your teens, work on flexibility and endurance more.
    when you get to your 20's you will appreciate have toned nice muscles and still being able to bend over to tie your shoe laces.

    My rule is that everybody should be able to bench press/ lift their own body weight. ideally 1.25X .
    Then work on endurance of at that weight instead of trying to crank it higher and higher strenght.
     
  25. gadgetgirl85 macrumors 68040

    gadgetgirl85

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    Mar 24, 2006
    #25
    Hmm, I can't bench my own weight :( But then I am a girl and don't spend enough time at the weights :D I am a cardio addict
     

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