How much VRAM for 24" iMac?

netdog

macrumors 603
Original poster
Feb 6, 2006
5,762
36
London
I called to switch but it shipped today...3 days early. I am sure I will be fine with it. Thanks to all for the detailed advice.

I ordered a 24" with 2GB of system RAM and 128MB of VRAM.

I do light video editing (iMovie, FCP), but mostly just browsing, email, web. Am I going to kick myself for not getting the 256MB option? Changing my order would slow things down significantly as it is due to ship now on September 21st.

To be fair, I have been VERY happy with 128 on my 20" iMac Core Duo.
 

orangezorki

macrumors 6502a
Aug 30, 2006
618
17
You may well need no more than the stock GPU, but remember that the upgrade on the 24" is not just VRAM, it is a whole new, significantly faster video card.

David
 

jessep28

macrumors 6502
Sep 8, 2006
380
0
Omaha, NE
Just so I don't make a new topic I will add to this one:

Will the 128MB video card be fine if I purchase a TV tuner?
 

daneoni

macrumors G4
Mar 24, 2006
10,803
79
128 is plenty for most uses.. However, since you're asking i'd play it safe and get the 256, better safe than sorry
 

FFTT

macrumors 68030
Apr 17, 2004
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A Stoned Throw From Ground Zero
I would be very careful connecting cable or satellite to your computer.

While I totally understand how nice it could be to have your favorite shows
right there on your display, I would never leave the converter box connected
when my system was not attended.

One good thunderstorm or a power surge on the cable and you could lose your motherboard.
 

ipoddin

macrumors 65816
Jan 6, 2004
1,022
78
Los Angeles
netdog said:
I ordered a 24" with 2GB of system RAM and 128MB of VRAM.

I do light video editing (iMovie, FCP), but mostly just browsing, email, web. Am I going to kick myself for not getting the 256MB option? Changing my order would slow things down significantly as it is due to ship now on September 21st.

To be fair, I have been VERY happy with 128 on my 20" iMac Core Duo.
no you won't kick yourself. For your purposes 128mb graphic card is just fine. You would be kicking yourself if you wanted to do 3D apps where the card would actually make a difference, like playing high end games. Otherwise, the card makes no difference whatsoever and you'd be throwing money away on the 256mb option.
 

FFTT

macrumors 68030
Apr 17, 2004
2,952
0
A Stoned Throw From Ground Zero
I haven't followed up much on the iTV yet.

I'm not sure if it's set up to send a WiFi signal from your Mac to your TV
or from your T.V. to your Mac or both.

If it enables you to view TV content wirelessly on your Mac that would be ultimate.
 

jessep28

macrumors 6502
Sep 8, 2006
380
0
Omaha, NE
It would be nice to put content on my Mac when I get it so I can watch it while working, etc.

Yeah a DVR is nice, but I am working/at school so much of the ti me, I often miss a lot of programs because I forget to record it, etc.
 

FFTT

macrumors 68030
Apr 17, 2004
2,952
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A Stoned Throw From Ground Zero
Leaving your system connected to Satellite or Cable TV cable could induce accute
neurosis like wondering if you left the coffee maker on, but much more serious.

Und zat vil be our zession for today.;)
 

budugu

macrumors 6502
Sep 8, 2004
433
0
Boston, MA
Change it ASAP! 7300 GT <= X1600 pro in performance

netdog said:
I ordered a 24" with 2GB of system RAM and 128MB of VRAM.

I do light video editing (iMovie, FCP), but mostly just browsing, email, web. Am I going to kick myself for not getting the 256MB option? Changing my order would slow things down significantly as it is due to ship now on September 21st.

To be fair, I have been VERY happy with 128 on my 20" iMac Core Duo.
Not only will you be kicking yourself but you will also greatly reduce the resale value of your mac because of it. More importantly the 7300 GT is definitely not an improvement over x1600s on the lower end machines. 7600GT is more respectable. 100$ upgrade is totally worth it.
 

MacBandit

macrumors 604
FFTT said:
I would be very careful connecting cable or satellite to your computer.

While I totally understand how nice it could be to have your favorite shows
right there on your display, I would never leave the converter box connected
when my system was not attended.

One good thunderstorm or a power surge on the cable and you could lose your motherboard.

How is it anymore risky then plugging it into a power outlet or connecting your computer to an outside networks like DSL or Cable?

You can surge arrest Cable and Satellite connections if that's your worry.
 

FFTT

macrumors 68030
Apr 17, 2004
2,952
0
A Stoned Throw From Ground Zero
Many utilities share the neutral from your incoming power cables.

A simple branch falling between the hot and the neutral can send a surge so
fast through your system, that nothing man made can stop it.

I've got a pile of 8 Modems that were ALL surge protected, but they took
a fatal hit anyway.

I've had both the power company and the phone company area supervisors
out here and that's how I learned why it can happen.

Lightening just adds another flavor to the sizzle.

It all depends on where you live I guess.
 

Ladybug

macrumors 68000
Apr 13, 2006
1,692
766
Get the video upgrade...

1. Look to the future, you never know what you might be wanting to run in a few years

2. Better resale value

3. If you don't, you'll always be questioning your decision not to :)
 

zerolight

macrumors 6502
Mar 6, 2006
486
70
Glasgow
If you decide later that you want to play games on it there are a couple of things to consider.

1. It's an LCD and so only really looks good running it's native resolution (in this case at 1900xwhatever).

2. If you run at native res (see 1) then that's going to put a huge demand on the gfx card. I'm not convinced that even the 7600GT is going to cope that well with games at 1900 odd resolution. But it'll cope better than the x1600.
 

netdog

macrumors 603
Original poster
Feb 6, 2006
5,762
36
London
I won't be playing games. As I said, the biggest demand is only light video editing with FCP and iMovie. How much VRAM do these really need to perform at a decent level?

How does the Leopard preview seem to lean on the video card?

Future versions of OS X?

I am not a gamer, and will not be a gamer.
 

zerolight

macrumors 6502
Mar 6, 2006
486
70
Glasgow
I'm a gamer. But not on a Mac, just the 360. For me, I felt that the cost to upgrade to the significantly better GFX card was small enough that I ordered my 24 with it. I just felt that with such a high resolution screen, it would perhaps be advantageous to future-proof just in case.
 

netdog

macrumors 603
Original poster
Feb 6, 2006
5,762
36
London
I called to switch but it shipped today...3 days early. I am sure I will be fine with it. Thanks to all for the detailed advice.
 

generik

macrumors 601
Aug 5, 2005
4,116
1
Minitrue
jessep28 said:
Just so I don't make a new topic I will add to this one:

Will the 128MB video card be fine if I purchase a TV tuner?
I am running my TV tuner off integrated graphics :eek:
 

MacBandit

macrumors 604
FFTT said:
Many utilities share the neutral from your incoming power cables.

A simple branch falling between the hot and the neutral can send a surge so
fast through your system, that nothing man made can stop it.

I've got a pile of 8 Modems that were ALL surge protected, but they took
a fatal hit anyway.

I've had both the power company and the phone company area supervisors
out here and that's how I learned why it can happen.

Lightening just adds another flavor to the sizzle.

It all depends on where you live I guess.
This is true. So I'm still not quite grasping your issue with being connected to cable or satellite? Do you unplug the power from your computer whenever your not using it?
 

FFTT

macrumors 68030
Apr 17, 2004
2,952
0
A Stoned Throw From Ground Zero
Most good surge protectors and UPS do a pretty good job of protecting appliances plugged into the power outlets, but they do a miserable job protecting phone and cable lines.

If you have a wireless router, at worst your router may take the hit, but
anything plugged in to phone or TV cable is still vulnerable.

It really all depends on the path of least resistant and grounding.

If you happen to be plugged in during a neutral fault your computer's power cable may go unaffected, but you can still lose a modem, a router or a TV tuner.

Are you feeling lucky?
 

MacBandit

macrumors 604
FFTT said:
Most good surge protectors and UPS do a pretty good job of protecting appliances plugged into the power outlets, but they do a miserable job protecting phone and cable lines.

If you have a wireless router, at worst your router may take the hit, but
anything plugged in to phone or TV cable is still vulnerable.

It really all depends on the path of least resistant and grounding.

If you happen to be plugged in during a neutral fault your computer's power cable may go unaffected, but you can still lose a modem, a router or a TV tuner.

Are you feeling lucky?

Yup not worried about it. I have insurance and I've checked to make sure my insurance covers a power related loss. There's so many possibilities anyhow I doubt many people worry about a surge enough to try to make everything wireless.