How Much Will Windows Limit My Autodesk Workflow?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by benjaminaho, Jan 3, 2011.

  1. benjaminaho, Jan 3, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2011

    benjaminaho macrumors member

    benjaminaho

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Location:
    United States
    #1
    Hi everyone.

    I am going to get some Autodesk software for my Macbook Pro, and I was going to get an Entertainment Creation Suite (educational.) The only applications that work on a Mac on it are Maya, Mudbox, and Sketchbook Pro, the others (3ds Max, MotionBuilder and Softimage) I was thinking of installing on Windows on my Mac. Now I was also thinking of getting AutoCAD for the Windows side or the Mac side, so I can import DWG files into Maya. so I have a few questions:

    1. Is this even a good idea to have all my applications on separate operating systems? How much will this limit my workflow? Any ideas?

    2. Do I need AutoCAD? Can I make good enough buildings and structures in Maya of Mudbox alone?

    3. If I were to get Windows, should I get AutoCAD for Mac or Windows? Which will be best for my workflow?

    4. Should I get 3ds Max Design instead of AutoCAD? Will it be easier to import to Maya (3ds Max Design > 3ds Max > Maya?) Is that possible?

    Whenever I say workflow, I mean transferring files from one place to another, not specifically Apple Script or anything.

    Thank you!!!
     
  2. brucem91 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    #2
    What are you using it for? As far as I know, you will generally be using either Maya OR 3ds Max OR SoftImage XSI. Between the programs I find people will wind up using one to work with. What are you thinking about doing, that may make it easier to recommend what program to use.

    BTW, I use Maya 2011 on my iMac just fine. On my Dell I use Maya 2010 (I got the educational suite). I've only really used Maya, but I did install softimage to test it out. I find just sticking to maya works just fine.
     
  3. benjaminaho thread starter macrumors member

    benjaminaho

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
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    United States
    #3
    I was planing on using Mudbox to make my images and designs, import it into Maya, and then use MotionBuilder to make some… well… motion! I know I could do that on Maya, but I rather on MotionBuilder. But my question is that should I buy AutoCAD to make structures, or could I do this on Maya well enough. Also, is it a good idea to run these on separate OSs. Also, if I do get another application, what should it be (AutoCAD, for Mac, Architecture, 3ds Max Design, etc?)

    Thank you!
     
  4. brucem91 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    #4
    I would honestly just stick with Maya to start out. Maya is an all-in-one package, meaning you can model, texture, rig, animate, and render all in one program. Also, AutoCad really isn't mean for 3D Environments for like an animated film. You can do it just fine in maya.

    BTW, you mention student version. Are you or will you be in college?If so you can get a free 3 year license of Maya 2011 from students.autodesk.com if you use your academic email.

    As far as separate OS's, it is no problem. However if you are just sticking with Maya (which I REALLY recommended for a beginner), staying in OS X is no problem at all.
     
  5. benjaminaho thread starter macrumors member

    benjaminaho

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Location:
    United States
    #5
    Thank you! Now I was going to get it from students.autodesk.com with the 3 year license, however with that I would get watermarks, so I didn't want that (not that I would sell it or anything, I just hate watermarks.) So, I was going to purchase http://www.studica.com/us/en/Autodesk/autodesk_education_suite_for_entertainment_creation_2011.html which is perpetual.
    Now with Maya do you really think I could create buildings, or simple structures? I mean, I've seen demos and things and it doesn't look to user friendly (apposed to AutoCAD,) but is it still worth learning (or easy to learn?) But I guess as long as Maya can shape, color and detail, I guess it'll work. I guess what I'm worried about is the detailing part.
    I guess I'm kind of blabering. Anyway, just wondering, just seeing those demos, and seeing how large the facets are, is there anyway to model with no facets in Maya? Or is it even hard to model with facets?

    Thanks!
     
  6. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #6
    The student edition of Maya does not have watermarks. There is no difference between the regular and academic version. I use it all the time for class. (Using it as we speak). I often render to 1080p and import the frames into Quicktime to make a movie of whatever I had to render.

    As for learning Maya, the best thing to do (which will save you lots of time and money in the long run) is to grab a Lynda.com subscription. They are $20 a month for unlimited access to their entire training library. Its the fastest way hands down to learn Maya.

    Once you've watched the Lynda.com tutorials if you want more in depth and advanced tutorials you can then switch to Digital Tutors which is another online video site. I don't recommend them for beginners though their stuff is really advanced and even their beginner stuff has you doing a lot of intensive things.

    Also in Maya you can model any way you want. There is no limitation.
     
  7. brucem91 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    #7
    you can create anything with maya. Autocad is more meant for industrial work, designing buildings and such for display. As far as the film/video game/hobbyist goes, Maya is the way to go. For example, I am currently modeling a head in Maya. As far as buildings go, it is the almost the exact same. 3D models consist of what is called "polygons", which is the 3d interpretation of your model. Once you learn the ins and outs of polygons, you can model almost anything in maya. For example, here is a building I modeled in Maya a few months ago.


    Facets?

    Also, no watermark. I am currently using 2011 with a license from students.autodesk.com, and I get no watermarks for rendering. If you want proof, here is a car I rendered a few weeks ago in Maya:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxh61nh-O1A
     

    Attached Files:

  8. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
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  9. brucem91 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    #9
    Thanks. That building was just one of the early render tests, not the final. I could do way better than that building now.
     
  10. benjaminaho thread starter macrumors member

    benjaminaho

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Location:
    United States
    #10
    Thank you all so much! Sorry to ask so many questions, but… is Mudbox good for inanimate objects, or is it only good for organic things, like animals or creatures? Is it a bad idea?

    And by facets I meant polygons, facets is just an unofficial way of saying it. Like:
     

    Attached Files:

  11. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
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    #11
    Mudbox is more like ZBrush, its kind of a digital sculpting tool to add a LOT of detail. it is a bit different of a workflow. I've never used Mudbox but I have used ZBrush and according to most people the two are very similar.
     
  12. brucem91 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    #12
    I've never heard the term facets. They are normally called faces or polies/polygons. Honestly, just stick with Maya if you are beginning. With enough practice, you can model anything in Maya. Mudbox is an attempt to compete with ZBrush, but ZBrush is way better. I use ZBrush for blocking out the volume of a 3d model, and then I retopo in Maya. ZBrush (and I assume Mudbox), are essentially digital sculpting programs. ZBrush is great for blocking out a model, as well as high-detail work. But seriously, just stick with Maya for now, you will go far. Good luck
     
  13. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    Isla Nublar
    #13
    +1 for sticking with Maya for now. ZBrush, while a very amazing program, is not exactly pick up and play friendly (especially the zooming wtf).

    Once you get good with Maya you can learn ZBrush and use GoZ to switch your mesh back and forth between programs.
     

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