How safe is it to delete Apple-installed default apps?

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by vlark, Apr 18, 2014.

  1. vlark macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    #1
    Apple is turning off support for iChat/AIM if you use a mac.com or me.com ID for anything under 10.7.2 starting in May:

    http://support.apple.com/kb/TS5224

    which got me to thinking that I never use iChat. And come to think of it, I never use the Airport Base Station Utility, or a whole bunch of other standard stuff Apple installs with a base system install.

    Is it safe to remove these--just trash them and be done with it using ApplCleaner or AppDelete--or are there underlying system processes that require these apps to be present?
     
  2. eyoungren macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #2
    No, not really, especially ones like iChat, iTunes, etc. I would bin them first though just in case you ever need them again.

    However, I'd caution against wholesale cleaning of the Utilitites folder. While nothing is really dependent on a lot of those apps in there, there are some things you cannot do without them. For instance, Directory Utility allows you to enable/disable the root user and change the password. You can work around not having this app with terminal commands, but why would you?

    So, unless you know what the apps in the Utilities folder really do I'd suggest leaving that alone. Especially so if you are not hurting for drive space.
     
  3. vlark thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    #3
    Ok, good to know! I was worried that there might be some underlying framework issues that would arise if I simply archived and deleted any default-installed app.

    For the record, yes, I am pinched for drive space. I had two 80GB Western Digital drives installed on the main IDE bus and one of them started making a funny sound on startup; it passed DiskWarror media tests, but it sounded like an airplane taking off and so I know it was only a matter of time. I migrated all the material off and burned a bunch of data to DVDs and moved some more to a 250GB laptop drive in a USB external enclosure.

    I have an old Sonnet PATA card that runs great under Tiger but isn't recognized under Leopard at all. I'd love to go SATA, but a regular PCI card that's compatible in a G4 is out of my price range right now.
     
  4. eyoungren macrumors P6

    eyoungren

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2011
    Location:
    Phoenix • 85037
    #4
    Two things.

    1. You can drop $10 on a PC version SATA card and flash it to Mac (you need a PC to do that though). All you need are the cables and the power adapters which run anywhere from $3-6. There is a thread here on how to do that. I saved myself $60 because of that thread.
    2. You could try using the Tiger SATA drivers in Leopard. Just find them in the system under Tiger and move them over to your Leopard install. That might work - or might not. I am just assuming there are drivers to move over too.
     
  5. vlark thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    #5
    Option 1 is out because I don't have access to a PC.

    Option 2 is out because it doesn't work. This is an old Sonnet Tempo ATA-66 card and is unsupported under Leopard. I've tried moving the kext files over with no luck.
     
  6. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #6
    Did you properly load the kext into Leopard or just copy them in the Finder? If you did the latter it definitely won't work.
     
  7. vlark thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    #7
    No, I used some kext installer script that moved the files and set the correct permissions, etc.
     
  8. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #8
    I just wanted to make sure. As you know, kexts require Terminal commands to properly work with the system.
     

Share This Page