How should i read!?

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by Metal Dice, Jun 24, 2009.

  1. Metal Dice macrumors regular

    Metal Dice

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2009
    Location:
    Denmark
    #1
    Okay so i'm going to read the book. Programming in Objective-C
    But im not sure how i should do this.
    Just read the book without taking any notes. Or take notes while reading...
    Can anybody tell me the best way to learn it good(first priority) and fast.

    What did you do etc.
     
  2. ethical macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    #2
    Make sure you get the 2.0 version.

    I find that copying out the examples as you read them helps, then the book goes through the examples bit by bit. It's much easier to read the code you have written on the computer than what is written in the book.... or at least that's what I've found.

    Im reading this book at the moment, and it's very good, explains things very well. One of the first thing's you'll learn is the use of "//" or "/* */" to write comments that wont be read by the compiler.... I've found it's really useful to annotate the code as much as possible. So yeah, just read the book really and definitely work through the examples and exercises at the end of the chapters.... and certainly take notes if it helps, there is a lot to remember.
     
  3. toughturtle macrumors newbie

    toughturtle

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2009
    Location:
    NYC
    #3
    And, remember, during development/learning/practice/tutorials or whatever... NSLOG can be your best friend.
     
  4. Darkroom Guest

    Darkroom

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    Dec 15, 2006
    Location:
    Montréal, Canada
    #4
    seriously... where would we be without NSLog()? :)
     
  5. TAJones99 macrumors member

    TAJones99

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2009
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    #5
    Yeah This book is great I done learned so much from it I dont have a programming background and I'm able to learn and do, I read the whole book first then I read it again but the second time I did all the exercises and programs I found that helped me a lot just dont give up.
     
  6. Metal Dice thread starter macrumors regular

    Metal Dice

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2009
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    Denmark
    #6
    Did you write any notes or did you just read it.
     
  7. Darkroom Guest

    Darkroom

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2006
    Location:
    Montréal, Canada
    #7
    it is a great book. the recent 2.0 version isn't necessary unless you want to use obj-c 2.0 features. you could read this book, then later when your comfortable with it get the 2.0 book as a refresher and intro to new 2.0 features.

    personally, i didn't take notes. these books are great reference books (much better than googling for answers), after you finish the book you'll refer to the index a lot... unless, of course, you have a photographic memory.

    when you finish this book, i *strongly* recommend buying Beginning iPhone Development. it's one of the clearest, easy-to-follow, well-written and informative dev books i've ever read.
     
  8. Metal Dice thread starter macrumors regular

    Metal Dice

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    Jun 3, 2009
    Location:
    Denmark
    #8
    Thank you for the help :) I've just bought the book you mentioned
     
  9. firewood macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #9
    The only way to learn programming is by doing it.

    Read, take notes, close the book, start up the computer, and see if you've read carefully enough to rewrite the example. If not, open the book, reread, close it, then try again. Don't copy code from the book or your notes, look up the API details needed in the actual SDK API documentation. Then add your own customization to the example. Then combine features from multiple examples. Then eventually you'll have enough tools in your head to start writing your own programs. Keep learning and you'll increase the number of tools in your head, and the N-squared possible ways of combining them to create solutions.

    The problem with most of the currently recommended books is that they're really designed as (excellent, btw) semi-references for people who already know how to program: the examples are s*ckingly boring and unintuitive for true beginners.


    imho.
     
  10. uraniumwilly macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2007
    #10
    Thanks to all who took the time to respond to this beginners question. I'm just starting out too and have found these suggestions very helpful.
     
  11. TAJones99 macrumors member

    TAJones99

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2009
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    #11
    I didnt take notes at all but I used a highlighter to point out all the need to know info.
     

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