How to admin my Airport externally?

jvacek

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 19, 2011
16
1
I'll be going to uni overseas next scholar year (hopefully). Thing is, no one in my family is able to maintain the network, and so I'm looking into ways on how to get into my 1st gen express (but to be replaced with the 802.11ac Extreme soon).

The set-up currently looks like this:
The modem/wifi/TV ISP hybrid (aka bbox, from Belgacom) is my first router, essentially, but has wi-fi disabled because it's pretty unreliable. Via LAN, I have the airport connected on Bridge mode. This means all DHCP is done on the bbox itself and the airport is just broadcasting that.

The idea is that I will be accessing this airport from Scotland, but now how to get to it? First, it's behind that dumb b-box router. If I were to somewhat bypass that thing, I'd have to connect via PPPoE (right?) and to be honest that is totally beyond me. The IP is dynamic, so I'd have to figure out a way to get a "static" IP like the late DynDNS to work with the airport exprerss. Maybe No-IP.org? OpenDNS?

Could anyone please help me with this? thanks in advance!
 

Curun

macrumors 6502
Sep 10, 2013
314
1
I'd use LogMeIn to remote in and tweak. That's what I do for my father's network. We run DynDNS on his security cam DVR.

But really, how much remote management do you need to do...

At home my UVerse modem/router hybrid I set to DMZPluz mode and have my Airport Extreme act as main and sole router issuing DHCP and works great. Again, logmein if I need anything at home.
 

jvacek

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 19, 2011
16
1
I'd use LogMeIn to remote in and tweak. That's what I do for my father's network. We run DynDNS on his security cam DVR.

But really, how much remote management do you need to do...
Is this something similar to team viewer? I'd rather not use that, to be honest. It would be great to access to airport directly through the utility.

There is like 20+ devices which could access the network, and I change the SSID to get rid of those they forgot about.

Also, I like to f with them a little bit. Like when they hide the cookie jar, the SSID changes accordingly.

Another thing is that I would like to later use this airport to forward my ports and possibly access the printer and the hard disk (once we get the ac) remotely too.

I could set up one of those Teamviewer backdoors, but I'd rather not as I'd have to do that through someone's computer and they'd see everything through the screens. Moreover, if they are not connected to the wi-fi, this is no longer an option, and I have to get into the airport itself.
 

Curun

macrumors 6502
Sep 10, 2013
314
1
Is this something similar to team viewer? I'd rather not use that, to be honest. It would be great to access to airport directly through the utility.
Yes it is. The utility is too limited. Get a linux router and load DDWRT.

There is like 20+ devices which could access the network, and I change the SSID to get rid of those they forgot about.
What does this even mean?

Also, I like to f with them a little bit. Like when they hide the cookie jar, the SSID changes accordingly.
Really...? I thought this was family. Why make it so much harder on non-techies. Take a step in Apple's footprint, and make it 'just work'.

I could set up one of those Teamviewer backdoors, but I'd rather not as I'd have to do that through someone's computer and they'd see everything through the screens. Moreover, if they are not connected to the wi-fi, this is no longer an option, and I have to get into the airport itself.
Stop being a prick, leave them connected.
 

jvacek

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 19, 2011
16
1
Stop being a prick, leave them connected.
I'm sorry if it offended you, I was just joking. There are actual productive purposes I would need this for.

I do not trust my family to just sit back and not touch things while I'm working with tools like TeamViewer.

However, I cannot do anything if I want to change something which is not allowing them to connect (like changing the password, DHCP reservations, etc). Assuming the airport itself is online, I should be able to get into it the other way.

What does this even mean?
Basically, the way I get rid of unused devices from connecting to the wifi is that I change the SSID. This means that if someone wants to use it, they have to connect to the new SSID. This way I get rid of the iPod, Squeezebox, the 3 windows desktops and other devices that no one uses, and they will have no issues logging back on if they do want to use the network again.
 
Last edited:

Curun

macrumors 6502
Sep 10, 2013
314
1
Basically, the way I get rid of unused devices from connecting to the wifi is that I change the SSID. This means that if someone wants to use it, they have to connect to the new SSID. This way I get rid of the iPod, Squeezebox, the 3 windows desktops and other devices that no one uses, and they will have no issues logging back on if they do want to use the network again.
I still don't understand why leaving an iPod and Squeezebox and desktops connected is any harm...!? That's the purpose, so they have internet connection when they are needed.
 

jvacek

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 19, 2011
16
1
I still don't understand why leaving an iPod and Squeezebox and desktops connected is any harm...!? That's the purpose, so they have internet connection when they are needed.
I try to keep as little devices connected at the same time as possible. I try to assign static local IPs (DHCP reservations?) to all the devices so I always know which device is which just by the IP address. This is for SSHing, port forwarding etc. Less is more?
 

NukeIT

macrumors regular
Mar 20, 2013
233
0
KISS (keep it simple stupid)

Your overly complicating things for no reason.

But hey if you have fun doing it. By all means. Enjoy
 

Altemose

macrumors G3
Mar 26, 2013
9,106
444
Elkton, Maryland
I'll be going to uni overseas next scholar year (hopefully). Thing is, no one in my family is able to maintain the network, and so I'm looking into ways on how to get into my 1st gen express (but to be replaced with the 802.11ac Extreme soon).

The set-up currently looks like this:
The modem/wifi/TV ISP hybrid (aka bbox, from Belgacom) is my first router, essentially, but has wi-fi disabled because it's pretty unreliable. Via LAN, I have the airport connected on Bridge mode. This means all DHCP is done on the bbox itself and the airport is just broadcasting that.

The idea is that I will be accessing this airport from Scotland, but now how to get to it? First, it's behind that dumb b-box router. If I were to somewhat bypass that thing, I'd have to connect via PPPoE (right?) and to be honest that is totally beyond me. The IP is dynamic, so I'd have to figure out a way to get a "static" IP like the late DynDNS to work with the airport exprerss. Maybe No-IP.org? OpenDNS?

Could anyone please help me with this? thanks in advance!
I am guessing that is a form of DSL modem. If that is the case you will need to get in touch with your ISP and either have them set your current modem to bridge mode or install a separate simple (not routing) modem for the Internet. Once that is done, your AirPort must be reset and reconfigured. If using a DSL connection, the AirPort must be setup with the appropriate information using PPPoE. If you have a cable service, then it will use DHCP to take the WAN address and perform DHCP and NAT. You will want to check "Allow Setup Over WAN" in AirPort Utility 6. Do not use anything older than 6.3.1 as changing settings within 5.6 on a newer AirPort may cause problems. Then when away from your network, select "Configure Other" and enter the IP address (Global) of the AirPort.

Keep in mind that most addresses are dynamic and change. You will need to keep that in mind when attempting to remotely manage the network. Feel free to report back with any questions.
 

alphaod

macrumors Core
Feb 9, 2008
22,161
1,162
NYC
Set up Back to Mac on the AirPort and then you can see it anywhere in the world with another computer that is logged in with the same iCloud account.
 

priitv8

macrumors 68040
Jan 13, 2011
3,535
444
Estonia
Set up Back to Mac on the AirPort and then you can see it anywhere in the world with another computer that is logged in with the same iCloud account.
That is great advice (I'm using BtMM myself) but that might be impossible, depending on what ISP will allow you to do. As a minimum, you will need AirPort to be your external router.
Still, you can manage one AirPort from wide-area Internet under any circumstances, as long as you make correct port forwarding (TCP port 5009) on your router.
In AP Utility, you just select "Configure Other..." from the File menu and just input public hostname/IP address of your home connection. That's all it takes.
 

Altemose

macrumors G3
Mar 26, 2013
9,106
444
Elkton, Maryland
That is great advice (I'm using BtMM myself) but that might be impossible, depending on what ISP will allow you to do. As a minimum, you will need AirPort to be your external router.
Still, you can manage one AirPort from wide-area Internet under any circumstances, as long as you make correct port forwarding (TCP port 5009) on your router.
In AP Utility, you just select "Configure Other..." from the File menu and just input public hostname/IP address of your home connection. That's all it takes.
I would use Back To My Mac as a failsafe for when the Dynamic IP changes. Just ensure the AirPort is connected to either a simple modem or a modem in bridge mode. You do not want the modem handling routing functions.