How to avoid purple 'flare'?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by timmyb, Nov 30, 2008.

  1. timmyb macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #1
    [​IMG]

    I took this yesterday - what causes the purple flare and how can I avoid it? I'm guessing it's the sun but although I've noticed something similar in a couple of other shots, the vast majority of my ones featuring the sun have no such problems.

    The EXIF data is: D40, 32mm (using the kit lens), 0.004s, f/14, ISO 200
     
  2. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #2
    You avoid it by not pointing your lens directly into the sun light ;)

    The purple flare you see comes from light being reflected inside the lens (between the different lenses). Normally, you don't see it, because the intensity of reflections is very low, but if you point your lens directly into the sun light, you may see it.

    Some types of lenses are more prone to it than others, but you can't avoid it altogether.
     
  3. wheelhot macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    #3
    Isn't using a UV filter will solve this problem?
     
  4. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #4
    No, if you photograph directly into the sun, at certain angles, you will always have lens flare. It depends on the lens on how pronounced it is. A UV filter might reduce the intensity of the blues in the flare, but not by much (it's a UV filter after all that isn't supposed to block the transmission of light in the visible spectrum.
     
  5. SayCheese macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Location:
    Thame, Oxfordshire, England
    #5
    You can get a lens hood which will help reduce the effect in certain circumstances. However if you point your lens directly at the sun then it's almost guaranteed to happen.
     
  6. timmyb thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    #6
    Ok, thanks for the responses. Was what I thought but just wanted confirmation.
    So when taking pictures when the sun is low in the sky what's the best way to avoid it, (if at all possible?)
     
  7. mitchcook macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    #7
    use your imagination to think up pictures that DON'T involve pointing the camera directly into the sun,
    generally use a UV filter to protect your glass anyways!
    use a lens hood if it doesn't bother you...

    eventually your brain will just remember what shots are possible, what shots arent, when looking around... think of the way that the camera will see things! but always remember to look for yourself too! the world is beautiful.
     
  8. termina3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #8
    Or offset the sun somehow…and then check the result in your viewfinder. You're shooting digital, just take the shot realizing that it probably won't work out. Also, the sun is the main attraction in that photo (light attracts the eye). Perhaps try putting off to one side or the other, rather than in the horizontal center of the photo?
     
  9. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #9
    In the case of a lens pointed into the sun remove the filter. The filter only adds to the amount of lens flair. Every glass element adds to the flair problem.

    Another thing to try to stopping dow to about f/8 and using a longer exposure. Most lenses work better at f/8 then when wide open.

    Yes I guess the filter might protect the lens from blowing sand in a sand storm but not much else. Mostly it's just a very high margin item the store sells you. In place of the filter you can use a lens cap it's both strongr and cheaper.
     
  10. wheelhot macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2007
    #10
    I read from a forum where there is this guy he says he use a filter so that he can just stash his camera into the bag without having to apply the lens cap on it. Anyone did this before? It sucks that Canon dont give lens hood for all its lens except for the L series (I wonder how expensive it is just to add a lens hood)
     
  11. termina3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #11
    I don't on a regular basis, but there are times when I'm in a hurry and have to, or I just forget.

    It makes me feel better that I have a filter on. I'm more comfortable exposing the front of the lens, giving to other people, cleaning it, etc, etc. That UV filter never comes off.

    The $50 or $60 I paid was worth the peace of mind.
     
  12. OreoCookie macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2001
    Location:
    Sendai, Japan
    #12
    A UV filter has already saved two lenses of mine, a Tokina 28-70 when it impacted at 30+ km/h on the pavement (don't ask!) and a 80-200 Nikkor (rough driving by a shuttle bus driver). UV filters are helpful, but they don't reduce glare and flare. :)

    However, filters don't replace lens caps!
     
  13. Doylem macrumors 68040

    Doylem

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Location:
    Wherever I hang my hat...
    #13
    You can have the sun in-shot without (too much) flare... if you hide it... or it dips behind a cloud... or the sky is hazy... or it's sunrise or sunset. Anything to take a bit of the power out of the sun, so the camera can 'cope'...

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page