How to bypass a prox server?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by iphonehk, Jul 21, 2009.

  1. iphonehk macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    #1
    Hi,

    am curious to know how can you bypass a proxy server. With all the restrictions in China happening at the moment and not being to get on fb, youtube and well you name it websites. From what I know and see, there are ways to bypass the firewall. Does anyone know how to do it? Would be quite frustrating to not be able to get on anything since I am going to be posted there for a year.

    Can anyone advise?
     
  2. occamsrazor macrumors 6502

    occamsrazor

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    #2
    One of the best ways around the Chinese firewall is Freegate, but it is Windows-only. Perhaps there is a way to run it via virtualization (VMware, Parallels, etc), but I'm not sure.
    Or you can run Tor which does have a Mac version, but the connection is usually much slower.
    Or buy an account with a western commercial VPN service.
     
  3. scienide09 macrumors 65816

    scienide09

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    There's a program called psiphon that might be just what you need.
    http://psiphon.ca/

    Like Tor, its an anonymizing proxy service. However, psiphon puts more control in your hands. Basically, if you have a trusted friend/family member outside of China, they can install and configure psiphon, and then share the address and access password with you. Basically, it allows that person to act as a proxy for you.

    As far as the censors are concerned, to them it looks like you're connecting to a simple IP outside of China. The connection is encrypted, and so you can then browse to sites you need to access.

    For this program, trust is essential. You're basically piggybacking on their Net connection, and so they have to trust you not to do anything illegal. At the same time, you need to trust them not to go snooping around the logs to see what kinds of sites you're exploring. In addition, you don't need to install anything -- the program needs to be installed on the computer outside the firewall.

    Honestly, check it out. It's a fascinating program. Plus, the kinds of work done by the developers are their colleages relate to Internet neutrality, information freedom, and the necessity of the right to information access.
     

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