iPod How to convince a parent...

Garrett

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 4, 2007
173
0
I have the money for one, and all that, just the problem is my parent, my father thinks it's a waste of money when I have a 5.0 G iPod that I got last February...here's what I have so far to tell him.

1. WiFi Capability
2. Powered by NAND Flash memory, making a smaller iPod, with more space.
3. Will have digital radio included, along with a wireless transmitter (Would be great for the truck, instead of using a 3rd party transmiter that never works)
4. To have touch screen capabilitys
5. Wireless syncing, with my Macbook
6. More powerful operating system, Mac OS X, which is what my computer runs on.
7. More storage, for less or the same price, although I might not use it all, it's open for the future

I would appriciate if you guys knew anymore, as he doesn't seem that's good enough.
 

swiftaw

macrumors 603
Jan 31, 2005
6,309
20
Omaha, NE, USA
Well, firstly I would wait to see what features the next iPod actually. The things you have listed are all speculation at this point and I'd doubt that all of them are true.

Saying that, focus not on features but on uses. What will you be able to do on the new one that you wish you could do on the old one. If you are only going to use the new one for listening to music then there is no advantage to the new one. However, if you find yourself needing directions a lot, and IF the new one comes with wifi and google maps like the iPhone does then you can market this a something you need.
 

doublebullout

macrumors member
Jul 23, 2007
30
0
Shreveport, LA
I have the money for one, and all that, just the problem is my parent, my father thinks it's a waste of money when I have a 5.0 G iPod that I got last February
As a parent myself, I can probably guess what the rationale behind his objection is. It's a tough lesson to get across to your kids, but when you're an adult (and especially a parent) it's sometimes very irresponsible to buy toys just because you have the money. You'll often have to make tough financial decisions when you're juggling utility bills, car payments, car insurance, mortgage payments, home insurance, taxes, school fees, kids clothing, Christmases, birthdays, saving for retirement, etc. He just wants to be sure that you're learning how to handle your money responsibly. If you just bought an iPod in February and less than 8 months later want to buy the newest one, it's a legitimate concern.

So here's what I'd suggest. Offer to sell your 5G iPod (via ebay, local ads, here on MacRumors, wherever) first to help offset the cost. It's his decision of course, but that sounds reasonable to me.
 

tingly

macrumors 6502
Apr 27, 2005
277
0
I agree with the parent for the most part. The digital radio receiver is about all that's genuinely needed, but it's not worth it to get a new ipod just for that (and it's not gonna have it, anyway). You'll thank him when you move out and are trying to scrape up money for rent and food. You'd need to get a really good price for the old ipod to make it somewhat worthwhile.
 

Garrett

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 4, 2007
173
0
As a parent myself, I can probably guess what the rationale behind his objection is. It's a tough lesson to get across to your kids, but when you're an adult (and especially a parent) it's sometimes very irresponsible to buy toys just because you have the money. You'll often have to make tough financial decisions when you're juggling utility bills, car payments, car insurance, mortgage payments, home insurance, taxes, school fees, kids clothing, Christmases, birthdays, saving for retirement, etc. He just wants to be sure that you're learning how to handle your money responsibly. If you just bought an iPod in February and less than 8 months later want to buy the newest one, it's a legitimate concern.

So here's what I'd suggest. Offer to sell your 5G iPod (via ebay, local ads, here on MacRumors, wherever) first to help offset the cost. It's his decision of course, but that sounds reasonable to me.
First things first, this was February 2006 when I got my ipod.

See the thing is, that's what he's trying to get across to me. Although it should effect my thoughts down the road, this is now.

I have around $3500 in my savings, and about $2000 in my checkings, which I don't see any logic within not letting me, he says it's not valueable. The thing that's most mind bobbling is that, because since when can he value my money, that I spent making websites for?

Apart from payments, all I have is insurance, $115 a month, easy.

@Update: he has givin up with me telling me no, and now is a yes, quite odd. I won't feel guilty, I stood my principles and, not really won, just was givin access.
 

Sun Baked

macrumors G5
May 19, 2002
14,874
57
Re: How to convince a parent...

There is always mind control or hypnotism.

Note: some thread titles must be answered also.
 

doublebullout

macrumors member
Jul 23, 2007
30
0
Shreveport, LA
First things first, this was February 2006 when I got my ipod.
Thanks for clarifying -- you said "last February" originally.
See the thing is, that's what he's trying to get across to me. Although it should effect my thoughts down the road, this is now.
He's trying to get you to think beyond "now". Unfortunately, a lot of people never think beyond "now". That's the point.
I have around $3500 in my savings, and about $2000 in my checkings, which I don't see any logic within not letting me, he says it's not valueable.
Not sure what the "it" is that's not valuable. The iPod? It's a consumer electronics item. The amount in checking? Ultimately, the value of money is determined by what you do with it. Simple example: $600 spent to learn how to build websites has more value than $600 spent on an iPod because the skill allows you to turn $600 into the opportunity to earn more money.
The thing that's most mind bobbling is that, because since when can he value my money, that I spent making websites for?
He's your father. Part of parenting is preparing your kids for success as adults. When/If you have your own family, you'll understand.
 

Garrett

macrumors regular
Original poster
Apr 4, 2007
173
0
Thanks for clarifying -- you said "last February" originally.He's trying to get you to think beyond "now". Unfortunately, a lot of people never think beyond "now". That's the point.Not sure what the "it" is that's not valuable. The iPod? It's a consumer electronics item. The amount in checking? Ultimately, the value of money is determined by what you do with it. Simple example: $600 spent to learn how to build websites has more value than $600 spent on an iPod because the skill allows you to turn $600 into the opportunity to earn more money.He's your father. Part of parenting is preparing your kids for success as adults. When/If you have your own family, you'll understand.
True, there is just so many little things that he has taken his word back, to now where I might not get one out of the guilt I will feel.

This isn't to be a parenting forum :p so I will just leave it at this.