how to deal with sunglass reflection?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by jplg842, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. jplg842 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    #1
    Hey everyone
    i took some pictures today with someone wearing sunglasses. but it all showed me in the reflection of the glasses!
    how can i remove that.. to just back or anything else... using adobe cs3 or iphoto....
    knowing that i never edit photos and dont know how to use photoshop!

    Thanks :)
     
  2. Scarlet Fever macrumors 68040

    Scarlet Fever

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Location:
    Bookshop!
    #2
    there probably isn't a lot you can do now. In future, a polarising filter may reduce the reflections.
     
  3. mattw126 macrumors member

    mattw126

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Location:
    Naples, FL - Poughkeepsie, NY
    #3
    No time like the present to learn.

    I take out the reflections on glasses of all chosen pictures for the bride and groom album's I design. Due to the volume of images (my studio shoots up to 4 weddings a Saturday (using trusted subcontractors), and the fact that I'm the guy who does the post during the week on all the images, I do this often.

    The below technique is pretty basic, but for a beginner, it's a great way to start. I'm suggesting it, because in the world of retouching, you'll be using it often. In addition to unwanted reflections, this also works great for smiles, closed eyes, bad expressions, etc. That's why I'm suggesting this instead of other techniques, which you might need in this case. I'll let someone else explain those OR post the picture and I'll explain when I see it and I have more time. You can also email me at mattw126@mac.com

    I always start by looking at other shots taken of the subject. If there's one that was shot inside (without direct flash), I'll use this image. If it's a sunglass reflection, this probably won't apply, but another image might have less reflection, start with that.

    Simply make a selection using the marquee tool (keyboard shortcut: M), and grab as much face as you want (you can't really overdue it).

    Next select the Move tool (V) and drag your selection into the picture your editing.

    Reduce the opacity to something like 50% in the layers palette and use Free Transform (Command + T) until the glasses match up. It's important to hold down the Shift key while enlarging as it constrains proportions.

    Select the Eraser tool (E) and control click (secondary mouse button) on the canvas to reduce the softness of the brush. Experiment with what works best with the image and erase everything on the 'borrowed' sunglass' layer that you don't need. Using a soft brush usually blends the new layer in well.

    Bring your opacity back up and make sure color cast is not an issue using curves, levels, selective color, etc. all found under Image> Adjustments.

    Flatten the image under the menu Layers and then use the Clone Stamp (S) to refine your retouch.

    In this image I used his left eye to recreate his 'right eye' using the above technique. Just add a Edit> Transform > Flip Horizontal step, if one eye is good, but the other is unable to be retrieved.
    [​IMG]

    After writing all that, I can't help but think this technique will not apply at all to your situation, but it's a good tool to have in your toolbox for future portrait issues. I hope it helps in this regard. Like I mentioned if you post the image, I can tell you the specific, fastest way of remedying your problem - to the best of my knowledge.
     
  4. jampat macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    #4
    Find the photographer in the picture is a fun game, removing the reflection now may be quite difficult. What makes you visible? Are there bright colors being reflected or just a relatively colorless reflection? If colors are your problem you may be able to clean things up a bit, but it is unlikely you will ever completely clean it up. Your best bet is definitely a polarizer next time.
     
  5. jplg842 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    #5
    thanks mattw126 im trying it now

    i was shooting outside.. and the sunlight on the ground and walls made them appear so clear on the glasses..
    how does the polarizer help reduce that?
     
  6. MacNoobie macrumors 6502a

    MacNoobie

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    Location:
    Colorado
    #6
    Hopefully for future reference you'll ask the subject to tilt their glasses down a notch before shooting it saves you a lot of time afterward or tilt their chin down.
     
  7. jampat macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    #7
    A lot of the time, reflected light has some polarization. By adjusting the polarizer, you can minimize or maximize this reflected light depending on the desired effect. I can't give you an technical explanation, I can just tell you that it has always worked to some extent, sometimes completely.
     
  8. mattw126 macrumors member

    mattw126

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Location:
    Naples, FL - Poughkeepsie, NY
    #8
    No problem, like I said you can use that in a variety of situations. Definitely post a before/after, or if you have a chance, post a 'before' for us to see.

    Polarizer

    *Water and reflective surfaces*
    By eliminating reflections, the polarizing filter will tend to make water and other reflective surfaces more transparent. The effect will also vary depending on the angle to the reflective surface. If you place your camera very low above a river, the effect will be very limited. If you shoot from a bridge above it, the water will look totally transparent.
     
  9. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #9
    Wow. You spent the big $$ in CS3 and don't use it? Read up on masks and adjustment layers

    What I would do in CS3 is first make a "mask" that selects the dark lenses. Then an adjustment layer. Then I'd adjust any highlights or maybe even mid tones in the lenses down to dark tones. I would not use any of the brush tools, Id simply squash the tone values down but don't over do it or you will have solid black. Adjust it just to the point of it looking fake, then back up. If you do it as an adjustment layer it is non-destructive so if you save as a PSD file you will always be able to go back to tweak the effect.

    Next time you do a shoot and the subject does not want to remove the glasses the polarized filter can help but if this is a set up formal shoot an old trick that goes back maybe about 100+ years is to remove the glass from the frames. Not only does this completely prevent reflections but it removes optical distortion where an eye looks larger or smaller through the glasses. The other trick is to use lights that have built-in modeling lights so you can check for reflections and shadows before the shutter is tripped.
     
  10. jplg842 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2007
    #10
    i did this using the burn tool. and it kinda worked..
    this is one of the first pictures i took using any slr camera
     
  11. mattw126 macrumors member

    mattw126

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Location:
    Naples, FL - Poughkeepsie, NY
    #11
    jplg842, I say job well done for one of your first forays into PS. ChrisA mentioned the use of masking. I think you'll find this aspect of PS to be incredibly powerful in the editing of your images. There are plenty of tutorials online and books solely dedicated to the subject, it's worth your time to learn it. Scott Kelby has an excellent online training site for $20 a month. I have an account, but split the cost between 2 other photographers as well as my dad, so I only pay $5. With content being added regularly from contributers like Dave Cross, Matt Kloskowski, Moose Peterson, etc. it's well worth it.
     
  12. termina3 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2007
    Location:
    TX
    #12
    I appreciated it.

    Ah! It's the red martian from mars!!! Bring down that red level!

    If you lighten up his glasses a little it'll be better--few people have purely black glasses.

    Another idea is to use the clonestamp, but after seeing the photo the reflection is too encompassing to have much to clone with…
     

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