How to Encrypt Your iOS Device's iTunes Backup

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macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
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If you connect your iOS device to your computer to back up your data instead of using iCloud, some of your most private data is not backing up. For security reasons, by default, an iTunes backup will not include saved passwords, Wi-Fi settings, website history, or Health data.


You can save information like passwords and website history in an iTunes backup if you encrypt it, which is an option that Apple offers. Encrypted backups are not the default option, but for those of you who want to be able to save more comprehensive backups to your computer, we've created a tutorial that walks you through encrypting iTunes backups and removing that encryption.

If you back up your iOS device using iCloud, you do not have to follow any steps for encryption, as iCloud backups are automatically encrypted for you.



Click here to read more...

Article Link: How to Encrypt Your iOS Device's iTunes Backup
 

jdillings

macrumors 68000
Jun 21, 2015
1,541
5,175
This is very important. You don't want a hacker finding out you own every Miley Cyrus album. Imagine what your family would think of you if this information were leaked.
 

seamer

macrumors 6502
Jul 24, 2009
426
164
Great advice for any ***** iTunes user!

^^
Tsk tsk. Can't have text in an image that is censored when written in a post.
 

Kajje

macrumors 6502a
Dec 6, 2012
721
956
Asia
This article could be useful for the readers with impaired sight.
"[X] Encrypt iPhone backup. This will allow account passwords (...and Health...) data to be backed up."
This notice has been there for many, many years.

Can somebody repost the missing articles
How to backup Your iOS Device in iTunes
How to check checkboxes using the Magic Trackpad

and don't forget folks, always check whether checked checkboxes have been properly checked!
 

Benjamin Frost

Suspended
May 9, 2015
2,405
4,999
London, England
One thing I wish Apple would introduce is the ability to export your complete text messages as pdfs for each contact.

I use iExplorer, which does the job well, but I have to manually do it. It would be better if iTunes automatically backed them up on the Mac and in iCloud.
 
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rhoydotp

macrumors 6502
Sep 28, 2006
467
74
Sure am glad that this rather obscure piece of information that relatively very few people will ever have the need to read is on the front page of MR today. Keep up the quality content, guys!
I am assuming that you are an expert and expects that everybody to be an expert just like you in anything and everything, then I agree with you ... otherwise, I don't understand what you are complaining about.
 

rhoydotp

macrumors 6502
Sep 28, 2006
467
74
This is very important. You don't want a hacker finding out you own every Miley Cyrus album. Imagine what your family would think of you if this information were leaked.
Did you read the purpose why this article was written? Specifically to point out that you can save sensitive information in your backup. But it seems that your definition of sensitive is Miley Cyrus albums, then I have nothing.
 

blindseagull

macrumors newbie
Oct 13, 2011
2
0
Wish I had known this about a month ago when I backed up for a trade-in to replace a cracked screen....I was really sad to find out that all of my Health data was gone and I was starting over. I find that during Doctor check-ups I can show my doc whether I have been good at being active, blood pressure readings, etc. or if I'm being lazy and need a kick in the pants...is a real shame to lose a lot of data.
 

Vladimir Katalov

macrumors newbie
Jul 21, 2015
1
1
The following statement need correction:

"For security reasons, by default, an iTunes backup will not include saved passwords, Wi-Fi settings, website history, or Health data."

All passwords (including ones to Wi-Fi access points) are saved in the device keychain. Keychain data *IS* always included into device backup, but if the backup does not have the password set, then the keychain is encrypted using the "hardware" key unique to every device (and this key is not being changed even after device reset). That means that if you reset from such (not encrypted) backup to the new device, most keychain data is lost. In contrary, if backuip is password-protected, then keychain is encrypted using the key derived from this password (and so can be restored to any other device -- if, of course, the password is known).

Website history is always included into backup. Health data is not.
 
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