How to export .MPEG from QTPro??

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by 2ms, Feb 7, 2009.

  1. 2ms macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2002
    #1
    I'm submitting a video to a scientific journal. They require it to have file extension .mpg or .mpeg.

    How do I get that with Quicktime Pro (or any iLife or whatever software that comes with mac)??

    The closest I see in the list of options for Export is MPEG-4, but that gives you file extension .mp4

    Please help!
     
  2. -DH macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    Nashville Tennessee
    #2
    The .mpg or .mpeg extension could be MPEG-1 or an MPEG-2 Program Stream. Did they not include any other details other than the file extension they want?


    If they do want an MPEG-2 Program Stream, MPEG Streamclip (freeware) can create those, but you'll also need the QuickTime MPEG-2 Playback Component from Apple ($19.99 USD).

    If they want an MPEG-1 file, older versions of QuickTime Pro can create those, or you can use Sorenson Squeeze Suite or Cleaner.

    -DH
     
  3. 2ms thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2002
    #3
    That's all they say -- .mpg or .mpeg. I hate all this crap with incompatible proprietary formats and all.

    So I guess I need to buy the mpeg-2 encoding capability. Can you point me to where you get it? I'm disappointed that mpeg-4 files have different file extension from the other mpeg video formats and I'm disappointed that I have to pay extra money for what's apparently a major standard format. But thanks for you help.
     
  4. -DH macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    Nashville Tennessee
    #4
    There's an old saying that applies well here: "Standards are wonderful ... and there's so many to choose from."

    Firs try downloading MPEG Streamclip from http://www.squared5.com/ See if that will do it without having to buy the QuickTime Component. If you find that you do need it, you can get it here: http://www.apple.com/quicktime/mpeg2/

    In MPEG Streamclip, import the video file you need to convert, then go to File->Export->Convert to MEPG-2 with MP2 Audio

    -DH
     
  5. 2ms thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2002
    #5
    MPEG Streamclip seems to be nice in general, but I don't see any options for any MPEG other than mp4 with it either. Seems so strange to me. Especially since it is called MPEG Streamclip, but no apparent way to get ".mpeg"s out of it :(
     
  6. -DH macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2006
    Location:
    Nashville Tennessee
    #6
    I use it to create MPEG-2 Program Streams almost every day. Did you follow the steps I outlined above?

    -DH
     
  7. hazmatzak macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    #7
    In MPEG Streamclip, there's a difference between the various "Export" and "Convert" options. "Export" does encoding. "Convert" only converts between the various flavors of MPEG-1 and -2; basically between transport and program streams, and between audio formats. It also cuts and joins streams. The source must already be MPEG, otherwise the menu options are disabled. Of note, these functions do not require the MPEG-2 Playback Component (it's not really "looking at" the video).

    MPEG-2 playback and encoding have license costs. The MPEG-2 Playback Component was already out there. Why would MPEG Streamclip reinvent the wheel and pay the fee, which would have to be passed on to users? (Perhaps as a result, Apple paid the license for MPEG-4, covering personal and non-commercial use, with no additional fee for the end-user.)

    As the name suggests, the Playback Component does not encode. So as to the original problem.... First, you can rename any file so that it has an .mpg or .mpeg extension. That doesn't say much for a "scientific" journal. But if you want to create an MPEG-2 file using only what's on a vanilla Mac and free software, you can use iDVD, since DVDs are MPEG-2:
    • Use iDVD to create a new project. You can save a little time by choosing a simple theme (without animation).
    • Drag the movie you want to convert onto the menu, which should create a menu item. You can preview the DVD.
    • Under the File menu, choose Save As Disk Image. This will convert the movie into MPEG-2, without actually burning a disc.
    • Open the .img file that was created. It will mount as a new drive. Go into the VIDEO_TS folder. Your movie comprises the VTS_01_?.VOB files. Depending on the length of the movie, you might have more than one (they are limited to 1GB each). You don't care about the one named VTS_01_0.VOB, if it's there; that's the chapter menu. You want the ones starting with _1.
    • If there is just the one VTS_01_1.VOB, then that's it. Rename that file to something with a .mpg extension.
    • If there is more than one, now you can use MPEG Streamclip. In the Open Files dialog, be sure to sort by name. Then select all the files starting with _1 (again, not _0 if present). Then under the File menu, Convert to MPEG; that will join the files together.
    • You actually might prefer Convert to MPEG with MP2 Audio. It will make the file smaller, and you can hear audio in QuickTime Player (with the MPEG-2 Playback Component). If it's just one file, you can Convert that too.
    Note that if you don't have the MPEG-2 Playback Component, you can still do the work -- you just can't see what you're doing. (The DVD Player will only play MPEGs that are part of DVDs.) Unless you've got something else installed to play them. And for this, you don't actually need QuickTime Pro.
     
  8. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #8
    It would be enormously helpful if you gave a hint about how this video clip will be used. In the absence on any such information, the best bet is that the desired format is MPEG-1. This has been the file format associated with the .mpeg extension for 20 years.

    As other posters have correctly pointed out, MPEG-2 viewing is not free for most users. No scientific journal that I am familiar with will require its subscribers to outlay additional funds for the privilege of viewing its online content. OTOH, virtually every desktop computer in use today can play MPEG-1 out-of-the-box.
     

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