• Did you order new AirTags? We've opened a dedicated AirTags forum.

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
52,488
14,176



Screen-Shot-250x187.jpg
In Chrome 66, rolling out now for Mac and iOS, Google has added a password export option to the web browser so that you can easily migrate your login details to another browser via a third-party password manager app. In this article, we'll show you how to export your passwords from Chrome on Mac and iOS.

At the end of the process, you'll be left with a CSV file containing all your login credentials. Popular password managers like Enpass and 1Password accept CSV files for importing login data. Just be aware that the CSV file you export from Chrome is in plain text. That means your credentials could be read by anyone with access to it, so make sure you securely delete the file once you've imported the data into your password manager of choice.


Click here to read more...

Article Link: How to Export Your Passwords and Login Data From Google Chrome
 
  • Like
Reactions: Milacurtis

zorinlynx

macrumors 604
May 31, 2007
6,523
10,734
Florida, USA
Well, that sounds secure...NOT!

Indeed, it's not secure. But it's nice that the user has the option.

I wish it were possible to export passwords from the MacOS Keychain, so I could put them in my own PGP-encrypted text file as a backup in case I ever move to another platform. But MacOS doesn't allow automated export of Keychain entries.

(Edited to actually type my response; I hit "Post reply" by mistake)
 
Comment

zorinlynx

macrumors 604
May 31, 2007
6,523
10,734
Florida, USA
I'd prefer it if Chrome worked with Keychain on Macs & iDevices.

Chrome and Firefox have their own password databases for the simple reason that they are cross-platform, and thus they can use the same code on MacOS, Windows, and Linux.

Keychain is a MacOS-only thing, so they'd have to have different code on the Mac side to support it. I believe Firefox has an extension that enables storing passwords in Keychain, but I've not used it. Having their own password databases also means you can move between operating systems and keep your data.

Both Chrome and Firefox encrypt their password databases; they're probably no more or less secure than Keychain if you guard the master password well.
 
Comment

PunditOne

macrumors newbie
Apr 19, 2018
1
1
Sounds good if you switching between browsers, but I it's weird imho - i've started using google chrome since it's beta version and still don't want to change it.
In Google all data saves linked to your account- so I just need to login in the browser via the acc and then always use it- and will have the same data on all devices. This way i have one chrome with all data on my PC at home, on my MacBook and on my android cell phone.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MEP6411
Comment

Milacurtis

macrumors newbie
Apr 20, 2018
2
0
I like the option on Chrome. Most of my friends are using 1Password and Dashlane. I have Dashlane on my Mac, does it support CSV files too?

Screen-Shot-250x187.jpg
In Chrome 66, rolling out now for Mac and iOS, Google has added a password export option to the web browser so that you can easily migrate your login details to another browser via a third-party password manager app. In this article, we'll show you how to export your passwords from Chrome on Mac and iOS.

At the end of the process, you'll be left with a CSV file containing all your login credentials. Popular password managers like Enpass and 1Password accept CSV files for importing login data. Just be aware that the CSV file you export from Chrome is in plain text. That means your credentials could be read by anyone with access to it, so make sure you securely delete the file once you've imported the data into your password manager of choice.


Click here to read more...

Article Link: How to Export Your Passwords and Login Data From Google Chrome[/QUOTE]



Screen-Shot-250x187.jpg
In Chrome 66, rolling out now for Mac and iOS, Google has added a password export option to the web browser so that you can easily migrate your login details to another browser via a third-party password manager app. In this article, we'll show you how to export your passwords from Chrome on Mac and iOS.

At the end of the process, you'll be left with a CSV file containing all your login credentials. Popular password managers like Enpass and 1Password accept CSV files for importing login data. Just be aware that the CSV file you export from Chrome is in plain text. That means your credentials could be read by anyone with access to it, so make sure you securely delete the file once you've imported the data into your password manager of choice.


Click here to read more...

Article Link: How to Export Your Passwords and Login Data From Google Chrome
 
Comment

NoBoMac

Moderator
Staff member
Jul 1, 2014
2,954
1,265
On a related note, this export function is a nice option to backup your passwords, if you are OCD (like me) on not totally trusting Google will manage to backup your information correctly and frequently.

I do this from my 3rd party password manager (mSecure), import the CSV into encrypted Excel (xlsx format, NOT xls), and then encrypt the spreadsheet file with a very strong password, which goes onto a USB drive that I hide in the house.
 
Comment
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.