iPad How to extend my home wifi range?

quanchaoda

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 2, 2014
1
0
I create a hotspot with My WIFI Router,but it couldn't strong enough for my bedroom.How can I strength the wifi signal,can this software work as extender as well?
 

aicul

macrumors 6502a
Jun 20, 2007
809
7
no cars, only boats
Before you go shopping just make sure that your router is :

- located in a central spot in the house so that all rooms are the same distance away

- check that the router is not next to some large metal object (i.e. radiator) that will generate some signal distortion and reduce wifi range

- check that there not too many other wifi networks in your area. If so maybe try changing the channel

If the above do not dramatically improve things, then seek out a stronger router or maybe a repeater.
 

rui no onna

macrumors 604
Oct 25, 2013
6,881
3,133
In my experience, the only reliable method to increase wifi range is to install additional wireless access points connected via ethernet to the router/switch.
 

iWeekend

macrumors regular
Nov 28, 2012
116
1
In addition to the above, you generally want the router to be placed as high as possible.
 

Zmanbaseball2

macrumors 68040
Aug 24, 2012
3,523
10
New York, USA
I have this:
Sabrent Wi-Fi Repeater and Range Extender 300mbps 2.4GHZ 801.11N Wall Plug Version (NT-WRPT) by Sabrent http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IKCQ0EK/ref=cm_sw_r_udp_awd_-Yeptb1Y22EF5

My router is in the top right of my home. I have my home wired with Ethernet plugs in many spots. I have a access point in the top left of my home. I use the repeater above to rebroadcast the signal from the access point, which is closer to the center of the house, to the rest of my home. My setup works well.
 

snipper

macrumors regular
Feb 9, 2004
200
22
Maybe if you have a wooden house, you can do with one but even the best WiFi router will not cover your whole house if it's made with 35 cm thick steel enforced concrete floors like mine, even if there are barely other WiFi network signals.

A repeater looks like an easy, plug-and-play solution, but it comes with a huge trade-off: It slices the speed of your WiFi network. Also, the router and repeater signals will partially distort each other, making the signal even weaker.

So connecting a WiFi hotspot, repeater, or WiFi router (put in hotspot mode) via ethernet cable is much more effective. Laying the cable can be a pain but having good WiFi reception for years to come is worth it!

PS 1
Do some experimenting with the position of the routers. 15 inches / 45 cm to the left or right can make a huge difference, specially when placed in corners.

PS 2
The 5 Ghz WiFi channels are often less crowded and it is faster but only if you are very close like in the same room or in line of sight. Else you're probably better off without it.
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,779
14,930
Jacksonville, Florida
I create a hotspot with My WIFI Router,but it couldn't strong enough for my bedroom.How can I strength the wifi signal,can this software work as extender as well?
Not all home wireless outfits are created equal. I had your same problems until I bought the Asus Wireless Router (at Amazon) and I now get full bars through out my entire 3500sf house. I can even go down to my boat dock and get 3 bars. They are not cheap at near $200 but they got the POWER!:apple:
 

snipper

macrumors regular
Feb 9, 2004
200
22
I agree and I'm no AAPL stockholder but the Apple Airport models can be controlled with the Airport Configuration application that comes with OS X. The Airport Express is $99. My Airport / configuration app has solved a lot of s*** with configuration problems. Like: different names for the same config stuff in non-apple routers set-up pages, missing features, incompatible protocols etc.

Also, it has a lot of nice features that might come in handy now or later. You can use it to set up a separate guests network, use it for Airplay, wireless printing etc.
 

Plutonius

macrumors G3
Feb 22, 2003
8,210
6,228
New Hampshire, USA
Maybe if you have a wooden house, you can do with one but even the best WiFi router will not cover your whole house if it's made with 35 cm thick steel enforced concrete floors like mine, even if there are barely other WiFi network signals.
Agreed, but the OP didn't say what type of building he needs this to work in. I found that the majority of problems can be solved by buying an expensive router ($200) with lots of power. Many people buy the cheapest wireless router they can and then complain about network issues.

Not all home wireless outfits are created equal. I had your same problems until I bought the Asus Wireless Router (at Amazon) and I now get full bars through out my entire 3500sf house. I can even go down to my boat dock and get 3 bars. They are not cheap at near $200 but they got the POWER!:apple:
I also bought an Asus router (not sure if it was the same model as you) for $200 at Amazon and I highly recommend it. The power it puts out is amazing.
 

snipper

macrumors regular
Feb 9, 2004
200
22
The power it puts out is amazing.
No idea how rules and regulations are in the US, but here in the Netherlands (I guess in all the EU), WiFi hardware is allowed to be only 100 milliWatt effective transmitting power. That is with an omni-directional antenna; with a pointed antenna or dish antenna it's even lower.

100 mW is not that much. I have never found WiFi hardware that is even less. If you are going to pay more for a certain model, don't just assume more expense equals more transmitting power, but check it first.

IMHO the transmitting power is only one of the factors. As mentioned, place, height, frequency, number of competing WiFi networks, building materials are also important, and also the number of antennas and their shape.

802.11n ideally needs different antennas. Separate antennas for different frequencies, receiving and sending is a pre. The cheaper models don't have those. By cheaper I mean € 25 to € 75 / $ 35 to $ 100.
 

jrs22

macrumors 6502
Aug 1, 2012
331
35
PS 1
Do some experimenting with the position of the routers. 15 inches / 45 cm to the left or right can make a huge difference, specially when placed in corners.
Are corners good or bad as a router location?
 

snipper

macrumors regular
Feb 9, 2004
200
22
Are corners good or bad as a router location?
In my experience, it doesn't matter much as long as you don't put it in richt against the corner itself.

To my surprise, my router had better reception when I placed it in the corner of my house, above the door of the meter closet, which is deeper than the rest of the wall. You'd expect a worse reception since essentially it hangs in a niche. In reality, it seems to have an enhancing effect.
 

kelub

macrumors regular
Jun 15, 2010
136
45
The 5 Ghz WiFi channels are often less crowded and it is faster but only if you are very close like in the same room or in line of sight. Else you're probably better off without it.
That's a good point. I bought my latest-gen AEBS and went about putting anything that supported 5GHz onto a separated network specifically for that. Some of my Apple TVs that were a bit further away struggled with connectivity. Airport Utility showed their signal strength as "good" to "fair." Switched them back to the 2.4GHz range, they jumped up to "excellent." Now I pretty much use the 5GHz for my iMac's. There's not enough interference (in my case) to avoid 2.4GHz "just because."
 

rui no onna

macrumors 604
Oct 25, 2013
6,881
3,133
So connecting a WiFi hotspot, repeater, or WiFi router (put in hotspot mode) via ethernet cable is much more effective. Laying the cable can be a pain but having good WiFi reception for years to come is worth it!

PS 2
The 5 Ghz WiFi channels are often less crowded and it is faster but only if you are very close like in the same room or in line of sight. Else you're probably better off without it.
Completely agree. At best, I only get 30 Mbps throughput on 2.4 GHz while I can get over 100 Mbps on 5 GHz. Unfortunately, that drops down pretty quickly with distance and obstructions. I do a lot of local syncing/copying to my tablets so I just installed a second wireless router (AP mode) connected to a gigabit switch for a dedicated 5 GHz wifi hotspot in my room. :p
 

Newtons Apple

Suspended
Mar 12, 2014
22,779
14,930
Jacksonville, Florida
Are corners good or bad as a router location?
Best location is dependant on you WiFi attenna type. Some antennas are built into the divice and can be directional while others have small external antennas when central placement in the user area would be the best. Adding some elevation can also help. People will be shocked at the difference it can make by just movong your device from one room to another.

If your device lacks power then it is most important to be located closer to where it needs to provide coverage.:apple:
 

VFC

macrumors 6502a
Feb 6, 2012
514
10
SE PA.
I use this http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0087NZ31S/ref=oh_details_o04_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 as a second wireless access point. It is one of the highest rated range extenders.

You can take the easy route (less than 3 minutes) and install it as a repeater. It has a built in touch screen with a stylus to make set up super easy. However all repeaters reduce network speed by over 50%. Some people never notice and are satisfied going this route.

If you want faster performance you can hook it up as a duplicate access point, using the same wifi name and password of your main wireless router. You need to hook it up to an Ethernet cable and configure it on a different channel. I have my main router on channel one and the Almond on channel six.

When I walk around my house I can see my Nexus 7 automatically switching between channels 1 and 6 (small up and down arrows next to the signal strength bars) depending on which access point has the stronger signal. I now have full coverage (4-5 bars) on both ends of my house on all three floors.
 
Last edited:

moonman239

macrumors 68000
Mar 27, 2009
1,525
22
Before you go shopping just make sure that your router is :

- located in a central spot in the house so that all rooms are the same distance away

- check that the router is not next to some large metal object (i.e. radiator) that will generate some signal distortion and reduce wifi range

- check that there not too many other wifi networks in your area. If so maybe try changing the channel

If the above do not dramatically improve things, then seek out a stronger router or maybe a repeater.
Even a microwave oven can cause interference.
 

Max(IT)

Suspended
Dec 8, 2009
8,633
1,640
Italy
I'm using an AirPort Extreme as primary router and an Airport express as an extender to cover all the house.
The Extreme is working on both frequencies, while the extender is working only on the 5 Ghz.
 

korthaj

macrumors newbie
Aug 27, 2013
11
0
US
I had difficulties getting good reception around the house so I went and got me two apple airport expresses (MC414LL/A). One as main the other as extend, never had a problem since and the stability is excellent with no downtime.
Highly recommend.
 

Jambalaya

macrumors 6502a
Jun 21, 2013
731
98
UK
Airport Extreme is generally better than the "free" boxes your Internet provider gives you and whilst they offer other functionality like TimeMachine it's an expensive solution. I use Powerline adapters, these cost $30-80 depending on functionality, the cheaper price is for Ethernet only the more expensive for Wifi. They work best if connected direct to power socket and not via extension leads. As I had an old Airport Express I connected that to Ethernet Powerline and created a second Wifi network at top of the house where the signal was poor. I find for my MacMini and Apple TV connecting via Ethernet/Powerline is more reliable / better / faster (as less dropouts).