How to extend my iBook's useful lifespan?

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by GanChan, Jul 17, 2008.

  1. GanChan macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2005
    #1
    My 2004-era G4 iBook, bought as a refurb a couple years ago, is still chugging away just fine, but I'd like to maximize its future usability without pouring a ridiculous amount of money into it. My thoughts so far:

    -Max out the RAM. It's just a stock unit, so the result should be a nice performance bump for not much money.

    -Put it on a ventilated stand when using at home. The iBook doesn't get blazing hot, so maybe this isn't a big deal, but the battery area sure gets warm, even when plugged in. Might make a difference over time.

    -Proper battery conditioning. I've just been letting it run down about halfway, then charging it up again as needed. I probably need a more by-the-book method.

    -I might hook it up to an external monitor at home to spare the iBook's LCD screen unneeded use, except I don;t know whether I can actually put the ibook screen to sleep while the external display keeps running....It might not make much difference anyway.

    -Don't drop it. :D

    Other things I can do to keep my iBook viable and healthy?
     
  2. Whorehay macrumors 6502a

    Whorehay

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    #2
    Mine is still running Tiger smoothly :) The steps you proposed will work, but these are pretty durable machines, although the screen is sort of dim, but hey, it's a 4-5 year old computer, don't expect it to have the brightness of my MBPs LEDs. Maybe running maintenance on the OS periodically to keep it running smoothly.. since I find some things might lag the G4 processor down. :)
     
  3. GanChan thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2005
    #3
    What kind of maintenance? Disk Utility kind of stuff?
     
  4. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #4
    I think the RAM is worth it. Note that all the iBook G4s can handle a 1GB module in their memory slot, even though the specification for the first gen iBook G4 is that it can only go up to 512MB (for a total of 640MB of memory). I bought mine with 640 back in Dec 03 and then upgraded to 1152MB (1024+128 soldered). It made a big difference for me in Tiger satisfaction.

    I personally wouldn't bother with any of the other things on your list. Running through the battery about once a month was recommended by Apple back in that generation, but I think the issue was more for people who would use their battery once every six weeks (like me). Come to think of it, I can't remember when I last used my Eee on its battery... :eek:

    If what your doing has gotten your iBook through four years, I wouldn't bother doing anything differently, although I guess that your battery is going to, most likely, die out sooner or later for better or worse.

    The rest... I guess, do what you feel comfortable with, but ultimately, why are you working so hard to make this computer last so long? You don't have to do anything special to get a few more years out of it. If you want another decade, yeah, maybe you have to do something special, but....
     
  5. GanChan thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2005
    #5
    Well, none of that really counts as "working hard" to me; I just want to practice good notebook-maintenance habits. And I have an affection for this one, so I won't just be tossing it out even when I get a new one. But until that day comes...it's RAM buyin' time!
     
  6. lasuther macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Haven, Michigan
    #6
    Max out the ram with a 1gig stick.

    If your hard drive is getting full or having issues, consider a larger and faster upgrade.

    If your battery starts acting up or has a short usage, consider getting a new battery.

    Thats about all I can think of. Just don't drop it, thats what I did to my 2004 12" iBook. But that did give me an excuse for a MacBook.
     

Share This Page