How to get a propriatary apps on an ipad?

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by Mel3, Sep 30, 2010.

  1. Mel3 macrumors newbie

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    #1
    We are totally new to Apple Application Development but we may be about to be "assimilated"  as we have client for proprietary ipad application.

    Hopefully some kind soul will save us some research time...

    1 - As we understand it all Apps for the iPad must be approved by Apple and go through their Apps store... is this true?

    2 - If so how does one get a highly proprietary custom application installed on a bunch of client machines?

    3 – We also understand that Apple wants’ a 30% cut... but if we are contracted by the client to develop a proprietary custom app for use only in their business... how is this handled?

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #2
  3. Mel3 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #3
    Thanks for the help dejo... but before we pay $300 and spend hours/days reading maybe a few more questions if you don't mind :)

    We still need to know if...

    1- we must get the app installed on the clients ipads via running them through (uploading?) the apple apps store?
    2 - is apple going to try and collect a fee for the app (30% or whatever?)
    3 - exactly how do we get the app on the devices?

    We are quite concerned about getting tangled up with a platform for which there is so much control required by the hardware & os owner... This is exactly what happened to the old IBM... and is happening now to MS. But we must research the possibilities.

    Thanks again for your (and any other) kind assistance.
     
  4. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #4
    Make sure you click the link from the page I referenced to "Compare iOS Developer Programs". That and the page I already linked to should answer 1 and 3. If not, what specifically are you confused about?

    As for #2, no. Apple does not take a 30% cut since there is no app purchasing going on within the Enterprise Program.
     
  5. (marc) macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    I'm not trying to promote illegal actions, but if the iPads are jailbroken, you can develop & deploy apps on them without paying a penny.
     
  6. Mr Kram macrumors 68000

    Mr Kram

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    #6
    true, but i wouldn't mess with JB for commercial applications. you're just looking to get sued.
     
  7. (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

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    #7
    Oh, I reread the OP. I thought they developed in-house. Since it's not in-house, I'd stay away from jailbreaking as well.

    Dejo's advice is good, the enterprise program is the right solution here.
     
  8. Mel3 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #8
    Thanks for the help guys.

    We may be back but it looks like we will try and urge the client to consider one of the upcoming Android tablets... Dell, Samsung Galaxy, etc. Android is an open system and it seems like enough mfg's are going to deploy Android systems to make the hardware more competivie... and maybe more feature rich... but we will see.

    Thanks again for the help.
     
  9. firewood macrumors 604

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    #9
    For less than 100 total devices (maybe only 50 to 70 or so, including all replacement devices and upgrades), you can use Ad Hoc deployment internally. Disadvantage is that you need to renew the certificates on every device a few times per year.

    For distribution to over 300 internal company employees in a company with a D&B rating and more, have them get an internal Enterprise app store, no Apple approval of apps required

    For between 50 and 300 devices, I suggest that a few company executives register as individual iOS developers and loan their ADC accounts to the development group. Then manage multiple Ad Hoc groups.
     
  10. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #10
    But how open? :)
     
  11. 87vert macrumors 6502

    87vert

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    #11
    Too open for a corporate world. I find it funny when people realize they need to pay for the developer program android suddenly becomes "better"

    If the company can afford a bunch of ipads I'm sure they can swing the $299 for enterprise license.
     
  12. Mel3 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #12
    dejo, your right... Verizon, etc are no different than Apple in that they try and force their customers to do it their way... or the highway...

    Fortunately in this application we will not need a cell carrier.

    87vert, the $299 fee is not, of course, an issue that is guiding any decisions about which os & hardware to use.

    firewood, thanks for the suggestion. We will suggest this to the clients IT exec's if we end up having to take another look at using the ipad.

    For the record Apple makes great products and we learned a long time ago that many (but not all) of their 'fan' base have a cult like dedication and seem to be stuck in the box. And that to us is the point… just another box (product) to consider for a particular application. Nothing more, nothing less. Then it is down to how difficult/easy it is to work with the product and the associated vendor. And if we choose an os that will be on many vendors hardware that gives us more choice… and choice is good 
     
  13. Bernard SG macrumors 65816

    Bernard SG

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    #13
    Choice is good and, at this point in time, iPad is the only tablet that offers the user some choice of applications that are relevant for business usage. iPad is also the only tablet that has a proven record of commercial sustainability.
    Dell Streak, Samsung Galaxy... all still basically vaporware.
    We think the thread-starter is potentially a troll.
     
  14. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #14
    I would say that how other end users perceive a company should have little, if any, influence on what device platform you recommend to a client. Now, how the company operates is a different story...

    "Choice is good" is a vague blanket statement that, to me, means little. It has no context. And, as revealed in the book "The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less", too much choice can be a bad thing, since it can cause consumers to become overwhelmed at having to decide. However, I'm not saying "no choice is good" either, because that also is a blanket statement. :)
     
  15. mad-dog-one macrumors 6502

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    #15
    Doesn't seem like a good corporate practice
     
  16. Mel3 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #16
    Bernard SG... does "troll" = not "assimilated" ? :) Only kidding now. Actually came here for info and you guys helped me get it. Thanks for that!

    Other devices are own the way. Even old Steve knows that 

    Dejo… When presented with “to much choice” the market has a way of narrowing things down… for better or worse.

    "Ma Bell" told us limited/controlled choice was in our best interest... back when all we had were the dial up telephone :)
     
  17. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #17
    I'd hardly say the plethora of carriers + devices + plans that are currently available have narrowed down much.

    Am I proposing only a single choice?

    I think if you were to read that book I recommended, you would learn some surprising things.
     
  18. firewood macrumors 604

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    #18
    Forget illegal. Most corporations won't do anything that might void their warrantee or AppleCare contracts, and won't do anything that might even slightly reduce the security of a device with their companies data on it.

    And if some company is cheap enough to save a penny on development certificates, they might not even pay your iPhone consulting bill after you've created the app for them. Have you thought about that?
     
  19. firewood macrumors 604

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    #20
    When did that change?!

    Finally a iOS distribution solution for companies with between 65* and 500 employees.

    (* Why 65? Because, over the course of a year, about half of the devices might end up being replaced due to warranty exchange, breakage/loss replacements, and upgrades; and if the CEO gets that shiny new 101st device as an upgrade, the company dev may get fired.)
     
  20. dejo Moderator

    dejo

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    #21
    Speaking from experience?... :)
     
  21. xStep macrumors 68000

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    #22
    Where does it say 65?
     

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