How to get to 1080P

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by Flynnstone, Sep 30, 2009.

  1. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Cold beer land
    #1
    We have reality. We can capture it with high res still cameras and HD video cameras.

    I have a 1080P 60 inch HDTV.

    I would like a AppleTV & Bluray player solution. But I can't get myself to buy a 720p AppleTV for my 1080p TV. Once Apple comes out with a 1080p AppleTV this will be a different story.
    I don't have a Bluray burner. I don't have a Bluray player yet either.
    My underatanding is that I should be able to use say FotoMagico to generate a 1080p H.264 file, get that file onto a DVD disk and play it on a Bluray player.
    Is this possible ? & relative easy/straight forward?

    Other options?
     
  2. jampat macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    #2
    What is the source material that you are burning? Unless you have 1080P source material, the video can only look worse than the original source.
     
  3. Flynnstone thread starter macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Cold beer land
    #3
    Source material is the real world.
    Mainly capturing it with a Sony miniDV camcorder & Lumix 5MP camera.
    Also scans of older photographs.
    Looking at HD video cameras.

    But trying to get a good solution on how to get it to my 1080p TV.
     
  4. gauchogolfer macrumors 603

    gauchogolfer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2005
    Location:
    American Riviera
    #4
    I believe that most HD cameras should be able to hook up to your TV and display in native 1080p format.
     
  5. xStep macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Location:
    Less lost in L.A.
    #5
    iMovie and Final Cut can produce 1080p output. FotoMagico can if you buy the Pro version for an additional $120! I find Boinx likes to charge a premium for what is now a consumer video resolution.

    Your options to get 1920x1080 resolution to your TV is simple. First you can simply hook up your computer if the TV has an HDMI, DVI (or VGA) connector and you get the right cable. Second, you can burn HD DVDs by using Toast and it's add-on Blu-Ray extension. I think that give you about 20 minutes of HD material for a single sided DVD disc. Third, you could get a Blu-Ray burner and also use Toast to make a Blu-Ray disc. Those last two require a Blu-Ray player connected to your TV. Some TVs have a USB connection for thumb drives. I'm not sure of this last one. You could try placing a QuickTime or .MP4 file on one of those if that is an option.

    Except for HDV cameras, I don't think Apple has a solution to put your HD edits back onto a camera.

    Blowing up your miniDV material to full HD will likely look terrible. You'd probably be better off keeping it half of 1080 and placing a background behind it. You could likely do this with even iMovie 09 via the picture-in-picture effect.
     
  6. Flynnstone thread starter macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Cold beer land
    #6
    I do the first now, but inconvenient and my wife has trouble with that. Too complex.

    2nd that's what I'm looking for. Have you made a HD DVD and played it on a BluRay player? Will Toast take a H.264 1080p file? What FPS?

    3rd, agree.

    I'll be in your neck of the woods at the end of October. Bellingham. Going sailing on the Zodiac. Beautiful area!
     
  7. icrude macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #7
    you will realize pretty soon that there is no straight forward answer to your question. First of all you mentioned MiniDV which is a consumer format. I have a Pro camera that will shoot 720p24 that will look sharper than any format a mini DV camera can shoot. On top of all that, MiniDV is not true progressive, well it is but it's not.....that all depends on the camera. Plus you would have to edit in the original format of your camera, and most people don't understand how to do that, plus you'd have to burn a blu-ray disc or record your project back to your camera after editing. Basically, this will get very expensive if you always want 1080P. I have some images I can show you and I bet you couldn't tell if they were 720 or 1080. Most tv isn't even 1080.

    Hope that helps!
     
  8. Flynnstone thread starter macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2003
    Location:
    Cold beer land
    #8
    I have a 1080p TV. a 60 inch Sony LCOS.
    I hooked my G5 Power Mac to it one day. Forget HD with it but ...
    I did a quick slide show from iPhoto. It was stunning!
     
  9. CaptainChunk macrumors 68020

    CaptainChunk

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2008
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #9
    Toast (I believe version 9 and above) will burn Blu-ray content to DVD if you have the BD plugin (which Roxio charges $20 for, I think). Most Blu-ray players should be compatible... Just note that you won't fit much more than about 20 minutes on a single-layer disc.

    Toast will accept H.264 files at source frame rate, but it will re-encode the video to Blu-ray standard.

    I wouldn't sweat too much over some of your material being SD. Most modern TVs have pretty decent video upscaling. It still won't be as pretty as looking at it on an older TV, but that's trade-off with modern fixed-pixel displays...

    I know of plenty of prosumer and even pro cameras that use MiniDV tapes. So, it isn't limited to JUST consumers, FYI.
     
  10. xStep macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Location:
    Less lost in L.A.
    #10
    When I said HD DVD, I wasn't talking about the now defunct HD-DVD disc format, but rather using regular DVD discs to create a Blu-Ray disc. That's right, the Blu-Ray standard allows for using regular DVD discs. The length of material is shorter though.

    See Taming the Wild Blu, part 2. Part 1 explains more about Blu-Ray data discs but should be read too. Bruce has also done some Toast tutorials under the 'Learn' menu here.

    Not having done this yet, I'm not sure what Toast will take as input. I would expect it to keep what ever frame rate you feed it too.

    Here is some others experience burning for Blu-Ray.
     

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