How to know if Netflix is playing HDR

Robertjan88

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Oct 30, 2018
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Today I received my new iPad Pro 12.9 (2018). After installing Netflix, I noticed that many movies and series have a Dolby Vision Logo.

Does this mean that they are also playing in HDR? Is there a way to check this?
 

TheRealAlex

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Sep 2, 2015
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Today I received my new iPad Pro 12.9 (2018). After installing Netflix, I noticed that many movies and series have a Dolby Vision Logo.

Does this mean that they are also playing in HDR? Is there a way to check this?
You must be paying for the $14.99 Top 4K tier of Netflix also you must have adequate bandwidth hopefully 25Mbps+
But I find that 40 is what needed to avoid buffering.
 

Robertjan88

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Oct 30, 2018
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Eyes on the screen?
Haha, why isn't there some kind of info panel or logo during playback to inform the user if the content is playing in HDR and in what resolution? I couldn't even find settings to set the streaming quality. Just the download quality.

With my Samsung TV I always know if I am playing in HDR as the backlight is automatically pushed to max. The iPad doesn't do this. Of course, the content is looking good, and I am pushing the backlight to max myself, but this is the main reason why I am unsure.

My TV doesn't support Dolby Vision (only HDR), hence the fact that I only see a Dolby Vision Logo on my iPad and no HDR logo is a bit confusing. Does the Dolby Vision logo mean that the content will also play in HDR?
 

M3Jedi77

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Jun 30, 2007
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The iPad does not play Dolby Vision, or real HDR. That will be 2019 or 2020, when it has an OLED or MicroLED screen.
 

Robertjan88

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Oct 30, 2018
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The iPad does not play Dolby Vision, or real HDR. That will be 2019 or 2020, when it has an OLED or MicroLED screen.
But it does support HDR and the screen is basically HDR600 (10bit and 600nits). You don't need OLED for HDR. E.g. the Samsung KS and Q series are one of the best 4k HDR TVs available, according to many review, due to their 1000-1500 nits.

Current OLED TVs barely make it till 1000nits, which is the minimum for HDR1000 (also known as full HDR). ;)
 
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C225

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Most OLEDs don’t get near 1000 nits, but as the blacks are better the specification for them to be classed as ultra hd premium is 600 nits.

HDR1000 is marketing made up by Samsung just like the QLED is. It’s juat what they call their good screens kinda like apple calling their screens liquid or Super Retina.
 
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Robertjan88

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Most OLEDs don’t get near 1000 nits, but as the blacks are better the specification for them to be classed as ultra hd premium is 600 nits.

HDR1000 is marketing made up by Samsung just like the QLED is. It’s juat what they call their good screens kinda like apple calling their screens liquid or Super Retina.
I agree. The fact that OLEDS aren't able to pass 1000nits yet, is for me a reason not to buy them. The other reason is of course the potential screen burn.

The fact that Samsung is still scoring more points is only due to their high nits. Once OLED tackles this, they will be the best option.

Nevertheless, in this case my question was if Dolby Vision also covers HDR. I am asking because many Netflix movies on my iPad Pro 12.9 (2018) do have a Dolby Vision logo and none HDR. :)
 

aevan

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Today I received my new iPad Pro 12.9 (2018). After installing Netflix, I noticed that many movies and series have a Dolby Vision Logo.

Does this mean that they are also playing in HDR? Is there a way to check this?
When Netflix detects a device that is HDR capable, it sends a HDR/Dolby Vision signal. HOWEVER - the fact that a device accepts the HDR signal doesn't mean much in practice. Also, the HDR effect greatly depends on the source too, I see the most effect in HDR demo videos, in regular Netflix shows it's less noticeable even on my OLED TV.

At the end of the day, the iPad has a 600nit screen with wide-color so it is semi-HDR capable. It doesn't have local dimming or peak brightness: for a true HDR experience you need a 1000 nit LCD with local dimming or an OLED with a 540 nit screen.

HDR is nice, but a good screen will display even SDR content nicely and iPad Pro has a very nice screen, so, true HDR or not, Netflix experience is good :)
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I agree. The fact that OLEDS aren't able to pass 1000nits yet, is for me a reason not to buy them. The other reason is of course the potential screen burn.
This is, basically, a misconception - don't want to get into it that much, but on every blind test in dark rooms, 800 nit OLEDs win against 1500 nit LCDs because of human perception and psychology. A 700 nit highlight sitting in perfect dark area will look perceptually brighter than a 1500 nit on a LCD, even with local dimming. Nits are like megapixels - they are deceiving. In a dark room, an OLED will look like the brightest TV on the market (for this reason, UHD Premium specification is 1000 nits peak on LCD, but 540 nit on OLED).

If you had a 1500 nit OLED, you would most likely lower the brightness on it. So, the nit thing is not a reason to avoid OLEDs. Burn-in, again, depends on what you do on your TV, but in regular content (even gaming) it's not really an issue. For Netflix and movies - it's exacly 0 issue. To use it as a computer monitor? Better go for LCD.

But, getting sidetracked here :)

1. iPad Pro has a great screen, but HDR will not be very noticeable
2. For the best HDR experience, you need an OLED screen. Even on an iPhone X, HDR looks better than on an iPad Pro. This is why Apple no longer markets iPad Pro screen as HDR, but continues to market XS screens as HDR even though both achieve the same 600 nits peak brightness.

Basically, the only LCDs that can display HDR effectively are the very high-end LCDs with FALD. Other than that, it's OLED town.
[doublepost=1543062999][/doublepost]
Current OLED TVs barely make it till 1000nits, which is the minimum for HDR1000 (also known as full HDR). ;)
Just to emphasize it further, 1000 nits is not the minimum for Ultra HD Premium (and this one is known as "full HDR"), it is the minimum for LCD screens. For OLEDs it's 540 nits, as I explained above. HDR1000 is a marketing term that Samsung uses to promote their LCD TVs, nothing else.
 
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Ries

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I agree. The fact that OLEDS aren't able to pass 1000nits yet, is for me a reason not to buy them. The other reason is of course the potential screen burn.

The fact that Samsung is still scoring more points is only due to their high nits. Once OLED tackles this, they will be the best option.

Nevertheless, in this case my question was if Dolby Vision also covers HDR. I am asking because many Netflix movies on my iPad Pro 12.9 (2018) do have a Dolby Vision logo and none HDR. :)
nits mean nothing when your contrast ratio sucks. Having "true black" reigns supreme over getting blinded and having black being gray.
 

StarShot

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aevan

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Why do I get the Dolby Vision Icon on my 11” iPad Pro when selecting some shows like Narcos but not the HDR logo like on my OLED 4K TV
Not sure if I understand the question, but maybe this helps: ok, so Dolby Vision is also high dynamic range, but it has a different set of requirements and rules and a different logo. Not every TV supports DV, so they switch to HDR10 in Netflix and show the HDR logo instead. If you have a Panasonic OLED, it doesn’t have DV. LG and Sony do and they use DV (and show its logo) in the Netflix app. Apple devices too. DV is better than HDR10 because of dynamic metadata (more optimized brightness).