How to make my app store updates small?

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by troop231, Aug 31, 2011.

  1. troop231 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    #1
    Hello, I am frustrated that all of my app user base has to update their app whenever I update just one pdf file in the app. The advantage of this app (OutdoorRules) is that everything is stored locally and doesn't require a connection to the internet to view the pdf files. Is it possible that I can do delta updates of just the changed pdf files? Submitting a new binary every time is getting frustrating and eats bandwidth! Any other ideas on how to solve this are appreciated!
     
  2. bindle macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2008
    #2
    Nope, no delta updates yet. The whole binary has to be replaced.
    I'd personally do the content updates through the app if all you're updating is a pdf. You could give the user a 'check for pdf update' button so they can update on their own when they have a network connection available.
     
  3. jnoxx macrumors 65816

    jnoxx

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2010
    Location:
    Aartselaar // Antwerp // Belgium
    #3
    With this function, you need a backend running which could eat up alot of $$.
    So afaik, I think submitting a new binary is your only chance ;) (change alot of bugs/extra's at once) instead of every tiny little thing.
     
  4. troop231 thread starter macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    #4
    Would Apple allow me to implement a check for pdf updates button? I think it could be done, sounds simple enough right? Button pressed > Connect to server and check for pdf files in the updates folder on server > if any found then initiate a download to the documents directory of the app > if none found then UIAlert: No updates found.

    Would this work? Or is my description out of whack? Thanks again!
     
  5. forum user macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2008
    #5
    Not necessarily, for example my provider charges around 6 euro for 500 Mb. That would be six copies sold per month to cover the cost of the online space. Traffic is included and I pay only for space I use. Maintenance is announced well in advance and unexpected downtime is rare.

    Just stay away from "free" offers and be prepared to invest a few bucks per month. Webspace is cheap nowadays.

    - Olaf
     
  6. jnoxx macrumors 65816

    jnoxx

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2010
    Location:
    Aartselaar // Antwerp // Belgium
    #6
    Totally doable if you have a backend :)
     
  7. troop231 thread starter macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    #7
    Well, I've been thinking that I need to register with godaddy for a website and some hosting so I can advertise my apps, I'm sure I could host the pdfs in a folder right? I'm just not sure how I would implement the code in the app.
     
  8. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #8
    Retrieve PDFs from a server using NSURLConnection.

    Start by reading the class reference doc.

    At the top of that doc you'll see a link to a Companion guide. You'll need to read that, too. In fact, you should probably read it first.

    You'll also see links to Related sample code. Use those as examples of how to use the class.


    You don't need to register a domain-name, nor use a hosting service, if all you're doing is providing downloadable files for your app. You can, but it's not necessary. Simply upload files to a storage service like S3, and put the URLs in your app. See this other thread:
    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1222160

    To avoid having to update your app when the URLs change, you can write your app so it loads one file from S3 containing a list of other URLs to download. The URL of the list doesn't change, so you can safely put that URL in your app. The contents of the list changes, but it's on S3, not built into your app. So you can change the contents of the list without updating your app on the App Store. The list can easily be in plist format.

    Before doing any of this, however, I recommend calculating what it would cost you to provide this content on S3, and compare that cost to what it costs you to have Apple host it on the App Store. If the number of files is large, or the files are large, or the number of users is large, then you could end up paying more in download fees than you take in from the app. I suggest using S3's pricing, because it's one of the less expensive file-hosting services. If the cost analysis is negative for S3, then it's unlikely to be any better from any other provider.
     
  9. (marc) macrumors 6502a

    (marc)

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2010
    Location:
    the woods
    #9
    Either that, or upload them in a public Dropbox folder or something like that. (To save money. ;))
     

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