How to Migrate MacBook Data in SSD Upgrade?

Jack_Splat

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 5, 2020
3
0
I have extensive Windows/PC experience, and ZERO Mac experience. My friend has a MacBook 7.1 and I would like to upgrade her RAM from the factory 2 Gbytes to the max of 16 Gbytes, and also upgrade her HD to an SSD.

I've watched several YouTube videos and the memory upgrade process seems very straightforward, and no different than upgrading PC/laptop memory. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I'm also interested in if there is a memory that is considered "best" for either performance, value or reliability. I buy all my computer hardware from NewEgg (US).

The SSD is what worries me. I've done exactly one SSD upgrade on my own PC, using the migration software that came with the SSD, with both the old HD and the SSD installed at the same time. I watched one YouTube video that showed a person using an external (assume USB) enclosure, but the video was so poorly produced I couldn't watch it completely.

How does one upgrade a MacBook's factory HD to an SSD, particularly the data migration? I hear these rumors about "cloud" and wonder if there isn't some way to store the old HD's data on some cloud somewhere, and download it to the SSD. Could I install both the MacBook's HD and the new SSD as secondary drives on my desktop PC and simply clone the HD to the SSD? Or what?

Also interested in recommendations for an SSD. I like the Samsung "EVO", but it's possible that the Mac community has a different set of standards and preferences. Any help appreciated, and thanks in advance.
 

Spudhead

macrumors member
Jul 23, 2013
36
5
Download carbon copy cloner.

Get an external drive, put the SSD in.

Use carbon copy cloner to clone the internal hdd image into the ssd.

Then simply open up the mac and swap the hdd for the ssd.



I always use Crucial SSD's personally.
 
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tdhurst

macrumors 601
Dec 27, 2003
4,135
250
Phoenix, AZ
Download carbon copy cloner.

Get an external drive, put the SSD in.

Use carbon copy cloner to clone the internal hdd image into the ssd.

Then simply open up the mac and swap the hdd for the ssd.



I always use Crucial SSD's personally.
This is exactly what I've done, multiple times. iFixit often has tool and enclosure packages, and I think sometimes Crucial offers rubber external exclosures, for this very thing.

Super easy, though you will likely have to format the SSD first using Disk Utility.
 

Jack_Splat

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 5, 2020
3
0
Download carbon copy cloner.

Get an external drive, put the SSD in.

Use carbon copy cloner to clone the internal hdd image into the ssd.

Then simply open up the mac and swap the hdd for the ssd.



I always use Crucial SSD's personally.
Thanks for the fast and informative reply. I've noticed that Crucial seems to be a favorite for Macs. Is there any technical reason for this (specs, etc...)?

I assume that I could also clone the HD to the SSD on my desktop, or does this have to be done on the Mac using Mac software? If so, I'll have to buy an external drive.

Also, I found an enclosure that fits where the optical drive would go. You load the SSD/HD into the enclosure, use it to replace the optical drive and supposedly you can have both an HD and an SSD. It's $20.00. Has anyone used this? I can see this being useful for both doing the SSD migration and also having the ability to run to HD's/SSD's on the Mac.
 

tdhurst

macrumors 601
Dec 27, 2003
4,135
250
Phoenix, AZ
Thanks for the fast and informative reply. I've noticed that Crucial seems to be a favorite for Macs. Is there any technical reason for this (specs, etc...)?

I assume that I could also clone the HD to the SSD on my desktop, or does this have to be done on the Mac using Mac software? If so, I'll have to buy an external drive.

Also, I found an enclosure that fits where the optical drive would go. You load the SSD/HD into the enclosure, use it to replace the optical drive and supposedly you can have both an HD and an SSD. It's $20.00. Has anyone used this? I can see this being useful for both doing the SSD migration and also having the ability to run to HD's/SSD's on the Mac.
I wouldn’t trust PC software to clone a Mac drive and vice verse, mainly because of drive formatting issues. Apple uses Afps (or sone acronym close to that) for SSDs that PCs don’t likely have access to.
For the external enclosure used for formatting/cloning, I used a rubber option that was something like $15. Great for simple, short term use.
Yes on the internal enclosure replacing the optical drive, but I would put the SSD where the HDD was originally and the HDD in the optical drive slot to make sure you are using the fastest possible bus (my photog buddy has a 2014 MBP with a 256/one tb set up this way, with apps on the ssd and Datw on the HDD using aliases via the hone folder, works great).
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Crucial seems to have a lower fail rate than other manufacturers with great customer service.
 

Jack_Splat

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 5, 2020
3
0
Crucial seems to have a lower fail rate than other manufacturers with great customer service.
Do you have a specific model # to recommend? She currently has a 256 Gbyte mechanical HD, says she doesn't need any more storage than that, and cost is an issue. Since it's my first (and probably only) foray into Macs, I want to avoid any problems with compatibility, etc... Safest is best.
 

tdhurst

macrumors 601
Dec 27, 2003
4,135
250
Phoenix, AZ
Do you have a specific model # to recommend? She currently has a 256 Gbyte mechanical HD, says she doesn't need any more storage than that, and cost is an issue. Since it's my first (and probably only) foray into Macs, I want to avoid any problems with compatibility, etc... Safest is best.
No, Crucial has a nice tool on their site that will recommend the best product based on Mac model.
Quite honestly, I've been using their SSDs for five (maybe seven?) years now and have yet to have one fail, including my upgraded Mac mini "server" that's never been turned off.