How to network a Mac to a Windows 7/8 desktop?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by minvoyager, Mar 19, 2015.

  1. minvoyager macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 16, 2014
    #1
    There's a professional software package installed on a standalone (non-MS exchange) Windows 7,8 desktop.

    I want to use my Mac notebook to network to that desktop in order to access the professional software package. The software package is used via a browser, so I assume that once I achieve the network connection, I can used the Mac's browser to operate the software that's on the Windows computer. The network connection has to be via internet, to let me access the software even from overseas via internet.

    It was told the Mac can network to the Windows desktop computer by opening the firewall for HTTP/port 80.

    I'm unfamiliar with connecting a Mac to a Windows computer for this purpose.

    Can someone either tell me how, or point me to whether I can get information on how to get this done?

    The software resides on the Windows 7/8 desktop computer, and I want to connect the Mac (via internet) to the Windows computer to make use of the software.

    (That's permitted under the software package's licence).
     
  2. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    #2
    Your Mac automatically discovers any Windows servers on your LAN. It is my understanding that the default network stack in OS X 10.10 Yosemite is SMP licensed by Apple from Microsoft. Of course, you will need proper credentials to access content on each server.

    It might be helpful if you explain exactly why you are having issues accessing your Windows network volumes.
     
  3. BrianBaughn macrumors 601

    BrianBaughn

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    Baltimore, Maryland
    #3
    Since you haven't told us what the software is we'll have to speculate.

    One thing I'll add is that the "professional software package" on the Windows computer may have Windows-related dependencies, no matter how it's accessed.

    You could just run Teamviewer, or another remote access application, on both computers and access the Windows desktop on your Mac.
     
  4. minvoyager thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 16, 2014
    #4
    The two scenarios are: (1) PC and Mac are in an office where the connection between the computers is via internet, and (2) where the Mac is used overseas when traveling, and has to log back into the PC in the office to read the software package.

    I haven't yet purchased the software package, and am investigating whether it will meet my needs, i.e. being able to log into the software on the office PC desktop when I am overseas traveling with my Mac notebook.

    In that sense, I'm not having "issue" - I'm investigating whether the setup will achieve my aims, which is to install the software package on the Windows desktop, and to be able to access it via internet using the Mac notebook.

    Whether the Mac notebook is in the same office or being used while traveling, it doesn't seem to make a difference since the aim is to connect via internet.

    I am not keen on Team Viewer since that seems to involve taking over the host computer. Instead, I'm wanting the Mac to connect to the Windows desktop so I can use the Mac's browser to run the software.

    The software vendor said the Mac can network to the Windows desktop computer by opening the firewall for HTTP/port 80. But, my experience is limited to standalone Macs and PC's, and hence I don't understand how to implement that advice from the software vendor, and whether that can be achieved solely by an internet connection (i.e. not a local area network (LAN) that uses cables). It has to be solely by internet, since it has to work while I am overseas.

    No, the vendor said the software runs entirely in a browser. The software has to be installed on a PC, but apparently can be read using a browser.
     
  5. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #5
    Frankly, just say what the package is, otherwise you are wasting everyone's time. Yours will also be wasted when you get advice that then can't be followed.

    IF this is allowed by the software licence then up and state what that package is. If that is prescribed by the software licence then get the vendor/developer to support their own package properly as clearly you don't have enough information to make a buying decision.

    "Connect via the internet" is not a single "thing", there are multiple ways and methods, not all are possible in any scenario.
     
  6. shaunp macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    #6
    Needs to be running as a service

    If you have file sharing enabled on the PC you will be able to access files on that PC so long as the permissions, etc are correct - both the share permission and file permissions.

    However, this won't allow you to run an application that's on the PC. As this application you are talking about is a web-based app, if Windows can run that as a service you could then point the browser on your Mac to the IP address of your PC (with the right port number, etc for the application) and access it that way. That's if it runs as a service, if not you won't be able to use this route.

    The alternative is to remote desktop to the PC and run the application. Download the Microsoft remote desktop application, then enable remote desktop access on the PC.

    And also just say what the package is, there may be a better way of doing this.
     
  7. minvoyager thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 16, 2014
    #7
    The software is a legal practice management software for running the cases and deadlines of a law firm, as well as client list.

    On the Windows computer, it runs in the browser.
     
  8. MisterMe macrumors G4

    MisterMe

    Joined:
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    USA
    #8
    Your software sounds like a Java application. If this is the case, then you need to download and install Java from the Oracle website. I believe that Safari will prompt you to do this if you open the application file in browser.
     
  9. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #9
    So, it runs in a browser but the data and app are on the Windows PC?

    As someone else suggested, make the sales team for the vendor do their job. Tell them what you want to do and let them sell the capability to you. Only they will know if it's possible and how it would be done.

    I'll tell you this though - at the very least you'll need to open a port on the office internet connection to allow the incoming request, unless the Mac connects back to the main office with some kind of VPN.
     
  10. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #10
    Jeez - just name the package. You clearly dont have the information anyone needs, nor know enough about the package.

    See above? More wasted time by people guessing.

    "Runs in a browser" isnt enough to advise, no matter how many times you repeat it.
     
  11. takeshi74 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    #11
    +1 Name the app or have the vendor clarify for you. We can go round and round like this and never get you the answer you need. We need the specifics and what you're supplying is far too vague in order for anyone to assist.

    It's not just a matter of the two machines but the firewall and router and some sort of dynamic DNS solution unless you have a static IP. Given your other posts it sounds like this is all beyond your capabilities and you need to find someone who knows what they're doing to assist you with this.
     
  12. simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

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    Jan 3, 2014
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    #12
    Oh and if this is true, ie you are going to run a law firm's case load on a single PC - very bad idea.

    Unless you are hiding the fact that the law firm is a single practitioner starting up from scratch - they need some proper advise otherwise this will end in expensive tears at the "law firm".

    ----------

    Ah - YOU are the law firm? Imagine if I portrayed a question in a legal forum in such vague terms, you would probably suggest I take professional legal advice as I know nothing about the law?

    I suggest you do the same and engage a local professional to assist.
     
  13. minvoyager thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 16, 2014
    #13


    The collective advise indicates to me this is a more complex issue that I thought, not readily achievable by standard instructions for networking Macs to PC's. Hence, I will seek the advice of an I.T. consultant.

    simonsi, it should be evident to you that large law firms, with in-house I.T. staff, would not need to ask a networking question on a macrumors forum.

    If I asked how to network a Mac to a PC, that's a technical question, and I would have thought that the technical issues do not change whether I am a solo practitioner or a large international law firm. So it's rather scathing of you to take glee at deducing that the OP could be a solo practitioner, with limited I.T. resources and experience. Many law firms on the Register comprise solo practitioners, and they start from scratch, and grow from there.

    I don't feel at liberty to name the software package, since it is a highly specialised package. The comments above indicate to me that the issue is more complex than I imagined, and certainly beyond my level of experience, and hence I'll seek the advice of an I.T. consultant.

    Having a low level of I.T. experience is not a crime, by the way. My lack of experience meant I did not realise that this networking issue was beyond my capabilities.
     
  14. simonsi, Mar 22, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015

    simonsi macrumors 601

    simonsi

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2014
    Location:
    Auckland
    #14
    No but equally some large revenue law firms outsource such support, not always to people with all the necessary skills...

    No its not a crime, however being unecessarily vague when asking for assistance just wastes everyone's time - and doesn't get you any quality of response.

    The danger here is you ask a vague question, get some advise which may or may not be accurate because it is based on assumptions you don't understand, therefore can't take into account, then follow it inappropriately and it causes harm to someone's business.

    Sorry if I came across as blunt but frankly I'd rather that than we become best buddies and you take a hit...
     
  15. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #15
    The question isn't so much about networking a Mac to Windows 7/8. That's easy, if you understand share permissions and the basics of network connectivity.

    The question is more "can this unnamed application function in this way?". The answer to that, only the developer of the application can tell you. The developer wrote the application, not us. The developer supports the application, not us.
     

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