How to properly store an old MacBook Pro?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Dark Void, Jul 15, 2015.

  1. Dark Void macrumors 68030

    Dark Void

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Cimmerian End
    #1
    Hi MacRumors,

    I have a 2010 13'' MacBook Pro that I would like to retire and store away for an extended period of time (1-2 years or more) before possibly using it again as a novelty. I was wondering what the best way to go about this would be to keep it in the best health during that time. I would rather just hang on to it than sell it - I don't think the ~$300-350 I could get for it is worth it compared to how sentimental it is. Plus, it seems like robbery to hand someone a "Pro" grade notebook for $300 with an aluminum build and bells/whistles like a backlit keyboard, even if the hardware is dated in current times.

    I know that I will have to focus on temperature - I most likely plan on storing it in a drawer. My main question is, would it make a difference to disconnect the battery and store that away separately? I also plan on salvaging the SSD and RAM for use in other computers. I plan on leaving the SATA connector for the HDD/SSD just sitting there with no drive connected, and the RAM slots empty as well.

    Right now, I have it on a shelf with a few books on top of it and I figure that isn't exactly ideal, but I could just be obsessive about it.

    My main concern is what to do with the battery - leave it connected, disconnect it but leave it in the chassis, or remove it and store it away separately? Does it even have potential to bulge or leak overtime when it has not been operating? My guess is no as long as it is stored away in an acceptable temperature, but I'd like to hear opinions on the matter first.

    Thanks very much to anyone who takes the time to reply.
     
  2. ApolloBoy macrumors 6502a

    ApolloBoy

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2015
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #2
    I would just stick it in a sleeve or bag and put it away. The battery should be perfectly fine.
     
  3. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #3
    Charge the battery to 40% remove and store in a cool dry place that dosnt suffer massive temperature variations. That is the best method for storing the battery.

    obviously I've said remove as its best policy. Think of it this way. If the battery decided to expand its going to burst your MacBook open.
     
  4. Dark Void thread starter macrumors 68030

    Dark Void

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
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    #5
    This is what I am hoping but there seems to be a lot of information and suggestions during my searching that suggest otherwise unfortunately. I don't know if it is being overly obsessive or not, though. Thanks very much for your reply.

    This seems rather specific so I am going to assume you are speaking from experience? I do have a few anti-static bags left over from a teardown that I did recently, would you suggest storing the battery in one of those before putting it away? Thanks for your reply.

    Thanks very much. I have of course been doing my own searching but what I am hoping for in this thread is maybe someone can speak from experience - possibly they have stored a computer/components for a long period of time before and can speak towards how to properly do so or whether or not it truly matters. This is my first time doing so, and it is with a machine that I care about.
     
  5. Gav2k, Jul 16, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2015

    Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #6
    The 40% rule is an industry standard that's where that comes from. It puts enough charge in the battery without the risk of it becoming damaged.

    As for the storage you don't need an anti static bag that is a choice for you to make. Having stored my old 3G and 3GS in this manner I can say it works. My 2g however decided that it was going to expand and caused fatal damage to the device hence my recommendation to remove.

    Batteries are based on volatile technology that for no apparent reason can degrade rapidly. I would never recommend storing batteries in devices unless your hands are tied.
     
  6. mlts22 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    #7
    I'd pull the battery regardless. I have had a battery expand and nearly burst out of my Macbook, so better safe than sorry.
     
  7. Falcon9 macrumors member

    Falcon9

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    Jun 17, 2015
    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    #8
    When our family bought an iMac back in 2013; we basically stopped using our previous shared computer (2006 White Macbook). It basically sat untouched for a few months, and when I went to power it on the battery was totally dead (like will not hold ANY charge). The computer still works fine (to this day it even still gets used once in a while), but it now can only operate when plugged in to the wall.
     
  8. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #9
    This happens when a battery is stored with to little a charge or when it's stored for to long without being recharged. Once the battery falls below a nominal value it becomes unchargable.
     
  9. ssls6 macrumors 6502a

    ssls6

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    #10
    I would charge the battery around 80% and then remove it. I would then keep the battery in a cool dry place. As long as the battery is connected to the logic board, small current leakage will happen. A disconnect battery will also leak down but it takes 10x+ longer.
     
  10. Falcon9 macrumors member

    Falcon9

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    Jun 17, 2015
    Location:
    Eastern Canada
    #11
    Ah... Dang! Could have easily been avoided then. Guess I leaned something new today.
     
  11. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

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    Jul 24, 2009
    #12
    80% could damage the battery depleting it's total storage capacity in the future. The only time a battery should be charged to 80% is when it's going to be used on a regular basis
     
  12. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

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    Jul 24, 2009
    #13
    We learn every day part of being human. Good site for you ... http://batteryuniversity.com
     
  13. ssls6 macrumors 6502a

    ssls6

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    Feb 7, 2013
    #14
    Yeah but it's a trade off between having it go to zero during storage and starting a bit too high. Having it sit at zero is a far bigger problem.
     
  14. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #15
    Figures for a new battery.

    If you were to store a battery at 20'c with 40% charge for a year then charge it to use it you would regain 96% plus of the original capacity.

    If you were to charge it to 100% and store at the same temp and period of time you'd be looking at 80% usable capacity.

    Obviously these figures vary depending on temperature but at 80% your service indicator would be showing on a Mac. Obviously storing a battery that's used offers lower figures.
     
  15. ssls6 macrumors 6502a

    ssls6

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    #16
    Good info. So a 40% battery would retain it's charge over a year?
     
  16. Gav2k macrumors G3

    Gav2k

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    #17
    It'll still discharge at 1-5% per month depending on temperature. This cannot be avoided. Batteries are tricky things. You can keep an eye on it with a multimeter. Personally I'd check the battery every 4 months charge and rest it again.
     
  17. Dark Void thread starter macrumors 68030

    Dark Void

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Cimmerian End
    #18
    Thanks for all of the replies everyone - at this point I plan to remove the battery and store it in an anti-static bag until I plan to use it again. Without a hard drive in the machine, I really don't have much of a way to drain the battery (it is currently at ~90% according to the physical gauge on the side of the laptop) apart from leaving it on the blinking question mark folder display for hours and hours.

    Apart from that, I then plan to just store the chassis (and remaining internal components) in a drawer. I don't think it would be worth buying some sort of sleeve just to store it away, and can't see the benefit in wrapping it up in another manner.
     

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