How to protect software on classroom iMacs?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by unregbaron, Sep 23, 2011.

  1. unregbaron macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #1
    Hi

    Can anyone help?

    I want to install software on some iMacs like adobe creative suite but how can I stop someone copying these over to a memory stick and walking off with it?

    Thanks
     
  2. TheBlankPage, Sep 23, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2011

    TheBlankPage macrumors newbie

    TheBlankPage

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    Aug 16, 2011
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    #2
    Device Filter Mac?

    Though Adobe's DRM system for its CS suite should keep most from "walking away with it", you could look at using a program like Device Filter Mac (which was sold by Faronics). It allowed you to block I/O access in various ways (USB, FireWire, Ethernet, etc.) and log which users were trying to access which ports.

    They don't directly sell the product anymore, I don't think, but you may still be able to get a copy - if this sort of desktop intrusion protection would work in your situation.
     
  3. blatopilot macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2011
    #3
    You could try enabling parental controls. Make yourself admin and create a separate guest or other account.

    I know you can stop access to programs, but you could also probably stop access to the folders. It's quite easy to do. You just add the folder you don't want a particular account to be able to access. If its a classroom, you probably don't want them set up as admin anyway.
     
  4. unregbaron thread starter macrumors regular

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    Oct 20, 2002
    #4
    Thanks for these tips - will let you know progress..
     
  5. AdrianK macrumors 68020

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    Feb 19, 2011
    #5
    Just out of sheer curiosity, why are you so interested in protecting Adobe's interests?

    Yup, I can't run CS5 on my Snow Leopard partition from my Lion partition because of this.
     
  6. CylonGlitch macrumors 68030

    CylonGlitch

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    #6
    Because, maybe, it's the right thing to do? Yes, they have DRM on it, and that should stop them. But what about other applications? I get the impression is that he doesn't want to be seen as giving out applications that were not legally purchased. And that's the right thing to do.
     
  7. interrobang macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    #7
    You're not giving them out. You're using them according to (presumably) the license you were granted by the vendor. That license does not require you to take any special protective measures. So long as you're not leaving the original media or serial numbers out where anyone can find them, you're doing all that's required of you.

    If some student decides to pirate them, then it's the student that's in the wrong, not you.
     
  8. pirateyarrr macrumors regular

    pirateyarrr

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    Dec 8, 2009
    #8
    Jeez, if some kid decides to copy Adobe Creative Suite and is smart enough to circumvent the DRM, he's easily smart enough to just download CS5 from a torrent site anyway, and that copy will either already be DRM-proof or will include detailed instructions on how to keep the app from phoning home to Adobe.

    This is a classic case of a clueless adult being totally focused on the wrong thing in a misguided attempt to try to be an overzealous drone for a corporation. So what if a kid does take CS home and installs it? Do you think if you prevent this (a laughable idea anyway) that he's going to buy it for $700-odd instead? Wouldn't you rather have him working with software at home instead of going out and smashing windows for fun? I'd think I'd want to encourage any creative impulse a kid has, rather than be the software police for no good purpose whatsoever. Time to look the other way on that one.
     
  9. jeffwingo macrumors newbie

    jeffwingo

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    Jun 29, 2007
    #9
    I would more concerned about what kids put on the computers than what they take off. :rolleyes:
     
  10. Jethryn Freyman macrumors 68020

    Jethryn Freyman

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    Australia
    #10
    Ironically, the pirates with the cracked version of CS5 do not have this trouble, only the legitimate users do...
     
  11. CylonGlitch macrumors 68030

    CylonGlitch

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    #11
    Legit users who applies the crack to their legit copy don't have this problem either :D
     
  12. pirateyarrr macrumors regular

    pirateyarrr

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    Dec 8, 2009
    #12
    That's nice that Adobe makes their paying customers have to apply a supposedly illegal crack to make their software function the way it does for the pirates right out of the box.
     
  13. CylonGlitch macrumors 68030

    CylonGlitch

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    #13
    Exactly why I do what I can to find alternatives to their applications. :(
     
  14. pirateyarrr macrumors regular

    pirateyarrr

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    Dec 8, 2009
    #14
    That IS a dilemma. Since they do make a darned fine product in Photoshop, should we shun Adobe products just because of their horrendous DRM practices? Or should one just sidestep the DRM entirely by downloading the thing?

    I would have no moral qualms about the latter, as long as I wasn't making money directly by using their software. After all, it's not like I would pay for the software anyway ($600??? please), even if there was no chance of me installing it for free. I would just use an alternative, and who knows, maybe there are alternatives out there that would serve my purposes just as well.
     

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