How to protect video from screen captures?

macaddict23

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 20, 2006
382
0
MacVille, USA
I popped in a DVD in my iMac running 10.6.8, and when I tried taking a screen capture (Command+Shift+X) and with SnapzPro, all I got was a checkered screen. It must be a DRM/Copyright feature.

I plan on doing a video, and I would like to implement this feature! Is it built in the latest version of FCP?

Thanks!
 

Dave Braine

macrumors 68040
Mar 19, 2008
3,623
214
Warrington, UK
It must be a DRM/Copyright feature.
It is when using Apple's DVD Player, even with home made dvds from iMovie. I doubt that you can do it yourself for a movie, as I believe that the restriction is built-in to DVDPlayer rather than the dvd.
 

ytk

macrumors regular
Jul 8, 2010
226
9
It's a function of Apple's DVD player; nothing at all to do with the DVD itself. Open up the DVD in VLC and you'll have no problem taking a screenshot.
 

Boyd01

Moderator
Staff member
Feb 21, 2012
4,400
1,983
New Jersey Pine Barrens
On my old MBP (running MacOSX 10.5.8) I have a program called SnapNDrag that lets me take screenshots of commercial DVD's. Maybe 10.6 has stronger DRM? Have never tried it on my MBA with 10.7 since I don't watch DVD's on it. :)
 

DisMyMac

macrumors 65816
Sep 30, 2009
1,087
11
So your reaction was, "Damn, I can't do what I want with something I own. How can I hurt others this way?"
 

spacepower7

macrumors 68000
May 6, 2004
1,509
1
It's a function of Apple's DVD player; nothing at all to do with the DVD itself. Open up the DVD in VLC and you'll have no problem taking a screenshot.
It's a function that all legal MPEG-2 DVD players are required to implement. VLC operates in grey legal areas, that is why it can do this. It also depends where the user lives in the world, and what laws apply.

It's locked into the disc too, VLC ignores these disc instructions.

I know from experience, I was paid $700 in 2002 to transfer 2 VHS tapes to DVD-R (alot of work back then compared to now) so that an architect could take screenshots to scale and build historical models for a city in California. The only good historical footage was in 2 Hollywood Movies, and dealing with lawyers would have been way too expensive for this project.
 

nateo200

macrumors 68030
Feb 4, 2009
2,857
6
Northern District NY
It's a function that all legal MPEG-2 DVD players are required to implement. VLC operates in grey legal areas, that is why it can do this. It also depends where the user lives in the world, and what laws apply.

It's locked into the disc too, VLC ignores these disc instructions.

I know from experience, I was paid $700 in 2002 to transfer 2 VHS tapes to DVD-R (alot of work back then compared to now) so that an architect could take screenshots to scale and build historical models for a city in California. The only good historical footage was in 2 Hollywood Movies, and dealing with lawyers would have been way too expensive for this project.
Wow....current DRM crap is just well...crap..
 

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