How to set-up / inititialize new HD?

alexf

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Apr 2, 2004
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Planet Earth
Hi Everyone,

I just finished installing a 2nd hard drive on my Power Mac G5.

When I turned on the computer, a message came up stating that the hard drive is not recognized and needed to be formatted or initialized, then disappeared. No icon is now showing up.

What should I do?

Thanks for any advice.
 

alexf

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Apr 2, 2004
648
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Planet Earth
PlaceofDis said:
can you see the drive in disk utility?
Yes, I can.

However, I just realized that I did not do any "jumpering" to the drive before I put it in - in fact, I did not even know what "jumpering" was until I just read about it... The HD installation instructions for my G5 make no mention of it!

I just want to use this 2nd drive as one would use an external drive - i.e. for storage of large media files. How should I jumper the drive?
 

diamond geezer

macrumors regular
Jan 26, 2004
156
0
You wont see the hard drive on the desktop, until you've used the Disk Utility for initialise it.

You shouldn't need to jumper the drive for it to work, it's on a seperate bus to the other drive.
 

alexf

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Apr 2, 2004
648
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Planet Earth
Thanks, Diamond Geezer (Nice name, BTW :) )

So if everything seems to be working OK after initialization I won't need to open up my Mac again and play with the jumper settings (which I didn't touch before)?
 

alexf

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Apr 2, 2004
648
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Planet Earth
I cannot find any option to "initialize" the new disk in Disk Utility, so I chose "erase" instead... is this correct?

Also, which format should I choose? (e.g. Mac OS Extended, Mac OS Extended (Journaled), etc.)
 

pigbat

macrumors regular
Jan 18, 2005
219
0
alexf said:
I cannot find any option to "initialize" the new disk in Disk Utility, so I chose "erase" instead... is this correct?

Also, which format should I choose? (e.g. Mac OS Extended, Mac OS Extended (Journaled), etc.)

I prefer the Journaled filesystem but I'd be interested to hear others weigh in on this one.
 

alexf

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Apr 2, 2004
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Planet Earth
Was I correct to "erase" the new hard drive? Why was there no "initialize" option?

BTW, what is the advantage / disadvantage of Journaled?
 

Mechcozmo

macrumors 603
Jul 17, 2004
5,215
2
You need to initialize it so that there is a file system on the drive that enables you to store family videos, music, etc. on it.

In Disk Utility, choose Erase. Then choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled). This is HFS+ Journaled, AKA, Panther's default. It is readable by OS 8.6 and up.

History lesson!

MFS was Macintosh File System, used by System 1.0 and 1.1. Used also in 2.0
HFS replaced MFS. Stood for Hierarchical File System. This meant that folders were natively supported instead of just being remembered where everything went. HFS lasted through System 7
HFS+ was just an upgrade to HFS, so that it would remain viable for larger hard drives.
Journaling is something new in Panther that allows you to recover better after a crash. I've never had to try it out, so I can't really help you there, but I do know that it works backwards with any other HFS+ file system.

Right, so now you know your file systems.

Jumpers tell the drive and the computer where it is on the cable. Used only on Parallel ATA cables, NOT SATA (Serial ATA) which your G5 uses. SATA has one drive per bus. Simple. PATA had two, so you needed a jumper telling the drive if it was the master or the slave on the bus (1st or 2nd).

Just use Disk Utility, Erase the new drive, and voíla! New drive!
 

alexf

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Apr 2, 2004
648
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Planet Earth
Thanks Mechcozmo for the clarifying comments.

So essentially you are saying that "erasing" the disk is in fact the same as initializing, or...? In OS 9 there was I believe also an "initialize" option. Why did they do away with that?
 

Mechcozmo

macrumors 603
Jul 17, 2004
5,215
2
alexf said:
Thanks Mechcozmo for the clarifying comments.

So essentially you are saying that "erasing" the disk is in fact the same as initializing, or...? In OS 9 there was I believe also an "initialize" option. Why did they do away with that?
Erase, initialize, whats the difference? All the data goes bye-bye anyway....
 
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