How to work out the angles in 2V domes?

Discussion in 'Design and Graphics' started by NStocks, Nov 13, 2009.

  1. NStocks macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #1
    Hi,

    Sorry if I'm posting in the wrong thread, but it's for a design project :p

    I have made a 2V dome out of cardboard and up until now I've not needed to know the angles of each triangle.

    I'm now trying to make it out of wood so that I can cast a mould, but obviously wood won't bend like cardboard does so I need to know the angles of the dome elements.

    I've searched on google but it's not very clear how you work it out.

    The Isosceles triangles is : Longer side 92.7mm and the shorter 81.97mm

    The equilateral triangle is 92.7mm on all edges.

    I realise this is somewhat specialised but I thought I'd give it a try... you never know !

    Thank you
     
  2. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #3
    Yeah, I saw that earlier thanks. I have just re-created part of the cardboard model and laid the wood onto that. It's looking fairly good so far !

    Nathan
     
  3. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #4
    Well, here it is. The picture doesn't quite show the finish that I achieved... which is a very smooth surface; 3 coats of paint and a lot of sanding!

    My tutor was also pleased with it so i expect a good grade :D

    Nathan
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Designer Dale macrumors 68040

    Designer Dale

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Location:
    Folding space
    #5
    Outstanding! I was hoping to see the end product of your work. Very nice.

    Dale
     
  5. NStocks thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Location:
    England
    #6
    Thank You !

    I'm experimenting with other materials such as aluminium and plastics too, but these are for different models. I can't say how much I enjoy model-making, it's far more satisfying that sketches and I can alter the designs to take on new features which is what design is all about. I'm also becoming a little more familiar with CAD which will be heavily required in the next project.

    Nathan
     

Share This Page