How's Apple's return policy?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by Wolfpup, Aug 2, 2007.

  1. Wolfpup macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    #1
    I know you get 14 days or whatever to return systems, as long as the system was a default config, but...

    -does Apple hassle you about it? Or is it simple to do?
    -do external items count as a "modification" (like if you configure it with an external modem, Applecare, and in the Macbook's case, a DVI adapter)?
    -this last one I could probably search for, but anyone know if there's a restocking fee?

    I've been on here asking about this junk forever, and I'm sorry about that, but I'm so scared to drop over $2000 on something I'm not sure about. All the MBP stories of bad audio, electricity on the case, etc...
     
  2. iBookG4user macrumors 604

    iBookG4user

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #2
    You should be able to return it hassle free. I don't believe that external items count as a modification, although I'm not absolutely certain. And yes there is a 10% restocking fee. Don't worry about spending the money on a MacBook Pro, a VERY low percentage have problems, there are over 100,000 members on this forum, you should expect to see a lot of threads on problems. But that also means that there's many more people who are content and happy with their MacBook Pro, mine has no problems and I got a rev A MacBook Pro.
     
  3. Tallest Skil macrumors P6

    Tallest Skil

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2006
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #3
    Apple's better about bending their own rules than most companies. Last year, when new iMacs weren't announced at WWDC, we went ahead and bought a Core Duo iMac. I kept all of the packaging down to the twist ties. In exactly one month, the Core 2s came out. My mom decided to make the swap (thank you education discount!), and I e-mailed Apple telling them of my plight (twist ties and all). A few days later, they e-mailed back and said, "While we do not usually make returns outside this period, in your case we have made an exception." We got our Core 2, Target Disk Mode'D the Core Duo, and sent it back. Apple's great about returns. Just keep the twist ties. For real.

    Edit: I re-read it and discovered that it makes for a kick-awesome slogan. "Just keep the twist ties." Apple Returns should use it as their underlying policy.
     
  4. ClassicBean macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2004
    Location:
    Torontoland
    #4
    I returned my 40 GB Apple TV after they announced the 160GB. It had only been about 8 days so I was within the 14-day period.

    The guy on the phone told me that there was a restocking fee but they usually wave it due to my intent to buy another product.

    This was at the Yorkdale Apple Store in Toronto.

    So I get there, and I told the cashier that they said they'd wave the restocking fee. She said ok. Then the manager tells me, "Ya know, there's a restocking fee."

    I told him that the guy on the phone said they'd wave it. He said, "Who was that?"

    I said, "I have no idea."

    Anyway, they agreed to wave it. Had they not, I would have thrown a fit, primarily since I had bought 3 laptops from the store in the last 6 months.
     
  5. mr_matalino macrumors 6502a

    mr_matalino

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    #5
    I think for an open box (for a default config) it's 10% or 15% restocking fee. For unopened, I think its 14 days no fee.
     
  6. Wolfpup thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    #6
    Would that be the same situation online? (I don't have a local store.)

    On top of everything else, now I'm being told Apple's laptops can't run the CPUs at full blast all the time-something any computer of mine HAS to do for Folding @ Home.
     
  7. crazzyeddie macrumors 68030

    crazzyeddie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    #7
    If your machine has a defect (bad audio, etc...) then you can exchange it in-store for a new one with no restocking fee (provided you bought it in the store).

    If it doesn't run your F@H like you want it to (too slow, or whatever), then too bad. You pay the restocking fee.

    However, I have run F@H on my MBP and it will run both cores at full power without an issue.
     
  8. Wolfpup thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    #8
    Oh good, that's what I wanted to know. Does it cause the fans to ramp up? Or anything too weird? Because I will be running Folding @ Home full blast on any computer I buy.

    (And I have to buy online, no one locally sells any Apple systems.)
     
  9. carfac macrumors 65816

    carfac

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    #9
    It is not allways so rosey with Apple. I once bought a 17" iMac- my first mac ever. Two days later, I decided that 17 was too small, and I wanted the twenty. I had all the twist ties and everything... and thought it would be a matter of paying the difference for the upgrade. This was my first experience with Apple, so I did not know about their absurd restock fees.

    I took it in, and asked to upgrade, and they were insistent on the restock fee, even to buy a bigger/better unit. Apple lost the sale, and ultimately had top refund the restock fee, too.... but it was a lot of work on my part to get that.

    So I would recommend always buying from a place with more realistic/real world return policies- Apple can be Nazis sometimes. Their stores customer service and unwillingness to make a simple adjustment to make a sale left a bad taste in my mouth, and because of this experience I will always avoid the A-store for any purchase.
     
  10. krunk macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2004
    #10
    They're tyrants. By default config they mean you can't change *anything*. No added ram, nothing. nada.

    If you do, there is a zero return policy. I bought a iBook and then had buyer's remorse. Called them right back cause I wanted to upgrade to a Powerbook.

    I spent a good bit of time on the phone with them trying to convince them to let me spend more money at their store. They weren't hearing it. I'd added bluetooth to my iBook. And it was a done deal.

    I'd say be very careful with clicking buttons. Once Apple has your money, it's impossible to get it back....even to spend more.

    QFT
     
  11. neven macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #11
    Except in the case of the posters above you who did just that, right?

    Policies that are at the manager's discretion are at their discretion. Some managers will do it, others won't. It depends on the product, on how you approach them, on how the store is doing at the moment, on how generous the manager is feeling that day. There's no way for you to guess, before going in, if they'll waive the advertised restocking fee you agreed to at the time of purchase or not, so just ask. What have you got to lose?
     
  12. Wolfpup thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    #12
    How does all this apply to the Apple.com store though? It would be impossible for me to buy this in person.

    And by default config-does that even mean external things like a modem and applecare? Technically they make it look like it's no longer a "default config".
     
  13. neven macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #13
    AppleCare shouldn't affect your return. A modem might. Just call and ask - all we can give you is pointless speculation.

    If you're concerned about actual hardware problems (you mentioned "bad audio") then that would fall under AppleCare anyway. You should only be concerned with the return policy if you think you might return the computer due to buyer's remorse, not due to an actual hardware problem.

    By the way, you mentioned "now I'm being told Apple's laptops can't run the CPUs at full blast all the time". Whatever else you may think about donated CPU cycles, be aware that:

    - Increased CPU usage causes an increase in electricity usage by the CPU.
    - Increased electricity usage causes an increase in heat production by the CPU.
    - Increased heat production can lead to premature failure of the CPU and/or other components in your computer.

    Just saying - you might have to find a balance between having a reliable, long-lived computer and an always-running one.
     
  14. Wolfpup thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    #14
    I tend to get buyers remorse when I buy anything anyway :D And if I get static shocks from it, or hiss-y/static-y audio, I'll probably just want to be done with it and send it back, not risk getting it fixed.

    I shouldn't have to. It should be designed to handle running at full blast (I did finally have someone say that they do always run two copies of Folding @ Home all the time, but they haven't gotten back to me about that yet).
     
  15. neven macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #15
    Well, given your peculiar expectations, attitude, and the fact that you don't have an Apple store nearby, I'd say don't get an MBP then. It sounds like you're setting yourself up for a bad consumer experience. If you're likely to be unhappy, then go with a different brand.
     
  16. crazzyeddie macrumors 68030

    crazzyeddie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    #16
    If you run F@H the fans will run all the time. And you will hear them.

    Its a 1" thick laptop, not a Mac Pro with large fans.
     
  17. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    #17
    the online store and the local retail stores have the same return policy.

    If your modem is an external that you plug into a port then it's not going to change your computer's status any more than if you plug in a printer......so no, plugging in an external doesn't change your computer from stock to a custom-built.
     
  18. Wolfpup thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    #18
    Okay, cool. I mean obviously it shouldn't, but you have to "configure" it on the Apple.com configuration page, just like you would with RAM or a hard drive, so...

    Dang nabbit! Four systems to choose from, and they all have issues:

    -Macbook-terrible GPU, completely wrong for games

    -Dell XPS 1330-low end GPU, bad for games, practically twice as much as the Macbook (for really not much more power).

    -Macbook Pro-slightly cheaper than the 1330, twice the GPU power so it's okay for games...but it has that stupid sealed hard drive! (This is assuming I get one that won't SHOCK me or have hissing audio, or whatever).

    -Dell XPS 1730-will probably launch in the next few months. Awesome for games, but probably 50% more than the Macbook Pro's low end config. All the DRM and "activation" they're sticking on PC games makes me almost want to give it up.

    I ruled out the Inspiron 1520/1720 because no digital output! It's like all these systems have ONE stupid thing wrong with them! :mad:
     
  19. neven macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2006
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #19
    Ever heard the rule that out of

    1. cheap
    2. good
    3. fast

    ...you can pick any two, but not three? With computers, it's

    1. cheap
    2. good
    3. fully customizable

    Pick two.

    P.S. Good luck convincing anyone on this board that price is any Dell's only disadvantage over any Mac...
     

Share This Page