HowTo set all folder permissions globally ...

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Lion (10.7)' started by ctrlzjones, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. ctrlzjones, Mar 30, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2012

    ctrlzjones macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2012
    #1
    during the install of the Lion there must have gone something wrong.

    there is a problem with the permissions to access some (not all) folders contents. It happens arbitrary in all kind of the file systems levels (disk/user/ ...)

    I can of course correct to permissions with the folders info panel. But this would be one by one; and there are a lot of folders affected.

    So I man sure that there is a way to set all the permissions of all the folders of that disk for once & for ever granting me to get inside.

    How could that be achieved? A nifty terminal procedure?

    __edit:__

    found it! this here does what I want ...

    cd /volumes/(Your_Volume_Name_Here)
    chmod -R 777 *
    (area = topmost folder where you are having the problem)
    (777 gives EVERYONE read/write/execute permissions. -R means operate on everything below the topmost folder, * operates on every file)
    __________________
     
  2. r0k macrumors 68040

    r0k

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Location:
    Detroit
    #2
    Giving everyone read write access to everything on your Mac may have fixed the problem but it creates a very insecure installation.

    I suggest you consider making some small modifications. For instance, go to your home folder and make just the top level folder 755 (chmod . 755). This will keep prying eyes out of your home folder. You still have a system where even a guest account user could do great damage but at least you've put a block between them and your home folder.

    Any further tweaks you make to permissions are better done one folder at a time, operating only on the folder rather than affecting the whole filesystem. Whatever you do, don't ever reduce permissions recursively from / or you might put yourself in a situation where you can't boot and even if you boot you don't have permission to run the programs you need to repair things.
     

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