HP Mini

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by dogslobber, Apr 1, 2016.

  1. dogslobber macrumors 68020

    dogslobber

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    #1
  2. jpietrzak8 macrumors 65816

    jpietrzak8

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    #2
    Even the top-spec version of this HP, the one with the i3 processor, appears to be much less powerful than the bottom-specced 2014 Mac Mini. (Although it features standard SO-DIMM memory slots, so that's one advantage it does have over the Mac.)

    I could see Apple going this route I suppose, but it'd mean that the Mac Mini would become basically unsuitable for any serious number-crunching work. (Although, I guess, it's only barely suitable now as it is...)
     
  3. dwfaust macrumors 68040

    dwfaust

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  4. Jtludwig macrumors 6502

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    #4
    Well no sh*t..they aren't made by Apple.
     
  5. jbarley macrumors 68030

    jbarley

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    #5
    Which by the way OS X seems to be heading may be a good thing.:rolleyes:
     
  6. Meister Suspended

    Meister

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    #6
    Comparing this HP to a mini is like comparing a bicycle to a porsche:

    The bicycle is much smaller, lighter and cheaper. And it gets you from A to B.

    Sounds like bicycles give cars a run for their money.
     
  7. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

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    #7
    The HP is deceptively small compared to the Mac Mini because the HP is significantly less powerful and it has an external brick power supply, as opposed to the Mini's internal power supply.
     
  8. MRrainer macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    It's a Pavilion. I would never, ever buy something from HP's consumer-line.

    They have the EliteDesk and ProDesk systems with form-factors similar to the Mini (and comparable or better specs). Those I'd actually take a 2nd look at, if for whatever reason I didn't want to run OS X at home anymore.
     
  9. crsh1976, Apr 5, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2016

    crsh1976 macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    The size is impressive (tho this is not a new design/model, it came out a good while ago), but in terms of horsepower this thing ranks much lower than a Mac Mini.

    For all its faults and soldered RAM, the Mini is a useable and polyvalent desktop computer that's capable to running everything without choking (except demanding games), this Pavilion Mini is only good for basic computing (or to make a decent media box/server). It does have a few things going for itself, namely the price and allowing the user to replace some parts.

    And for having made the error of buying consumer-grade HP products before, good $deity spare yourself the pain and frustration, and get something else.
     
  10. Lankyman macrumors 68000

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    #10
    With the advent of W10 that argument no longer holds water with anyone serious about computing. Both systems are equally good.
     
  11. jpietrzak8 macrumors 65816

    jpietrzak8

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    #11
    How well does W10 run Unix apps? I like the fact that OS X is based on a derivative of BSD Unix, and includes most of the tools and command-line utilities I've been using since I got my Computer Science degree years ago.

    Of course, it's possible that I'm just not serious about computing.
     
  12. Jtludwig macrumors 6502

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    #12
    I've always been a Mac guy, but I decided to give a Lenovo M900 Tiny with Windows 10 a try.

    I use it as my home media/Plex server and it's great.

    It has a fast quad core processor, 16GB ram, ssd drive, and supports three external displays.

    I got all this for less than a low-mid range Mac Mini.
     
  13. Lankyman macrumors 68000

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    #13
    jtludwig post 12 should be able to provide you with some pointers. Obviously your degree didn't include anything about having the ability to embrace change then?
     
  14. jpietrzak8 macrumors 65816

    jpietrzak8

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    #14
    Ah, you're absolutely right! My studies included compiler construction, relational algebra & calculus, and analysis of algorithms. I completely missed the course on Plex servers. My apologies, I bow to your obviously superior ability to embrace change.
     
  15. Lankyman macrumors 68000

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    #15
    Yes well not your fault I suppose, it's one of the downsides of geeky-ness - well known. Simply a case of getting out more and meeting real people and trying new things.
     
  16. Micky Do, Apr 11, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2016

    Micky Do macrumors 68000

    Micky Do

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    #16
    I'm not serious about computing….. don't want to muck around with hardware and software. I just want to do stuff. In my experience I can still do so with less hassle using OS X.

    I do most of my work at home, using OS X on a Mac Mini and Mac apps. I do a little in the office on campus, on various computers using Windows 10.
     
  17. Lankyman macrumors 68000

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    So tell us what things you can do with less hassle?
     
  18. Osty macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    They run Linux though with minimal effort; it's nice to jump off the MS and Apple bandwagon, give it a try.

    Exactly, you get it.

    Very well apparently thanks to a partnership between Canonical and Microsoft to bring the Ubuntu userland to W10.

    Apple used to crow about Unix but they are actively trying to abstract users more and more from that legacy. As a company, they've lost interest and incentive to make OS X anything more than a halo for the iOS world. Their vision for personal computing is not OS X.

    OS X is a means for them to hedge their bets; something to fall back on if their great iOS gamble fails to become the OS of choice.

    Given Apple's pushing Swift on Linux, I wouldn't be shocked if Apple ports Xcode to Ubuntu and abandons desktops computers.
     
  19. paulrbeers macrumors 68040

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    #19
    I guess I fail to see what this has anything to do with whether Windows 10 has equaled OSX? Quite honestly, I was a "Mac" guy and now have a Windows 10 Machine (a Surface Pro 3). To be honest, I don't love the Surface Pro, but Windows 10 is not the piece of Junk that say Windows 8, Vista, etc. were (Windows 7 wasn't terrible I guess?).

    To be honest, I find that Windows has come along way and OSX has gone downhill bringing both very much on par with each other.

    Now whether you can run a particular piece of software on Windows 10, that I can't speak for. But my guess is that many people in your "line of work" have been using Windows Machines for years..... Just because you choose to only snub your nose at anything that isn't Unix, doesn't mean other OS's haven't come along way.
     
  20. Queen6, Apr 12, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2016

    Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

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    #20
  21. Osty macrumors 6502a

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    #21
    I agree.

    Linux, with its steady pace of continual improvement has eclipsed them both in my experience. I regularly use all three and don't 'love' any of them. Linux performs better on the same hardware, has equal or better functionality in the user land and is the only desktop operating system that you can tailor 100% to your preferences and workflow.
     
  22. jpietrzak8 macrumors 65816

    jpietrzak8

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    #22
    Alright, yeah, it's true -- I have been snubbing Windows. Personally, the OS I first used was Apple DOS (on an Apple ][+ ). I started using both Unix and Windows in college (back around the time both Windows and Linux appeared), and for a while, both were decent tools for getting work done. However, while the business world adopted Windows fairly quickly, Microsoft also pushed harder and harder to add gratuitous features and endless bits of UI code into their OS, where Unix & Linux maintained a fairly clean separation between the OS layer and the UI layer. The amount of bloat in Windows became truly staggering, bugs became frequent, and the thing just became a hacker's playground.

    I kind of gave up on Windows around the Vista era. I hated the idea that you had to constantly pay protection money to an anti-virus company in order to ensure your machine would keep running day to day, and honestly, it just wasn't fun to develop on Windows any more. And with the advent of OS X, tying together the clean design of Unix with the business-friendly environment Apple provided, there really wasn't any need to run Windows. Major consumer applications finally started becoming available on a Unix platform.

    I understand that Windows 10 really does appear to have a much, much nicer UI than Microsoft has provided in years. And, from what I've read, it has plenty of enjoyable features. However, to my eyes, it still has many of the same problems -- gratuitous bloat, unnecessary UI-OS linkages, and a deep tie to the anti-virus protection racket. Of course, there's no reason you can't get work done with Windows; it's just that, I don't yet see a convincing argument to bring me back to the Windows world. OS X / Linux can still do everything just as well.
     
  23. Micky Do macrumors 68000

    Micky Do

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    #23
    Almost all the apps I use come preloaded with a Mac; dunno what the situation is with Windows, but time was that most needed to be acquired and loaded.

    Pages and Numbers may not have all the features that Word and Excel have, but they have all that I need (and I guess many others) and are a lot easier to use. iPhoto (now Photos) is fine for my photography needs (which includes some published work). I use Garage Band a bit; dunno what what equivalent is offered for Windows, or how easy it is to use. Peripherals just seem to work with Mac, whereas in my experience they need to be installed with Windows.

    Both Windows and Mac run iTunes, an increasingly messy app that just about everyone has to live with.

    Not an issue for me, as I have no other iDevices, but it seems that for folks with iPhones and iPads connectivity is fairly straight forward. Dunno how it is with others.

    The Windows computers at work often seem to need attention to something. I have had my Mini in the shop a couple of times in 7 years for a clean out, and installed extra RAM and Mountain Lion the first time. With no credit card, and very poor connection speed DIY at home was not a goer.

    Sure the Mac may cost a bit more for similarly specced hardware, but I am happy to stump up the cash and do away with the hassles that come with Windows.
     

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