Hulu Launches Live and On-Demand HBO as $15 Per Month Add-On Option

CarlJ

macrumors 68030
Feb 23, 2004
2,967
4,507
0
San Diego, CA, USA
Everyone likes to talk about "cutting the cord" and whatnot... but I never hear any real numbers. :)
It depends a whole lot on what you want to watch. I don't watch a lot of "regular TV shows". I find my viewing needs 95% satisfied by Netflix ($10/mo), Hulu ($12/mo, "ad-free" which is mostly ad-free), and YouTube ($0 - plain old YouTube, not Red or TV). I'm willing to forgo the 5% I'm "missing", in favor of not having a subscription to one of the bigger costlier packages (and can always do things like... I went to a friend's house, who has HBO, and we binge-watched WestWorld together). Internet (Cox) runs in the vicinity of $80/mo for 100mpbs. So, for a little over $100, I've got enough internet to drown in, and most of the things I want to watch.
 
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vertical smile

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2014
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This. It went from cluttered-but-useful to sacrifice-everything-for-pretty. With a propensity for things like showing thin-stroked white uppercase text on yellow backgrounds. Which is nice unless, you know, you want to actually read the text, much less parse it quickly. And screens mostly devoid of information (lest it obscure the pretty background picture), so you can see maybe 3 or 4 titles (programs or episodes) at a time - it's like using an interface with blinders on (imagine if you were limited in the Finder on the Mac to windows that only showed a 2x2 grid of icons, and you had to endlessly scroll to find things).
This is a good description of some of the issues with Hulu and Netflix's UI on the ATV4. The apps are needlessly complex, but at the same time missing basic features. One of the feature that made the ATV3's Netflix app so great was the genres and sub-genres. Not too long ago, genres was added to the ATV4's Netflix app, but they are very broad, and not in sub-categories like the the ATV3 app. AN example would be Genres>Horror>Vampire Horror. This is one of many other issues with both Hulu and Netflix.

And what does it cost to get just internet from Comcast?
This will not be the same for everyone, but I switch back and forth every few months to a year between Comcast and FiOS. I do that to get the "New Customer Rates". I understand that I am very lucky to have more than one ISP available at my home, so I know not everyone can do this.

Right now, I am paying $39 a month for 25Mbps downloads from Comcast. I could pay an additional $20 more a month and get 200 Mbps downloads, but I find that 25Mbps to be adequate for my very stream-heavy family. I do not rent my cable modem.

Everyone likes to talk about "cutting the cord" and whatnot... but I never hear any real numbers.
The problem with real numbers is that everyone situation is different. Some people are perfectly happy with the $8 Netflix account. Some people have to have sports channels. Some people would say that they must have the fishing channel (my brother), so they are forced/choose to buy one of the highest cable tiers.

I don't like the argument against cord cutting that it will be almost as expensive as cable. Even if that was true, you would still be save some money. But in many cases, it is what people choose not to forgo that ends up making the total costs of cutting the cord so high.

Another issue about cord cutting is the definition. It could mean so many things. Some people may consider cutting the cord as in no cable service at all. I personally believe that just getting an internet plan, with a bare-bones TV service included as cutting the cord. In many cases, it only costs a little more, and you can get a premium channel like HBO. Then you can get a streaming service like Netflix for most of your content viewing.

I consider it cutting the cord, because the customer is not buying the expensive cable tv tier that the Cable Companies are so used to their customers getting.

Also, a significant portion of many people's cable bills are the equipment rentals. IMO, one part of cord cutting is reducing/eliminating the amount of the equipment rental cost.

I'm willing to forgo the 5% I'm "missing
I think that is what it comes down to, what a cable cutter is willing to forgo. People could save a lot of money a month by having only internet and Netflix.

I personally get HBO and Showtime every couple months, either through my ISP/cable provider, or the apps. If it is from the ISP, I never pay full price, and many times, I pay $5 more for a lite-TV package with a premium channel. Add the family plan of Netflix, and the commercial-free Hulu, plus the Stars app every once in a while and my family never runs out of content. All while saving a significant amount of money over cable.
 

yanksfan114

macrumors 6502
Jul 30, 2011
302
814
0
Curious here...

What exactly are you getting for your $160 a month on Comcast? I'm guessing internet and some TV packages? Maybe a home phone included in the bundle?

And what does it cost to get just internet from Comcast?

And then how many of these additional services will you be subscribing to?

Once you get Netflix and/or Hulu... then maybe a premium service like HBO... and then a DirecTV Now, SlingTV, or YoutubeTV for regular TV shows...

I'm wondering what the total monthly expenditure will be.

Everyone likes to talk about "cutting the cord" and whatnot... but I never hear any real numbers. :)
$160 gets me 100mbps internet, basically every (regular) HD channel, STARZ thrown in, phone (don’t even use or own a home phone, and the router rental fee.

I can hop on a xfinity internet deal that is 400mbps for $70. Already pay for Hulu and Netflix for my family and have free HBO through ATT wireless service. So add on a Hulu live tv subscription for example, and my bill comes out to $110. Saving roughly $50/month.

Got a lot of comparing to do first but this is my most likely course of action.
 

valkraider

macrumors regular
Apr 22, 2004
228
29
0
HBO Now's interface is infinitely better than the garbage known as Hulu.

Hulu has the worst interface known to man. It is painful to use.
 

Coffee50

macrumors 6502a
Apr 23, 2015
553
189
0
This is a good description of some of the issues with Hulu and Netflix's UI on the ATV4. The apps are needlessly complex, but at the same time missing basic features. One of the feature that made the ATV3's Netflix app so great was the genres and sub-genres. Not too long ago, genres was added to the ATV4's Netflix app, but they are very broad, and not in sub-categories like the the ATV3 app. AN example would be Genres>Horror>Vampire Horror. This is one of many other issues with both Hulu and Netflix.


This will not be the same for everyone, but I switch back and forth every few months to a year between Comcast and FiOS. I do that to get the "New Customer Rates". I understand that I am very lucky to have more than one ISP available at my home, so I know not everyone can do this.

Right now, I am paying $39 a month for 25Mbps downloads from Comcast. I could pay an additional $20 more a month and get 200 Mbps downloads, but I find that 25Mbps to be adequate for my very stream-heavy family. I do not rent my cable modem.


The problem with real numbers is that everyone situation is different. Some people are perfectly happy with the $8 Netflix account. Some people have to have sports channels. Some people would say that they must have the fishing channel (my brother), so they are forced/choose to buy one of the highest cable tiers.

I don't like the argument against cord cutting that it will be almost as expensive as cable. Even if that was true, you would still be save some money. But in many cases, it is what people choose not to forgo that ends up making the total costs of cutting the cord so high.

Another issue about cord cutting is the definition. It could mean so many things. Some people may consider cutting the cord as in no cable service at all. I personally believe that just getting an internet plan, with a bare-bones TV service included as cutting the cord. In many cases, it only costs a little more, and you can get a premium channel like HBO. Then you can get a streaming service like Netflix for most of your content viewing.

I consider it cutting the cord, because the customer is not buying the expensive cable tv tier that the Cable Companies are so used to their customers getting.

Also, a significant portion of many people's cable bills are the equipment rentals. IMO, one part of cord cutting is reducing/eliminating the amount of the equipment rental cost.



I think that is what it comes down to, what a cable cutter is willing to forgo. People could save a lot of money a month by having only internet and Netflix.

I personally get HBO and Showtime every couple months, either through my ISP/cable provider, or the apps. If it is from the ISP, I never pay full price, and many times, I pay $5 more for a lite-TV package with a premium channel. Add the family plan of Netflix, and the commercial-free Hulu, plus the Stars app every once in a while and my family never runs out of content. All while saving a significant amount of money over cable.
This is true. I think cord cutting encompasses a variety of things for different users.

I've said this before, but I also think a lot of people don't pay for each of these services. There are threads & post where people mention that they may pay for just one service, and then use a family member or friends password for the others.

They still receive access to all this content, yet only pay for 1 or 2 of them, therefore saving them money.
[doublepost=1500247184][/doublepost]Has anyone used hulu from the beginning? If so, how has the experience in over the past few months.

I don't like that UI, but I'm thinking or recommending it to someone because it's the cheapest service that includes CBS ( I looked at sling orange, but there's more that comes with Hulu)